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I am new a C. I would like to get help to finish my function.

The mission is:

Write a function that accepts a string maximum length of 256 characters containing characters from 'a' to 'z'.

The function to print the number of occurrences of each character.

For example: input abba output will be:

a = 2 b = 2 c = 0 d = 0 .... z = 0

Do not use if during any function.

I would like to get your help to finish this program please.

This is my code

#include "stdlib.h"
#include "conio.h"
#include "stdio.h"
#include "string.h"
#define size 256



void repeat(char *str);
void main()
{
    char str[size];
    printf("Please enter a string:\n");
    flushall;
    gets(str);
    repeat(str);
    system("pause");
    return ;
}
void repeat(char *str)
{

    char temp=strlen(str);
    int i, count=0;
    do
    {
    for (i=0; i<temp ; i++)
        {
            count += (*str == str[temp-i]);
        }
    printf("Char %c appears %d times\n ",*str,count);
    count=0;
    }
    while(*(str++));
}



    Please enter a string:
abbba
Char a appears 1 times
 Char b appears 2 times
 Char b appears 1 times
 Char b appears 0 times
 Char a appears 0 times
 Char   appears 0 times
 Press any key to continue . . .

this is the output! I would like to do it in the same building i did. and should be like Char a appears 2 times Chars b appears 3 times

share|improve this question
5  
Can you explain what problems you are currently having ? Does the code compile ? Does it run ? If so, how is the output different from what you expect > –  Paul R Sep 9 '13 at 8:19
3  
gets() is evil, deprecated from the standard library, and every time its is used, somewhere a kitten dies. Use fgets(). –  WhozCraig Sep 9 '13 at 8:19
    
This should work perfectly. Tell us the problem you are facing while executing it. –  mawia Sep 9 '13 at 8:22
2  
Did you use the debugger to step through your code, inspect the variables and compare them with what you expect? –  Martin R Sep 9 '13 at 8:24
4  
I suspect the idea of the assignment was to do counts[*str - 'a']++. –  Dukeling Sep 9 '13 at 8:27

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

EDIT I have edited the program to follow the requirements of @SagiBinder.

(In my old version, I used an if sentence that checked if the character is in the set 'a'...'z').

The type of temp must be "bigger", that is, something different to char.
Try int, instead.

The algorithm would be this (some details of your program are not repeated here):

int temp = strlen(str);

int i, j;

unsigned char c; 

int ch[UCHAR_MAX]; // The macro CHAR_MAX needs the header <limits.h>
for (i = 1; i <= UCHAR_MAX; i++)
    ch[i] = 0;

for (j=0; j<temp ; j++) {
      c = (unsigned char)(str[j]);
      ch[c]++;
}

for (c = 'a'; c <= 'z'; c++)
    printf("%c == %d\n", c, ch[c]);

The variable temp holds the length of the string str.
The macro UCHAR_MAX (existing in the header <limits.h>, that you have to #include at the beginning of the program). It is the max. value that holds in a unsigned char.
The array ch[] contains a component for each possible value in the range of the type unsigned char. The intent is that, for some character c, the element ch[c] is the amount of times that c is in str.
I have used unsigned char in order to ensures that the index c of the array ch[] when writting ch[c] is a non-negative integer value, because an array cannot have negative indexes.
The 2nd for goes through the string str. In the step number j, the j-th character of the string str is taken.
This character is a value of type char.
Since one cannot be sure that char have not negative values, I have converted it to (unsigned char) with an explicit cast.
This value is held in the variable c.

The value of c has the (unsigned char version of the) j-th character in str, so we are going to count it.
How?
Well, we access the array of counters: ch[] with index c, and increment its value in 1:

      ch[c]++;

After the for is finished, we have in the array ch[] the information we want.

Finally, we check for the characters from 'a' to 'z'.
(For this, we have supposed that the character encodings in our system follow the convention that the letters have contiguous values).

The 3rd for goes from 'a' to 'z', and the values of the letter (the variable c that controls the for) and the counting of this letter, that is, ch[c].

Moreover: to show the count of any character, you need a re-cast to char, in this way:

    printf("%c: %d\n", (char)c, ch[c]);

But this is not necessary with the letters 'a' to 'z', because they belong to the basic execution character set which means that their values are non-negative and equal to their unsigned char counterparts. So, in this case, it is enough to write:

    printf("%c: %d\n", c, ch[c]);

EDIT 2: I will use the idea in the answer of @jxh to improve my code.

