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I've got a class that implements Iterator with a ResultSet as a data member. Essentially the class looks like this:

public class A implements Iterator{
    private ResultSet entities;
    ...
    public Object next(){
        entities.next();
        return new Entity(entities.getString...etc....)
    }

    public boolean hasNext(){
        //what to do?
    }
    ...
}

How can I check if the ResultSet has another row so I can create a valid hasNext method since ResultSet has no hasNext defined itself? I was thinking doing SELECT COUNT(*) FROM... query to get the count and managing that number to see if there's another row but I'd like to avoid this.

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14 Answers 14

up vote 30 down vote accepted

This is really a bad idea. This approach requires that the connection is open the whole time until the last row is read and outside the DAO layer you never know when it will happen and you also seem to leave the resultset open and risk resource leaks and application crashes in the case the connection times out. You don't want to have that.

The normal JDBC practice is that you acquire Connection, Statement and ResultSet in the shortest possible scope. The normal practice is also that you map multiple rows into a List or maybe a Map and guess what, they do have an Iterator.

public List<Data> list() throws SQLException {
    Connection connection = null;
    Statement statement = null;
    ResultSet resultSet = null;
    List<Data> list = new ArrayList<Data>();

    try {
        connection = database.getConnection();
        statement = connection.createStatement("SELECT id, name, value FROM data");
        resultSet = statement.executeQuery();
        while (resultSet.next()) {
            Data data = new Data(); 
            data.setId(resultSet.getLong("id"));
            data.setName(resultSet.getString("name"));
            data.setValue(resultSet.getInteger("value"));
            list.add(data);
        }
    } finally {
        if (resultSet != null) try { resultSet.close(); } catch (SQLException logOrIgnore) {}
        if (statement != null) try { statement.close(); } catch (SQLException logOrIgnore) {}
        if (connection != null) try { connection.close(); } catch (SQLException logOrIgnore) {}
    }

    return list;
}

And use it as follows:

List<Data> list = dataDAO.list(); 
int count = list.size(); // Easy as that.
Iterator<Data> iterator = list.iterator(); // There is your Iterator.

Do not pass expensive DB resources outside the DAO layer like you initially wanted to do. For more basic examples of normal JDBC practices and the DAO pattern you may find this article useful.

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7  
Couldn't this run into memory issues depending on the number of rows? –  Jordan Messina Dec 9 '09 at 0:22
2  
Just query the information you actually need. In SQL you can use under each the WHERE and LIMIT/OFFSET clauses for this. Google also doesn't return all of the zillion results at once. –  BalusC Dec 9 '09 at 2:41
27  
What if I need all rows? I've got an app with 1,2 million rows that needs to be processed. –  heffaklump Apr 23 '10 at 9:58
2  
I don't see why this is such a bad idea in general. Iterators are very short-lived objects. Let your ResultSetIterator also implement AutoCloseable and the whole thing becomes quite lean... –  Lukas Eder Mar 3 at 15:39
2  
The lifecycle of a Statement / Connection is completely independent of the lifecycle of a ResultSet. This is of course assuming that anyone writing a ResultSetIterator knows what they're doing and won't let the Iterator escape the DAO or whatever entity manages the ResultSet lifecycle. And then, I still don't see why Iterator would be a bad type to represent a database cursor... –  Lukas Eder Mar 3 at 16:55

You can get out of this pickle by performing a look-ahead in the hasNext() and remembering that you did a lookup to prevent consuming too many records, something like:

public class A implements Iterator{
    private ResultSet entities;
    private boolean didNext = false;
    private boolean hasNext = false;
    ...
    public Object next(){
        if (!didNext) {
            entities.next();
        }
        didNext = false;
        return new Entity(entities.getString...etc....)
    }

    public boolean hasNext(){
        if (!didNext) {
            hasNext = entities.next();
            didNext = true;
        }
        return hasNext;
    }
    ...
}
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I think this solution is better than mine, since it has a smaller runtime fingerprint. –  ComSubVie Dec 8 '09 at 21:51

ResultSet has an 'isLast()' method that might suit your needs. The JavaDoc says it is quite expensive though since it has to read ahead. There is a good chance it is caching the look-ahead value like the others suggest trying.

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There are a couple of things you could do depending on what you want your class A. If the major use case is to go through every single result then perhaps its best to preload all the Entity objects and throw away the ResultSet.

If however you don't want to do that you could use the next() and previous() method of ResultSet

public boolean hasNext(){
       boolean next = entities.next();

       if(next) {

           //reset the cursor back to its previous position
           entities.previous();
       }
}

You do have to be careful to make sure that you arent currently reading from the ResultSet, but, if your Entity class is a proper POJO (or at least properly disconnected from ResultSet then this should be a fine approach.

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Its not a really bad idea in the cases where you need it, it's just that you often do not need it.

If you do need to do something like, say, stream your entire database.... you could pre-fetch the next row - if the fetch fails your hasNext is false.

