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This question already has an answer here:

Sorry if this sounds dumb, but I can't seem to figure out how to use the variable that I defined in the If statements.

import java.util.Scanner;

public class HelloWorld {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Scanner scanner = new Scanner(System.in);



        //Prompt for Enchantment Type
        System.out.println("Armor/Tool/Weapon");

        //Wait for response
        String input1 = scanner.nextLine();

        if(input1 == "Armor"){
            int type = 0;
        }
        else if(input1 == "Tool"){
            int type = 1;
        }
        else if(input1 == "Weapon"){
            int type = 2;
        }
        else {
            int type = 3;
        }

        //This is where I need to access the type int
        if(type == 1){

        }
    }
}

I can't figure out how to use the type string outside of it's block. I know that I'm supposed to read on scope and stuff, but I'd really like someone to just explain it to me.

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by jlordo, Jarrod Roberson, thegrinner, Klas Lindbäck, devnull Sep 9 '13 at 12:35

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
@jlordo Definitely a problem here, but not the question being asked. – thegrinner Sep 9 '13 at 12:35
    
@thegrinner: Yes, I saw the code and marked duplicate without seeing the other problem... – jlordo Sep 9 '13 at 12:38
    
upvoted as it seems to have cleared this for more than one person, looking at comments ! who reads all the old questions ! – tgkprog Sep 9 '13 at 12:38
  1. Declare the variable outside of the if's scope
  2. Use .equals to compare strings

Fixed code:

String input1 = scanner.nextLine();
int type; // scope

if(input1.equals("Armor")){
    int type = 0;
}
else if(input1.equals("Tool")){
    int type = 1;
}
else if(input1.equals("Weapon")){
    int type = 2;
}
else {
    int type = 3;
}

//This is where I need to access the String type
if(type == 1){

}

Note that you can also use a switch statement (only in Java 7!):

switch(input1) {
case "Armor":
    type = 0;
    break;
case "Tool":
    type = 1;
    break;
...

Also, in your case you could try indexOf:

import java.util.Arrays;

List<String> types = Arrays.asList("Armor", "Tool", "Weapon");
int type = types.indexOf(input1);
if (type == -1) type = 3; // if it's not found
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for showing how it’s done in Java 7. – Michael Piefel Sep 9 '13 at 12:37

If you want to use variables outside an if-statement then you need to declare it outside the if-statement.

Also you don't use == to compare String objects for contents equality, that only compares their identity. Use the .equals() or .equalsIgnoreCase() method instead.

Make everything you can final, that way you know what you are dealing with.

import java.util.Scanner;

public class HelloWorld {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Scanner scanner = new Scanner(System.in);

        //Prompt for Enchantment Type
        System.out.println("Armor/Tool/Weapon");

        final int type;

        //Wait for response
        String input1 = scanner.nextLine();

        if("Armor".equalsIgnoreCase(input1)){
            type = 0;
        }
        else if("Tool".equalsIgnoreCase(input1)){
            int type = 1;
        }
        else if("Weapon".equalsIgnoreCase(input1)){
            type = 2;
        }
        else {
            type = 3;
        }

        //This is where I need to access the String type
        if(type == 1){

        }
    }
}

A better way to do this is to switch on an Enum type.

public enum Item
{
    ARMOR,
    TOOL,
    WEAPON
}

Then you can convert your input1 into the Item enum and switch on that.

final Item item = Item.valueOf(input1.toUpperCase());

switch(item) {
   case(ARMOR):
     // do stuff here 
     break;
   case(TOOL):
     // do stuff here 
     break;
   case(WEAPON):
     // do stuff here 
     break;
   default:
     // do something with unrecognized input

This removes the magic numbers that you have in your program right now.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Perhaps a good time to switch on a String. – Peter Lawrey Sep 9 '13 at 12:34
1  
@PeterLawrey Only from Java 7 on. – mvw Sep 9 '13 at 12:41

The scope of a variable is within the block it is defined in. So define the variable out of if blocks and use it.

int type = 0;
if(input1 == "Armor"){
}else if(input1 == "Tool"){
   type = 1;
 }
 else if(input1 == "Weapon"){
    type = 2;
  }
  else {
     type = 3;
  }

Note: Also use String equals method to compare strings instead of ==. Equals method checks whether the content of two strings are same, whereas == checks for objects equality.

Update your if and else blocks something like this:

int type = 0;
if("Armor".equals(input1)){
}else if("Tool".equals(input1){
   type = 1;
 }
 else if("Weapon".equals(input1)){
    type = 2;
  }
  else {
     type = 3;
  }
share|improve this answer
3  
No @captain, absolutely not. – Michael Piefel Sep 9 '13 at 12:36
3  
@captain No. That is completely wrong. – Doorknob Sep 9 '13 at 12:36

You should define the type outside the if condition

    int type = 0;
    if(("Armor".equalsIgnoreCase(input1)){
        type = 0;
    }
    else if("Tool".equalsIgnoreCase(input1)){
        type = 1;
    }
    else if("Weapon".equalsIgnoreCase(input1)){
        type = 2;
    }
    else {
       type = 3;
    }

    if(type == 4) {

    }
share|improve this answer
    
if loop ? No such thing... – jlordo Sep 9 '13 at 12:33
    
sorry... corrected it – sanbhat Sep 9 '13 at 12:34

your code has multiple errors.

  1. you should define the type variable outside of the loop
  2. you should compare Strings with equals

import java.util.Scanner;

public class HelloWorld {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Scanner scanner = new Scanner(System.in);



        //Prompt for Enchantment Type
        System.out.println("Armor/Tool/Weapon");

        //Wait for response
        String input1 = scanner.nextLine();
        int type;

        if(input1.equals("Armor")){
            type = 0;
        }
        else if(input1.equals("Tool")){
            type = 1;
        }
        else if(input1.equals("Weapon")){
            type = 2;
        }
        else {
            type = 3;
        }

        //This is where I need to access the String type
        if(type == 1){

        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
FYI, for some reason the list markdown broke your code block. I fixed it with a paragraph tag. – thegrinner Sep 9 '13 at 12:37
    
You need to assign a value to int type when you create it, or else it will generate an error, later in that code. – Vallentin Sep 9 '13 at 12:38
    
@Vallentin no it doesn't – Philipp Sander Sep 9 '13 at 12:42
    
If you write final int type then it won't generate an error, but if you just only write int type then your IDE will throw "The local variable type may not have been initialized" at you, so yes! – Vallentin Sep 9 '13 at 13:32
    
my eclipse doesn't. and there is no case when it is uninitialised – Philipp Sander Sep 9 '13 at 13:34

You are not supposed to access from out of scope. Just declare it in one of the enclosing scopes.

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