Since it cannot be guaranted that the encodings of letters 'a' to 'z' are in contiguous order, we can use a string holding the letters:

   char letters[] = "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz";

The "last" element is, by C convention, a \0 character held after the element 'z'.

   Now, we can show the letter counting by changing the 3rd `for` in this way:  

 for (i = 0; letter[i] != '\0'; i++)
     printf("%c == %d\n", letter[i], ch[letter[i]]);

This is equivalent to write:

 for (i = 0; letter[i] != '\0'; i++) {
     c = letter[i];
     printf("%c == %d\n", c, ch[c]);
 }
share|improve this answer
    
Hey pablo! I would like to get more details about the letter " letter[str[i]-'a'] ++;" I didn't understand it. Thanks for your help –  Sagi Binder Sep 9 '13 at 8:41
    
str[i] is the character you want to increment. If you convert a character to a string, 'a' is 97. The lowercase alphabet runs from 97..122. You could make a bigger array (letter[123] or letter[256]), or you just subtract 97 from each char before using it in the array. A common way to do that is to subtract 'a', which provides a little bit of a hint why you're subtracting a constant, rather than just a magic number. –  tfinniga Sep 9 '13 at 8:48
    
I need do this function without using the IF i am talking about the second FOR –  Sagi Binder Sep 9 '13 at 8:52
    
@SagiBinder: I have changed my answer by writting a clearer version of the program. It is more technical too. Observe that, in order to avoid my first version (that used an "if" there), it is necessary to consider an array that counts over all the possible characters in the system. The idea is to use the character itself as an index of an array of counters. Each character has, in this way, its own counter, easily accessed. The problem with this approach is that some char values could be negative. This need a temporary conversion to unsigned char, that I have used in my program. –  pablo1977 Sep 9 '13 at 13:30

You make a stipulation about not using if. This satisfies that restriction.

#include <stdio.h>

int main(void) {
    int i, c;
    int counts[256] = { 0 };
    const char lower[] = "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz";
    while ((c = getchar()) != EOF) {
        counts[c] += 1;
    }
    for (i = 0; lower[i]; ++i) {
        c = lower[i];
        printf("Char %c appears %d times.\n", c, counts[c]);
    }
    return 0;
}

The problem with your attempt is that you do not track any state to remember which characters you have already printed information about. It also fails to include the character under consideration as part of the count. It also makes multiple passes over the string to collect count information about each character, but that doesn't affect correctness, just performance. If you can somehow remember which character you have already printed out information for, so that you don't do it again when the same character appears later in the string, your method should print out the counts for the characters that appear. Afterwards, you would need to print out zero counts for the characters that did not appear at all. If the outputs need to be in alphabetical order, then you need to make sure you take care of that as well.

One way to track the information properly and to allow your output to be printed in alphabetical order is to maintain counts for each character in an array. After making a pass over the string and incrementing the count associated with each found character, you can iterate over the count array, and print out the counts.


The following program is for zubergu:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

int main (void) {
    int i, c;
    int counts[26] = { 0 };
    const char lower[] = "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz";
    while ((c = getchar()) != EOF) {
        switch (c) {
        case 'a': case 'b': case 'c': case 'd': case 'e': case 'f': case 'g':
        case 'h': case 'i': case 'j': case 'k': case 'l': case 'm': case 'n':
        case 'o': case 'p': case 'q': case 'r': case 's': case 't': case 'u':
        case 'v': case 'w': case 'x': case 'y': case 'z':
            counts[strchr(lower, c) - lower] += 1;
            break;
        default:
            break;
        }
    }
    for (i = 0; lower[i]; ++i) {
        printf("Char %c appears %d times.\n", lower[i], counts[i]);
    }
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Do you initialize counts to all \0? It's an array ints, why not set the elements to 0 rather than the NULL character? You can even initialize the array at definition with int counts[256] = {0};. –  Gauthier Sep 9 '13 at 9:02
    
@Gauthier: The memset() sets all bits to 0. The compound initialization is also valid, but some compilers (erroneously) warn about not providing enough intializers. –  jxh Sep 9 '13 at 9:06
    
@zubergu: My program doesn't care what value 'a' is, it works with either ASCII or EBCDIC encodings. –  jxh Sep 9 '13 at 9:10
    