Here is what I used:

/**
 * @author Ian Pojman <pojman@gmail.com>
 */
public abstract class LookaheadIterator<T> implements Iterator<T> {
    /** The predetermined "next" object retrieved from the wrapped iterator, can be null. */
    protected T next;

    /**
     * Implement the hasNext policy of this iterator.
     * Returns true of the getNext() policy returns a new item.
     */
    public boolean hasNext()
    {
        if (next != null)
        {
            return true;
        }

        // we havent done it already, so go find the next thing...
        if (!doesHaveNext())
        {
            return false;
        }

        return getNext();
    }

    /** by default we can return true, since our logic does not rely on hasNext() - it prefetches the next */
    protected boolean doesHaveNext() {
        return true;
    }

    /**
     * Fetch the next item
     * @return false if the next item is null. 
     */
    protected boolean getNext()
    {
        next = loadNext();

        return next!=null;
    }

    /**
     * Subclasses implement the 'get next item' functionality by implementing this method. Implementations return null when they have no more.
     * @return Null if there is no next.
     */
    protected abstract T loadNext();

    /**
     * Return the next item from the wrapped iterator.
     */
    public T next()
    {
        if (!hasNext())
        {
            throw new NoSuchElementException();
        }

        T result = next;

        next = null;

        return result;
    }

    /**
     * Not implemented.
     * @throws UnsupportedOperationException
     */
    public void remove()
    {
        throw new UnsupportedOperationException();
    }
}

then:

    this.lookaheadIterator = new LookaheadIterator<T>() {
        @Override
        protected T loadNext() {
            try {
                if (!resultSet.next()) {
                    return null;
                }

                // process your result set - I use a Spring JDBC RowMapper
                return rowMapper.mapRow(resultSet, resultSet.getRow());
            } catch (SQLException e) {
                throw new IllegalStateException("Error reading from database", e);
            }
        }
    };
}
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entities.next returns false if there are no more rows, so you could just get that return value and set a member variable to keep track of the status for hasNext().

But to make that work you would also have to have some sort of init method that reads the first entity and caches it in the class. Then when calling next you would need to return the previously cached value and cache the next value, etc...

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You could try the following:

public class A implements Iterator {
    private ResultSet entities;
    private Entity nextEntity;
    ...
    public Object next() {
        Entity tempEntity;
        if ( !nextEntity ) {
            entities.next();
            tempEntity = new Entity( entities.getString...etc....)
        } else {
            tempEntity = nextEntity;
        }

        entities.next();
        nextEntity = new Entity( entities.getString...ext....)

        return tempEntity;
    }

    public boolean hasNext() {
        return nextEntity ? true : false;
    }
}

This code caches the next entity, and hasNext() returns true, if the cached entity is valid, otherwise it returns false.

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I believe you mean return nextEntity != null; in your hasNext method –  Brad Mace Sep 21 '11 at 22:01

One option is the ResultSetIterator from the Apache DBUtils project.

BalusC rightly points out the the various concerns in doing this. You need to be very careful to properly handle the connection/resultset lifecycle. Fortunately, the DBUtils project also has solutions for safely working with resultsets.

If BalusC's solution is impractical for you (e.g. you are processing large datasets that can't all fit in memory) you might want to give it a shot.

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It sounds like you are stuck between either providing an inefficient implementation of hasNext or throwing an exception stating that you do not support the operation.

Unfortunately there are times when you implement an interface and you don't need all of the members. In that case I would suggest that you throw an exception in that member that you will not or cannot support and document that member on your type as an unsupported operation.

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Do you expect most of the data in your result set to actually be used? If so, pre-cache it. It's quite trivial using eg Spring

  List<Map<String,Object>> rows = jdbcTemplate.queryForList(sql);
  return rows.iterator();

Adjust to suit your taste.

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You can use ResultSetIterator, just put your ResultSet in the constructor.

ResultSet rs = ...    
ResultSetIterator = new ResultSetIterator(rs); 
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For your information, this class call 'isLast()' method. –  B. Broto Jan 9 '12 at 16:00

I agree with BalusC. Allowing an Iterator to escape from your DAO method is going to make it difficult to close any Connection resources. You will be forced to know about the connection lifecycle outside of your DAO, which leads to cumbersome code and potential connection leaks.

However, one choice that I've used is to pass a Function or Procedure type into the DAO method. Basically, pass in some sort of callback interface that will take each row in your result set.

For example, maybe something like this:

public class MyDao {

    public void iterateResults(Procedure<ResultSet> proc, Object... params)
           throws Exception {

        Connection c = getConnection();
        try {
            Statement s = c.createStatement(query);
            ResultSet rs = s.executeQuery();
            while (rs.next()) {
                proc.execute(rs);
            }

        } finally {
            // close other resources too
            c.close();
        }
    }

}


public interface Procedure<T> {
   void execute(T t) throws Exception;
}


public class ResultSetOutputStreamProcedure implements Procedure<ResultSet> {
    private final OutputStream outputStream;
    public ResultSetOutputStreamProcedure(OutputStream outputStream) {
        this.outputStream = outputStream;
    }

    @Override
    public void execute(ResultSet rs) throws SQLException {
        MyBean bean = getMyBeanFromResultSet(rs);
        writeMyBeanToOutputStream(bean);
    }    
}

In this way, you keep your database connection resources inside your DAO, which is proper. But, you are not necessarily required to fill a Collection if memory is a concern.

Hope this helps.

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I think there's enough decry over why it's a really bad idea to use ResultSet in an Iterator (in short, ResultSet maintains an active connection to DB and not closing it ASAP can lead to problems).

But in a different situation, if you're getting ResultSet (rs) and are going to iterate over the elements, but you also wanted to do something before the iteration like this:

if (rs.hasNext()) { //This method doesn't exist
    //do something ONCE, *IF* there are elements in the RS
}
while (rs.next()) {
    //do something repeatedly for each element
}

You can achieve the same effect by writing it like this instead:

if (rs.next()) {
    //do something ONCE, *IF* there are elements in the RS
    do {
        //do something repeatedly for each element
    } while (rs.next());
}
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Iterators are problematic for traversing ResultSets for reasons mentioned above but Iterator like behaviour with all the required semantics for handling errors and closing resources is available with reactive sequences (Observables) in RxJava. Observables are like iterators but include the notions of subscriptions and their cancellations and error handling.

The project rxjava-jdbc has implementations of Observables for jdbc operations including traversals of ResultSets with proper closure of resources, error handling and the ability to cancel the traversal as required (unsubscribe).

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