Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following query:

select d.restaurant_id, restaurant_category, dish_name, cuisine_id, count(ingredient_id)
  from restaurant r, dish d, composition c
 where r.restaurant_id = d.restaurant_id 
   and d.restaurant_id = c.restaurant_id 
   and d.dish_id = c.dish_id
group by d.restaurant_id
having count(distinct cuisine_id) > 1;

The tables are the following:

  • restaurant(restaurant_id, restaurant_category)
  • dish(restaurant_id, dish_name, dish_id, cuisine_id)
  • composition(restaurant_id, dish_id, ingredient_id)

The query it's returning only one row when it should be returning 3. Any ideas?

share|improve this question
2  
is this homework? –  richardtallent Dec 8 '09 at 22:58
    
That can only be MySQL - only db I know to allow "hidden" values in the group by: dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/group-by-hidden-columns.html –  OMG Ponies Dec 8 '09 at 23:01
1  
Can you append EXPLAIN EXTENDED before your query and paste the output in the question prompt? –  Dan Dec 8 '09 at 23:04
1  
You'll have to provide example data to demonstrate why rows should or should not be turning up in the resultset. –  OMG Ponies Dec 8 '09 at 23:07

3 Answers 3

Suggestion #1, use SQL92 style joins. Suggestion #2, use an alias in all of your column names Suggestion #3, if you want a distinct cuisine_id then make that part of the aggregate.

The main problem here is that your group by is incorrect. All columns that are not part of the aggregate function must appear in the GROUP BY clause. I'm surprised your database ran this.

Here is what it should look like:

SELECT 
    d.restaurant_id, 
    cuisine_id, 
    Count(ingredient_id)  
FROM restaurant r
INNER JOIN dish d ON r.restaurant_id = d.restaurant_id
INNER JOIN composition c ON d.restaurant_id = c.restaurant_id AND d.dish_id = c.dish_id
GROUP BY d.restaurant_id, cuisine_id
HAVING Count(distinct(cuisine_id)) > 1

OR

SELECT 
    d.restaurant_id, 
    restaurant_category, 
    dish_name, 
    cuisine_id, 
    Count(ingredient_id)  
FROM restaurant r
INNER JOIN dish d ON r.restaurant_id = d.restaurant_id
INNER JOIN composition c ON d.restaurant_id = c.restaurant_id AND d.dish_id = c.dish_id
GROUP BY d.restaurant_id, restaurant_category, dish_name, cuisine_id, 
HAVING Count(distinct(cuisine_id)) > 1

If you need all of those columns then you will need to do this as a sub-query.

share|improve this answer

Were this SQL Server, I would say you have an error in your GROUP BY clause. Try:

SELECT d.restaurant_id, restaurant_category, dish_name, cuisine_id, COUNT(ingredient_id)
FROM restaurant r, dish d, composition c
WHERE r.restaurant_id = d.restaurant_id
  AND d.restaurant_id = c.restaurant_id
  AND d.dish_id = c.dish_id
GROUP BY d.restaurant_id, restaurant_category, dish_name, cuisine_id
HAVING COUNT(DISTINCT cuisine_id) > 1;
share|improve this answer

You can't use an aggregate function like that in a join. You need to wrap that in a sub query or something.

share|improve this answer
1  
No, it's perfectly fine to use an aggregate on a JOIN'd table. –  OMG Ponies Dec 8 '09 at 23:06

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.