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I am new too the groovy. I have simple code to learn the groovy closures. My code is

class function1{

        static void main(def args){
                square = {it * it}
                [1,2,3].each(square);
        }
}

So, output of the program should like 1,4,9. But I am getting error as

org.codehaus.groovy.control.MultipleCompilationErrorsException: startup failed:
/home/xxx/GroovyTest/example2.groovy: 4: Apparent variable 'square' was found in a static scope but doesn't refer to a local variable, static field or class. Possible causes:
You attempted to reference a variable in the binding or an instance variable from a static context.
You misspelled a classname or statically imported field. Please check the spelling.
You attempted to use a method 'square' but left out brackets in a place not allowed by the grammar.
 @ line 4, column 3.
                square = {it * it}
     ^

/home/xxx/GroovyTest/example2.groovy: 5: Apparent variable 'square' was found in a static scope but doesn't refer to a local variable, static field or class. Possible causes:
You attempted to reference a variable in the binding or an instance variable from a static context.
You misspelled a classname or statically imported field. Please check the spelling.
You attempted to use a method 'square' but left out brackets in a place not allowed by the grammar.
 @ line 5, column 16.
                [1,2,3].each(square)
                  ^

2 errors

I am not getting how variable square found in static scope.

Thank you

share|improve this question
    
Also, classes should have capitalized names class Function1 –  tim_yates Sep 9 '13 at 8:05
    
and just static main( args ) { will do in Groovy –  tim_yates Sep 9 '13 at 8:05

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Try:

 static void main(def args){
     def square = {it * it}
     [1,2,3].each(square);
 }
share|improve this answer
    
@Optimus, @IgorArtamonov, i'd like to add: you can only use undeclared variables (i.e., without def or explicit typing) when using scripts. You can code this behavior yourself, also. –  Will P Sep 9 '13 at 9:58

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