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I'm writing a class that parses HTML in order to provide an interface to a profile on a webpage. It looks something like this:

class Profile(BeautifulSoup):
    def __init__(self, page_source):
        super().__init__(page_source)

    def username(self):
        return self.title.split(':')[0]

Except more complex and time consuming. Since I know that the underlying profiles aren't going to be changing during the lifetime of a Profile object, I thought this would be a good place to cache results in order to avoid recalculating values that are already known. I implemented this with a decorator, and the result looks like this:

def cached_resource(method_to_cache):
    def decorator(self, *args, **kwargs):
        method_name = method_to_cache.__name__

        try:
            return self._cache[method_name]
        except KeyError:
            self._cache[method_name] = method_to_cache(self, *args, **kwargs)
            return self._cache[method_name]

    return decorator


class Profile(BeautifulSoup):
    def __init__(self, page_source):
        super().__init__(page_source)
        self._cache = {}

    @cached_resource
    def username(self):
        return self.title.split(':')[0]

When I give this code to pylint, it complains about cached_resource having access to a protected variable of a client class.

I realize that the distinction between public and private isn't a huge deal in Python, but I'm still curious -- have I done something bad here? Is it poor style to have decorators rely on implementation details of the classes they're associated with?

EDIT: I'm unclear about how the closure in Duncan's answer works, so maybe this is a little bit kludge-y, but would this be a simpler solution?

def cached_resource(method_to_cache):
    def decorator(self, *args, **kwargs):
    method_name = method_to_cache.__name__

    try:
        return self._cache[method_name]
    except KeyError:
        self._cache[method_name] = method_to_cache(self, *args, **kwargs)
    except AttributeError:
        self._cache = {}
        self._cache[method_name] = method_to_cache(self, *args, **kwargs)
    finally:
        return self._cache[method_name]

return decorator
share|improve this question
    
you're not modeling username as a private function though... its public in your implementation –  Greg Sep 9 '13 at 6:58
    
Yes -- it's complaining about cached_resource having access to the private variable self._cache. On the one hand it makes sense to me because I would have no way of knowing that cached_resource depends on its client class having an attribute named _cache unless I read through it. On the other hand, it seems pretty strange to say that something which is as low-level and ugly as a dictionary being used as a cache should be public. –  Patrick Collins Sep 9 '13 at 7:03

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There is a bit of a code smell about that, I think I would agree with pylint on this one though it is quite subjective.

Your decorator looks like it is a general-purpose decorator, but it is tied into the internal implementation detail of the class. If you tried to use it from another class it won't work without the initialisation of _cache in __init__. The linkage I don't like is that the knowledge of an attribute called '_cache' is shared between both the class and the decorator.

You could move the initialisation of _cache out of __init__ and into the decorator. I don't know if that would help pacify pylint and it still requires the class to know about and avoid using the attribute. A cleaner solution here (I think) would be to pass the name of the cache attribute into the decorator. That should break the linkage cleanly:

def cached_resource(cache_attribute):
  def decorator_factory(method_to_cache):
    def decorator(self, *args, **kwargs):
        method_name = method_to_cache.__name__
        cache = getattr(self, cache_attribute)
        try:
            return cache[method_name]
        except KeyError:
            result = cache[method_name] = method_to_cache(self, *args, **kwargs)
            return result

    return decorator
  return decorator_factory


class Profile(BeautifulSoup):
    def __init__(self, page_source):
        super().__init__(page_source)
        self._cache = {}

    @cached_resource('_cache')
    def username(self):
        return self.title.split(':')[0]

And if you don't like a lot of decorator calls repeating the name of the attribute then:

class Profile(BeautifulSoup):
    def __init__(self, page_source):
        super().__init__(page_source)
        self._cache = {}

    with_cache = cached_resource('_cache')

    @with_cache
    def username(self):
        return self.title.split(':')[0]

Edit: Martineau suggests this may be overkill. It could be if you don't actually need separate access to the _cache attribute inside the class (e.g. to have a cache reset method). In that case you could manage the cache entirely within the decorator, but if you are going to do that you don't need a cache dictionary on the instance at all, as you can store the cache in the decorator and key on the Profile instance:

from weakref import WeakKeyDictionary

def cached_resource(method_to_cache):
    cache = WeakKeyDictionary()
    def decorator(self, *args, **kwargs):
        try:
            return cache[self]
        except KeyError:
            result = cache[self] = method_to_cache(self, *args, **kwargs)
        return result
    return decorator

class Profile(BeautifulSoup):
    def __init__(self, page_source):
        super().__init__(page_source)
        self._cache = {}

    @cached_resource
    def username(self):
        return self.title.split(':')[0]
share|improve this answer
    
While I agree with you that it would be better to avoid coupling of classes, I think your decorator should just add a cache attribute of its own choosing to the decorated function. The complication of making it a variable and having a factory isn't worth it and is likely unnecessary, IMO. –  martineau Sep 9 '13 at 9:34
    
@martineau, I might well agree with you depending on what else is going on. Does Profile need a method to clear/reset the cache? If so both class and decorator need to access the same attribute. On the other hand if the cache is never reset (except by creating a new Profile() instance) using any attribute at all may be overkill as a local variable in the decorator would suffice. –  Duncan Sep 9 '13 at 9:40
    
It probably doesn't need a method to clear/reset the cache, Profile objects will have a pretty short lifespan. I don't understand how it could be managed entirely within the decorator, though. I'm always a little bit confused on the lifetime of variables in nested functions, but won't the cache in the second code snippet always be empty? Or, if I'm wrong, won't it try to use the same cache across profile objects? How is it possible to tie a local variable in cached_resource to a specific Profile object? –  Patrick Collins Sep 9 '13 at 15:42
    
@PatrickCollins quite right, I wasn't thinking straight there. I've corrected my code so it caches one value per instance. –  Duncan Sep 9 '13 at 17:57

What you did looks fine to me. The error is presumably because pylint can't figure out that cached_resource is only "accessing" self._cache via its inner function, which ultimately is a method of the class (assigned by the decorator).

It might be worth raising an issue on the pylint tracker for this. It could be tough to handle with static analysis but the current behavior doesn't seem right.

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