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I'd like to add a generic type method DoSomething<T>, but for backwards compatibility, I want it to simply pass the type parameter for the generic type from an existing method with the same name.

public void DoSomething<T>(Data data)
{
    //do something with Data, it depends on the type of T
}

public void DoSomething(Data data, Type dataType)
{
    DoSomething<dataType>(group);
}

However, <dataType> in the new DoSomething throws following type checking error: "Type name or namespace expected."

Can someone help me understand the gap in my thinking that makes the above sample a type checking error? Is what I'm doing just... bad design?

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2  
dataType is still an instance of a Type object...not a type definition you can use to declare new generic objects. You need to call the generic version of your method using Reflection. –  Justin Niessner Dec 8 '09 at 19:51
    
Actually, there'S a second reason why this wouldn't work. Your are trying to call an instance method from a static method. –  Maximilian Mayerl Dec 8 '09 at 19:52
    
@Max: Thanks, I updated my sample to be correctly relevant to the question I was more interested in. –  Mike Atlas Dec 8 '09 at 19:56

4 Answers 4

up vote 14 down vote accepted

Generics is about knowing the type at compile-time - you only know the type at execution time.

There are two ways of fixing this:

  • Make the generic code call the non-generic code instead. That's easy, but you won't have any of the benefits of generics.

  • Use reflection to call the generic code from the non-generic code. That's fiddly and won't perform as well, but you can deprecate the non-generic code and eventually remove it.

Or you could just remove it now, and fix everything up :)

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If it's really an issue; with some compiled lambda expressions you can get this quite fast as well :-) –  Jan Jongboom Dec 8 '09 at 19:54
    
The fact that Generics wire up at compile-time is what I was missing when I tried to write code that looked like Mike Atlas' example. –  jball Dec 8 '09 at 19:55

I generally find it easier to reverse the relationship between the methods, i.e.:

private void DoSomething<T>(Data data)
{
    DoSomething(data, typeof(T));
}

private void DoSomething(Data data, Type dataType)
{
    ...
}
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Yes, this is what you have to do. –  erikkallen Dec 8 '09 at 19:53

The problem here is that you are mixing generic argument and runtime type information. The type values used for a generic arguments must be established at compile time and are embedded in metadata. The type Type is a construct whose value is not known at compile time. Hence the 2 are not compatible.

Your best bet here is to make the original DoSomething method the primary method and have the new generic one feed into it.

static void DoSomething<T>(Data data) {
  DoSomething(data, typeof(T));
}

static void DoSomething(Data data, Type dataType) {
  ...
}
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If this is a private method, what concern is there for external backwards compatibility?

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sample updated. –  Mike Atlas Dec 8 '09 at 19:52

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