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How can you print sub-arrays in numpy the same way Matlab does? I have a 3 by 10000 array and I want to view the first 20 columns. In Matlab you can write

a=zeros(3,10000);
a(:,1:20)
  Columns 1 through 15

 0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0
 0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0
 0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0

  Columns 16 through 20

 0     0     0     0     0
 0     0     0     0     0
 0     0     0     0     0

However in Numpy

import numpy as np
set_printoptions(threshold=nan)
a=np.zeros((3,10000))
print a[:,0:20]
[[  0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.
    0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.
    0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.
    0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.]
 [  0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.
    0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.
    0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.
    0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.]
 [  0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.
    0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.
    0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.
    0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.   0.]]

As you can see numpy prints the first row, then the second row, then the third row. I would like it to maintain the column structure and not the row structure

Thank you very much

PS: One solution would be for example

print a[:,0:20].T
[[  0.   0.   0.]
 [  0.   0.   0.]
 [  0.   0.   0.]
 [  0.   0.   0.]
 [  0.   0.   0.]
 [  0.   0.   0.]
 [  0.   0.   0.]
 [  0.   0.   0.]
 [  0.   0.   0.]
 [  0.   0.   0.]
 [  0.   0.   0.]
 [  0.   0.   0.]
 [  0.   0.   0.]
 [  0.   0.   0.]
 [  0.   0.   0.]
 [  0.   0.   0.]
 [  0.   0.   0.]
 [  0.   0.   0.]
 [  0.   0.   0.]
 [  0.   0.   0.]]

but, would consume a lot more of space on screen than desired. it would be great if numpy had this option

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1  
If your array has few rows but many columns, and you don't mind seeing it printed a bit screwy, you can print the transverse of the array with print a.T. –  ari Sep 9 '13 at 15:34
1  
Also it seems that you must import numpy twice, once with from numpy import *; set_printoptions and nan are both from the numpy namespace. Are you using pylab mode in IPython by any chance? –  ari Sep 9 '13 at 15:38
1  
Well, there are two more (janky) solutions: you can either use the linewidth option in set_printoptions to increase how much horizontal space each row gets (e.g. np.set_printoptions(linewidth=200) ), or you can try melding CT Zhu's answer with set_string_function to return the array as you want. –  ari Sep 9 '13 at 16:02
    
I am using iPython notebook, I was doing from numpy import stuff but here I tried to make the code minimal and forgot. :) linewidth option works fine and I want to accept the solution, but the problem is that since I am using iPython notebook the notebook limits the width of the block as well as the output. So even though I am happy with the solutions provided, in the future if I want to display long views of the array I would love if there is an easy way to have numpy breaking the line automatically –  Nuno Calaim Sep 9 '13 at 18:05
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1 Answer

Does this give what you want?

>>> for item in a[:,0:20].T:
    print '\t'.join(map(str,item.tolist()))

Or this?

>>> for item in a[:,0:20]:
    print '\t'.join(map(str,item.tolist()))
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much for your time in aswering the question, but... it kind of works, I was looking more for a way to specify how I want numpy to print 2-D arrays. –  Nuno Calaim Sep 9 '13 at 15:29
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