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I am trying to use Hibernate with hbm2ddl.auto set to validate so that Hibernate must respect my DB schema, instead of auto-generating tables around my Java classes.

A lot of my tables are so-called "lookup" or "reference" tables, that essentially consist of id, name and tag fields:

credit_card_types
    credit_card_type_id           Ex: "12"
    credit_card_type_name         Ex: "Visa"
    credit_card_type_tag          Ex: "VISA"

payment_types
    payment_type_id               Ex: "2"
    payment_type_name             Ex: "Google Checkout"
    payment_type_tag              EX: "GOOGLE_CHECKOUT"

etc.

I'd like to model these as follows:

public class BaseLookup {
    private Long id;
    private String name;
    private String tag;

    // ...getters, setters and ctors, etc.
}

public class CreditCardTypes extends BaseLookup {
    // .. perhaps a few other fields, methods, etc...
}

public class PaymentTypes extends BaseLookup {
    // .. perhaps a few other fields, methods, etc...
}

The problem is I don't want Hibernate to search for (validate against) a lookups table: I want it to validate aginst 2 lookup tables called credit_card_types and payment_types respectively.

What annotations/configs do I need to allow this type of Java inheritance but to only create my 2 lookup tables (and not 3)? Thanks in advance!

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I think you can do this using hbm.xml but not using annotations. In Hbm.xml case, you can just act like you have only one entity and map CreditCardTypes and PaymentTypes like entities on a single class –  Plínio Pantaleão Sep 9 '13 at 18:37

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

For your base class you would add the following annotation:

@MappedSuperclass
public class BaseLookup implements Serializable {

    @Id
    @Column (name="ID")
    private Long id;

    @Column (name="NAME")
    private String name;

    @Column
    private String tag;

    // ...getters, setters and ctors, etc.
}

And for your children classes you would do the following:

@Table(name = "CREDITCARDTYPES")
public class CreditCardTypes extends BaseLookup {
   // .. perhaps a few other fields, methods, etc...

   @Coulmn (name="FIELD1_COLUMN_NAME")
   private String field1;
}

And you could do the second class in the same manner:

@Table(name = "PAYMENTTYPES")
public class PaymentTypes extends BaseLookup {
   // .. perhaps a few other fields, methods, etc...

   @Coulmn (name="FIELD2_COLUMN_NAME")
   private String field2;
}
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Thanks @fujy (+1) - however how do I specify that PaymentTypes#id gets mapped to a field called payment_type_id, and that CreditCardTypes#id gets mapped to a field called credit_card_type_id? –  user1768830 Sep 9 '13 at 19:44
    
Both table would have a primary key called id, If I understand you correctly, you want to make a unique primary key name for each table, right? –  fujy Sep 9 '13 at 19:48
    
Almost @fujy, but not quite - I'd like my credit_card_types table to have a primary key called credit_card_type_id, and my payment_types table to have a primary key called payment_type_id. –  user1768830 Sep 9 '13 at 19:49
    
Just move the Id field on the child class, and add the column name that you want as the example in the answer –  fujy Sep 9 '13 at 21:45

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