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I have the two equations below that relate to the model fitting and prediction algorithms of a naive bayes classifier.

  • I am trying to understand what line 6 of algorithm 3.2 is doing. I think it is trying to make the numbers "nicer" by doing the log-sum-exp trick, which I still don't understand fully. Could someone outline why this is/needs to be done? And specifically what the argument to the

    logsumexp(Li,:)
    means/is/reads as?

  • Also could someone give me a good notion of what the two values in line 8 of algorithm 3.1 is for? Are they basically initial offsets/biases to the Lic in algorithm 3.2?

enter image description here enter image description here

From Machine Learning A Probabilistic Prospective Author Kevin P. Murphy

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it would be good to cite your source as it is someone else's work you have quoted. –  TooTone Sep 9 '13 at 16:47
    
Sorry, credit added. –  user1311286 Sep 9 '13 at 16:53
    
Algorithm 3.2 doesn't have a line 8... –  Slater Tyranus Sep 9 '13 at 17:05
    
Edited question. –  user1311286 Sep 9 '13 at 17:15

1 Answer 1

Please see below. If you want more details of the mathematics involved you might be better off posting on cross-validated.

Could someone outline why the log-sum-exp trick is/needs to be done?

This is for numerical stability. If you search for "logsumexp" you will see several useful explanations. E.g., https://hips.seas.harvard.edu/blog/2013/01/09/computing-log-sum-exp, and log-sum-exp trick why not recursive. Essentially, the procedure avoids numerical error that can occur with numbers that are too big / too small.

specifically what the argument Li,: reads as

The i means take the ith row, and the : means take all values from that row. So, overall, Li,: means the ith row of L. The colon : is used in Matlab (and its open source derivative Octave) to mean "all indices" when subscripting vectors or matrices.

could someone give me a good notion of what the two values in line 8 of algorithm 3.1 is for?

enter image description here

This is the frequency that class C appears in the training examples.

enter image description here

Adding a hat indicates that this frequency is to be used as an estimate of the probability of class C appearing in the population as a whole. In terms of Naive Bayes, we can see these probabilities as priors.

And similarly...

enter image description here

An estimate of the probability of the jth feature appearing when you restrict your attention to class C. These are the conditional probabilities: P(j|c) = probability of seeing feature j given class c -- and the Naive in Naive Bayes means that we assume they are independent.


Note: the quotes from your question have been modified a little for clarity / convenience of exposition.


Edit in reply to your comment

  • Li,: is a vector
  • N is the no of training examples
  • D is the dimension of the data, i.e. the number of features (each feature is a column in the matrix x, whose rows are training examples).
  • What is Li,:? Each Li,c looks like the log of: the prior for class c times the product of all P(i|c), i.e. the product of conditional probabilities of seeing the features for example i given class c. Note that there are only two entries in the vector Li,:, one for each class (it's binary classification, so there are just two classes).

Using Bayes Theorem, the entries of Li,: can be interpreted as the logs of relative conditional probabilities of the training example i being in class c given the features of i (actually they're not relative probabilities, because they each need to be divided by the same constant, but we can safely ignore that).

I'm not sure about line 6 of algorithm 3.2. If all you need to do is figure out which class your training example belongs to, then to me it seems sufficient to omit line 6 and for line 7 use argmaxc Lic. Perhaps the author included line 6 because pic has a particular interpretation?

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So then is Li,: a list? Which we do the log sum of the exponents of. It is specifically a list of probabilities of seeing a specific feature per class? - Also, N is the number of features and D is the dimension of the data/features? –  user1311286 Sep 9 '13 at 18:40
    
Li,: is a vector, and N is the no of training examples. But I agree that D is the dimension of the data, i.e. the number of features (each feature is a column in the matrix x, whose rows are training examples). Re what is Li,:, each Lic looks like the prior for c times the conditional probabilities of seeing the features for example i given class c. Note that there are only two entries in the vector Li,:, one for each class (it's binary classification, so there are just two classes). –  TooTone Sep 9 '13 at 18:42
    
For some more on the maths, hopefully your book will give some context; alternatively you could post on cross-validated with what you've learnt here. (Also, I wrote some maths in stackoverflow.com/questions/17030793/…) –  TooTone Sep 9 '13 at 18:44
    
Li,: is a vector, of probabilities of..? I guess my issue is, in the algorithms Li,; is not defined as something, or accumulated into. - So Algorithm 3.2 might read "for each training example, for each class, for each feature, if the data is present in this feature increase the likelihood of this class"? How might the next two lines read? - In your post about does group mean the same thing as class? –  user1311286 Sep 9 '13 at 18:49
    
@BumSkeeter I think you're on roughly right lines here. I've updated my answer to make things clearer. And yes, you can read group for class in my post. Look at the last line: Lic is the log of the right-hand side of the last equation. Like I said in my answer, I'm not 100% sure of the point of line 6, because it doesn't seem to transform the vector in a way that's going to change which element of the vector is the largest. –  TooTone Sep 9 '13 at 19:11

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