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I have been reading about C for a while now and decided lets write a little add program, nothing fancy at all. My understanding of C headers is that they are "interfaces" (such as like java and other languages) but where you can also define variable that either have set values or not..

So I wrote this:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include "sample.h"

int main(int argc, char** argv) {
    printf("hello World\n");
    add(12, 18);
    return (EXIT_SUCCESS);
}

int add(int a, int b){
    int value = a+b;
    printf("value = %d\n", value);
    return 0;
}

It has a header file that looks like such:

#ifndef SAMPLE_H_GUARD
#define SAMPLE_H_GUARD
int add(int a, int b);
#endif

I thought header files, and this is where I am lost on their definition, was suppose to define the use of add, so all I would have to do is call add - From my understanding, I define the rules of add and then implement the functionality of add....

Also, A lot of the material I have read shows one header file for multiple C files. where as a lot of projects today have one header per one c, meaning Sample.h belongs to Sample.c and nothing else.

Can some one shed some light on this?

Could I have done this like so:

main.c

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include "sample.h"

int main(int argc, char** argv) {
    printf("hello World\n");
    add(12, 18);
    return (EXIT_SUCCESS);
}

add.c

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include "sample.h"
int add(int a, int b){
    int value = a+b;
    printf("value = %d\n", value);
    return 0;
}

sample.h

#ifndef SAMPLE_H_GUARD
#define SAMPLE_H_GUARD
int add(int a, int b);
#endif

I believe in the book I was reading: C Programming Language they had a calculator example split up like this, my question is how does C know where add is defined? It knows the rules for it based on the header file, i think, but not where the actual implementation is ....

There example where they split of the files like such doe not have something like #include "add.c" all they do is include the header file in the files that either implement or use this functionality.

Note: obviously the calculator example and my example are going to be different but fundamentally the same - for those who have the book. I am just lost on how to use header files effectively and efficiently.

share|improve this question
    
The linker worries about locating the definition. – krsteeve Sep 9 '13 at 16:50
    
You as the programmer have to tell the linker which object files and libraries to link, and between the object files and the libraries, you need to ensure that each function or variable that is referenced from the object files is also defined somewhere (another object file, or a library). Unless you have multiple source files, headers like sample.h are not really necessary — in the first example, you could make add() into a static function declared at the top of main.c and implemented at the bottom. – Jonathan Leffler Sep 9 '13 at 17:03
up vote 4 down vote accepted

A header file in C would declare the function add for those modules that need it, but not define the function. The function is still to be defined in its own module (e.g., in your case, add.c).

So in general, to make a function foo available to several modules, you would normally:

  • Choose a header file (maybe it's own if there are other associated defines, etc) to declare foo. For example, perhaps foo.h would have void foo(...);

  • In some module, perhaps foo.c, you would define the complete function foo.

  • In any module that wants to call foo, you would #include "foo.h" (or whatever header you used) and call the function.

  • When you compile/link the code, you would make sure all modules, including foo.o or whatever module has foo defined in it, were present.

A declaration, given in the header file, provides (of course) the function name, the function return type as well as listing all the parameters and their types. This is all the compiler needs to know to figure out how to call the function from the calling module. At link time, addresses are all resolved so that the modules then know exactly where the function is in its own particular module.

share|improve this answer
    
So it just knows? If I were to run this it would be like - where is this header file also called, lets look there for definitions ... ? – LogicLooking Sep 9 '13 at 16:51
    
@LogicLooking I'm not sure what you mean by "it just knows". You have to put the right pieces in the right places, as I indicated. The linking process makes sure that the symbol is properly accessible to all modules. The header file declaration gives the calling module everything it needs to know to call the function (return and parameter types). – lurker Sep 9 '13 at 16:54
    
as some one new to C this makes more sense. I was very confused on how header files could be used across multiple files and yet one file, main.c for example, could call all the various implementations of those defined in the header files. – LogicLooking Sep 9 '13 at 17:04
1  
@LogicLooking the only thing special about main.c is that it contains the C entry point function main. Other than that, all the same rules apply. It doesn't even have to be called main.c. You just have to have exactly one module somewhere that defines the function main as expected by the linker. – lurker Sep 9 '13 at 17:07
1  
@LogicLooking when you compile a .c file any symbols (function names, external variables) that are declared and used but not defined are noted as missing in the object file. When you link all of your object files together to create an executable, the linker notices these undefined symbols and searches through every other object file being linked to find the actual location of the definition. And if it can't, then you get symbol resolution errors from the linker. (The process is still the same if you are compiling and linking source to exe in the same command.) – tab Sep 9 '13 at 21:33

My understanding of C headers is that they are "interfaces" (such as like java and other languages) but where you can also define variable that either have set values or not..

This is not correct. You cannot "define" variables - well, you can but that will cause multiple definitions error while compiling code if you include header more than once.

Could I have done this like so:

Regarding your code - both variants are correct. C language uses headers to read declarations and hence headers are optional as well. You can have your code split into as many as you want .h and .c files. Compiler will create an object file for each .c file. All .h files included in a c file are basically embedded in that C file "before compilation" i.e. in preprocessing phase. Linker then comes in picture which combines objects to produce the executable.

Please don't hesitate if something is not clear in my answer.

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