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I want to do something like this:

tell application "Terminal"
  activate
  do script "ssh user@server.com"
  -- // write user's password
  -- // write some linux commands to remote server
end tell

For example to log in to the server, enter the password, and then login to mysql and select a DB.
I type that every day and it would be really helpful to bundle it into a script.

Also, is there a reference of what commands, properties, functions, etc. do applications (Terminal, Finder, etc) have available to use within Applescript? thanks!

EDIT: Let me clear this up: I don't want to do several 'do script' as I tried and doesn't work. I want to open a Terminal window, and then emulate a human typing in some characters and hitting enter. Could be passwords, could be commands, whatever, just sending chars to the Terminal which happens to be running ssh. I tried keystroke and doesn't seem to work.

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15 Answers 15

up vote 27 down vote accepted

First connect to the server and wait for 6 seconds (you can change that) and then execute whatever you need on the remote server using the same tab

tell application "Terminal"
   set currentTab to do script ("ssh user@server;")
   delay 6
   do script ("do something remote") in currentTab
end tell
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1  
will these wait for completion? I mean when does do script return? –  Paulo Casaretto Nov 7 '12 at 14:04

As EvanK stated each do script line will open a new window however you can run
two commands with the same do script by separating them with a semicolon. For example:

tell application "Terminal"
    do script "date;time"
end tell

But the limit appears to be two commands.

However, you can append "in window 1" to the do script command (for every do script after the first one) to get the same effect and continue to run as many commands as you need to in the same window:

tell application "Terminal"
    do script "date"
    do script "time" in window 1
    do script "who" in window 1
end tell


Note that I just used the who, date, and time command as an example...replace with whatever commands you need.

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“But the limit appears to be two commands.” Not at all. You can provide as many commands as the shell will accept, which is only limited by the total length of the line, not the number of commands. –  Chris Page Nov 3 '11 at 3:50

How about this? There's no need for key codes (at least in Lion, not sure about earlier), and a subroutine simplifies the main script.

The below script will ssh to localhost as user "me", enter password "myPassw0rd" after a 1 second delay, issue ls, delay 2 seconds, and then exit.

tell application "Terminal"
    activate
    my execCmd("ssh me@localhost", 1)
    my execCmd("myPassw0rd", 0)
    my execCmd("ls", 2)
    my execCmd("exit", 0)
end tell
on execCmd(cmd, pause)
    tell application "System Events"
        tell application process "Terminal"
            set frontmost to true
            keystroke cmd
            keystroke return
        end tell
    end tell
    delay pause
end execCmd
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Here's another way, but with the advantage that it launches Terminal, brings it to the front, and creates only one window.

I like this when I want to be neatly presented with the results of my script.

tell application "Terminal"
    activate
    set shell to do script "echo 1" in window 1
    do script "echo 2" in shell
    do script "echo 3" in shell
end tell
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I could be mistaken, but I think Applescript Terminal integration is a one-shot deal...That is, each do script call is like opening a different terminal window, so I don't think you can interact with it at all.

You could copy over the SSH public keys to prevent the password prompt, then execute all the commands joined together (warning: the following is totally untested):

tell application "Terminal"
    activate
    do script "ssh jdoe@example.com '/home/jdoe/dosomestuff.sh && /home/jdoe/dosomemorestuff.sh'"
end tell

Alternatively, you could wrap the ssh and subsequent commands in a shell script using Expect, and then call said shell script from your Applescript.

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2  
You can send a series of commands to one Terminal shell just by using multiple "do scripts". Append "in window 0" and they use the frontmost window I believe. –  martin clayton Dec 8 '09 at 23:07
    
No, it seems that do script actually tries to execute a script (as you would expect) which in some way is different than just sending the string to the terminal and hitting enter, because it didn't work as if I just entered the password. –  Petruza Dec 9 '09 at 14:26
    
what about do shell script ssh user:password@server.com to avoid the password prompt. –  stib Jan 12 '10 at 13:38
    
“…it seems that do script actually tries to execute a script (as you would expect) which in some way is different than just sending the string to the terminal and hitting enter…” No, it’s basically as if you had typed it…or more precisely, it’s as if you Pasted the text. You’re probably running into the issue that prompting for the password flushes input, so you need to wait for the prompt to appear before you send the password. But, as others have pointed out, don’t send your password, just arrange for automated authentication. –  Chris Page Nov 3 '11 at 3:54

set up passwordless ssh (ssh-keygen, then add the key to ~/.ssh/authorized_keys on the server). Make an entry in ~/.ssh/config (on your desktop), so that when you run ssh mysqlserver, it goes to user@hostname... Or make a shell alias, like gotosql, that expands to ssh user@host -t 'mysql_client ...' to start the mysql client interactively on the server.

Then you probably do need someone else's answer to script the process after that, since I don't know how to set startup commands for mysql.