@zubergu: The array is sized to 256. –  jxh Sep 9 '13 at 9:13
    
I went lost while i was trying to read this code. I don't know what is EDF and i know only malloc for memory.. thanks anyway –  Sagi Binder Sep 9 '13 at 9:13

It might be one of the ugliest solutions, but also the simplest:

while(*str!='\0')
{
  switch(tolower(*str))
  {
    case 'a': a_count++;break;
    case 'b': b_count++;break;
    .
    .
    .
  }
  str++;
}

It checks if str points to valid letter, then turns it to lower, so it's not case sensitive('A' will be same as 'a' character). No 'if' used and will work with every length char array terminated with '\0' char.

share|improve this answer
    
simple but not smart move to do it. thanks anyway –  Sagi Binder Sep 9 '13 at 9:12
2  
Not every piece of code has to be clever. It's even more true if you are just a beginner. Better use simple, understandable for you piece of code, than copy somebody else's fast, clever solution and not get a word out of it. –  zubergu Sep 9 '13 at 9:27

Optimized solution. complexity O(N), N - Input String length.

your void repeat function will be like this,

void repeat(char *str)
{

    int temp=strlen(str);// use int here
    int i, count=0;
int charCount[26] = {0};


#if 0
//your logic, traverses the string (n*n) time, n - input string length.
    do
    {
        for (i=0; i<temp ; i++)
        {
            count += (*str == str[temp-i]);
        }
        printf("Char %c appears %d times\n ",*str,count);
        count=0;
    }
    while(*(str++));
#endif

#if 1
// This logic traverses string once only. n time, n - input string length.
for (i=0; i<temp ; i++)
    {
        charCount[str[i]%'a']++;
    }

for (i=0; i<26 ; i++)
    {
        printf("%c appears :  %d times \n", 'a'+i, charCount[i]);
    }
#endif
}

[EDIT] Here

charCount[str[i]%'a']++; // 'a' is used a its ASCII Value.

You can use it as

charCount[str[i]%97]++;
  1. If you wan to count lower case letter and upper case letter both.

use it like this

if(str[i] >= 'a' && str[i] <= 'z'){
        iMap = str[i]%97; // 97 is ASCII Value of 'a'
        charCount[iMap]++;
    }else if(str[i] >= 'A' && str[i] <= 'Z'){
        iMap = str[i]%65; // 65 is ASCII Value of 'A'
        charCount[iMap]++;
    }
//iMpa is a integer (int iMap;), used for better undersanding.
share|improve this answer
2  
It's looks good and working but I would like to get help what does this "charCount[str[i]%'a']++;" in the code? –  Sagi Binder Sep 9 '13 at 12:07
2  
-1: str[i] % 'a': implies very bad countings. –  pablo1977 Sep 9 '13 at 13:43
    
I just updated the code, It will count only abcd letters. It will ignore space, comma etc. –  surender8388 Sep 9 '13 at 13:58
    
I tired to build some input checks will be between 'a' to 'z' to solve this problem but i went lost with it. –  Sagi Binder Sep 9 '13 at 14:00
    
#define size 256 void repeat(char str); void main() { int i; char str[size]; // Setting a string up to 256 characters printf("Please enter a string:\n"); flushall; gets(str); // Getting the string / while(*str) // Checking the string is based of chars between 'a' untill 'z' { for (i=0 ; i<strlen(str) ; i++ ) { if ((strchr(str,str[i]) > 'a') && (strchr(str,str[i]) < 'z')) str++; else { printf("Input error, The string must contain characters from 'a' to 'z'\n"); return; } } }*/ repeat(str);// Calling the counting fucntion system("pause"); return ; } –  Sagi Binder Sep 9 '13 at 14:02
 i = 0;
  while (s[i] !=0)
   if (( s[i] >= 'a' && s[i] <= 'z') || (s[i] <= 'A' && s[i] >= 'Z'))
   {
     letters++;
     i++;
   }
   else
     if (( s[i] >= '!' && s[i] <= ')'))
     {
       other++;
     }
   else
     if (( s[i] >= '0' && s[i] <= '9'))
     {
       numbers++;
     }
      total = letters + numbers + other;
share|improve this answer
1  
This doesn't solve the task given bcause it doesn't discriminate different letters. –  Frerich Raabe Sep 9 '13 at 8:28
    
And it does not fulfill "Do not use if during any function". –  Gauthier Sep 9 '13 at 8:36

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