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I'm trying to assign a member function to a pointer to a member function in C++, but I am getting an error. I have code like this:

#ifndef MY_CLASS_H
#define MY_CLASS_H

class MyClass {
    MyClass* (MyClass::*memPtr_) (ParamType);
public:
    void myFunction();
    void myFunction2();
    void myFunction3();

    MyClass& foo(ParamType var);
    MyClass& bar(ParamType var);
    MyClass& fooBar(ParamType var);
    ...
};

#endif

and...

void MyClass::myFunction() {
    memPtr_ = &MyClass::foo;

...

void MyClass::myFunction2() {
    memPtr_ = &MyClass::bar;

...

void MyClass::myFunction3() {
    memPtr_ = &MyClass::fooBar;

...

And on the lines

memPtr_ = &MyClass::foo;

and

memPtr_ = &MyClass::bar;

and

memPtr_ = &MyClass::fooBar;

when I compile - I get the error:

"cannot convert 'MyClass& (MyClass::*)(ParamType)'
to MyClass* (MyClass::*)(ParamType)' in assignment."

I've searched - but I can't seem to find the solution to this problem - what is the correct syntax to assign a member function to the pointer to member function 'memPtr_'?

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1  
So what do you think foo and bar should return? A MyClass&, nothing (void) or something else? That seems to be the problem in your code. –  Mats Petersson Sep 9 '13 at 18:54
1  
The syntax is fine. The problem is that you've got mismatching types. The error message says your functions return MyClass& while memPtr_ has MyClass* return type. –  jrok Sep 9 '13 at 18:55
    
@Mats Petersson: Sorry, there were some errors in the sample code. Foo, bar, and foobar should have returned MyClass&. –  user1296259 Sep 9 '13 at 19:01
    
@Jrok Thanks, you're correct, and I fixed the problem. –  user1296259 Sep 9 '13 at 19:08
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2 Answers

Jrok is correct, and I fixed the problem. I simply changed:

MyClass* (MyClass::*memPtr_) (ParamType);

to...

MyClass& (MyClass::*memPtr_) (ParamType);

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You don't take the address of a function name with no (), that's the pointer.

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