At least that keeps your ssh password out of the script!

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Ok thanks. But the password was just an example, the point here is that I want to send several strings to the terminal, no matter if they're passwords, mysql commands or whatever. –  Petruza Dec 9 '09 at 14:16
    
Yeah, I got that. But we sysadmins hate it when people put their passwords into plain text files all over the place. –  Peter Cordes Dec 9 '09 at 18:39
    
:) Ok, thanks for the advice. But I'm the only user in my computer, and besides, the user and password I use to log to the ssh server is shared by a lot of employees all over the world so security doesn't look to be an issue for the company. –  Petruza Dec 9 '09 at 18:54
    
/facepalm. It doesn't matter that you're the only user. File permissions defend against other users on the same machine. It's viruses and other attack vectors into your account that are the concern. If pwning your machine gives direct access to the more-valuable server, that's a bad thing. –  Peter Cordes Dec 9 '09 at 18:58
1  
Yeah, sorry I got carried away with the sysadmin rant. My answer started as a suggestion for an alternative way to do what you want with just ssh features, but then I realized you needed to do a bunch of interactive stuff on the remote side, so it didn't end up being as helpful as I hoped, and then I got the rant rolling. I have used OS X, and I have scripted terminal sessions with mrxvt on Linux, but I haven't scripted OS X's terminal. Sorry for being a jerk. :( –  Peter Cordes Dec 12 '09 at 2:09

Petruza,

Instead of using keystroke use key code.
The following example should work for you.

tell application "System Events"
    tell application process "Terminal"
    	set frontmost to true
    	key code {2, 0, 17, 14}
    	keystroke return
    end tell
end tell

The above example will send the characters {d a t e} to Terminal and then
keystroke return will enter and run the command. Use the above example
with whatever key codes you need and you'll be able to do what you're trying to do.

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The last example get errors under 10.6.8 (Build 10K549) caused by the keyword "pause".

Replacing it by the word "wait" makes it work:

tell application "Terminal"
    activate
    my execCmd("ssh me@localhost", 1)
    my execCmd("myPassw0rd", 0)
    my execCmd("ls", 2)
    my execCmd("exit", 0)

on execCmd(cmd, wait)
    tell application "System Events"
       tell application process "Terminal"
       set frontmost to true
       keystroke cmd
       keystroke return
       end tell
    end tell
delay wait
end execCmd
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Your question is specifically about how to get Applescript to do what you want. But, for the particular example described, you might want to look into 'expect' as a solution.

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You don't need to "tell" Terminal to do anything. AppleScript can do shell scripts directly.

set theDir to "~/Desktop/"
do shell script "touch " & theDir &"SomeFile.txt"

or whatever ...

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Kinda related, you might want to look at Shuttle (http://fitztrev.github.io/shuttle/), it's a SSH shortcut menu for OSX.

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This is an amazing tool. Seriously.. –  TheBlackBenzKid Nov 13 at 10:28
    
Yup, I use it everyday - wonderful little app. –  Nathan Pitman Nov 17 at 15:16

what about something like this:

tell application "Terminal"

    activate
    do shell script "sudo dscl localhost -create /Local/Default/Hosts/cc.josmoe.com IPAddress 127.0.0.1"
    do shell script "sudo dscl localhost -create /Local/Default/Hosts/cc.josmos2.com IPAddress 127.0.0.1"

end tell
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As neat solution, try-

$ open -a /Applications/Utilities/Terminal.app  *.py

or

$ open -b com.apple.terminal *.py

For the shell launched, you can go to Preferences > Shell > set it to exit if no error.

That's it.

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Why don't use expect:

tell application "Terminal"
    activate
    set currentTab to do script ("expect -c 'spawn ssh user@IP; expect \"*?assword:*\"; send \"MySecretPass
\"; interact'")
end tell
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I built this script. It is in Yosemite and it is bash script using AppleScript to choose a list of users for SSH servers. Basically you define an IP and then the user names.. when the application launches it asks who you want to login in as.. the SSH terminal is launched and logged in prompting a password...

(***
 * --- --- --- --- ---
 * JD Sports Fashion plc
 * Apple Script
 * Khaleel Mughal
 * --- --- --- --- ---
 * #SHELLSTAGINGSSHBASH
 * --- --- --- --- ---
***)

set stagingIP to "192.162.999.999"

set faciaName to (choose from list {"admin", "marketing", "photography_cdn"})

if faciaName is false then
    display dialog "No facia was selected." with icon stop buttons {"Exit"} default button {"Exit"}
else
    set faciaName to (item 1 of faciaName)

    tell application "Terminal"
        activate
        do script "ssh " & faciaName & "@" & stagingIP & ""
    end tell

end if

I highly recommend though; Nathan Pickmans post above about Shuttle (http://fitztrev.github.io/shuttle/).. a very smart and simple application.

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