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There are n possible unique events that can occur at m different times:

time    event
0       A
1       A C
2       A B
3       A
4       B C
5       B C
6       A
7       B

A tally of how many times an event happened is stored into a set of n vectors of size m:

A vector: {1,2,3,4,4,4,5,5}
B vector: {0,0,1,1,2,3,3,4}
C vector: {0,1,1,1,2,3,3,3}

What I'm wondering is how I can efficiently display the vectors in the form of a stacked bar graph. I tried matplotlib (have little python experience) and followed this example: http://matplotlib.org/examples/pylab_examples/bar_stacked.html

I did get a bar graph working, but the amount of memory the program uses is too much. In my program I had 11 event vectors each of size ~25000. For some reason, the application will use over 5GB of memory.

Could the issue be the way I wrote the script or is python simply abusing memory? I'm also open to the idea of using Mathematica or MATLAB if it can do the job better.


EDIT 1

Here is some working code:

#!/usr/bin/env python
# a stacked bar plot with errorbars
import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import sys, string, os

# Initialize time count
nTimes = 0

# Initialize event counts
nA = 0
nB = 0
nC = 0
nD = 0
nE = 0
nF = 0
nG = 0
nH = 0
nI = 0
nJ = 0
nK = 0

# Initialize event vectors
A_Vec = []
B_Vec = []
C_Vec = []
D_Vec = []
E_Vec = []
F_Vec = []
G_Vec = []
H_Vec = []
I_Vec = []
J_Vec = []
K_Vec = []

# Check for command-line argument
if (len(sys.argv) < 2):
    exit()

# Open file
with open(sys.argv[1]) as infile:
    # For every line in the data file...
    for line in infile:
        # Split up tokens
        tokens = line.split(" ")
        # Get the current time
        cur_time = int(tokens[1])

        # Fill in in-between values
        for time in range(len(A_Vec),cur_time):
            A_Vec.append(nA)
            B_Vec.append(nB)
            C_Vec.append(nC)
            D_Vec.append(nD)
            E_Vec.append(nE)
            F_Vec.append(nF)
            G_Vec.append(nG)
            H_Vec.append(nH)
            I_Vec.append(nI)
            J_Vec.append(nJ)
            K_Vec.append(nK)

        # Figure add event type and add result
        if (tokens[2] == 'A_EVENT'):
            nA += 1
        elif (tokens[2] == 'B_EVENT'):
            nB += 1
        elif (tokens[2] == 'C_EVENT'):
            nC += 1
        elif (tokens[2] == 'D_EVENT'):
            nD += 1
        elif (tokens[2] == 'E_EVENT'):
            nE += 1
        elif (tokens[2] == 'F_EVENT'):
            nF += 1
        elif (tokens[2] == 'G_EVENT'):
            nG += 1
        elif (tokens[2] == 'H_EVENT'):
            nH += 1
        elif (tokens[2] == 'I_EVENT'):
            nI += 1
        elif (tokens[2] == 'J_EVENT'):
            nJ += 1
        elif (tokens[2] == 'K_EVENT'):
            nK += 1

        if(cur_time == nTimes):
            A_Vec[cur_time] = nA
            B_Vec[cur_time] = nB
            C_Vec[cur_time] = nC
            D_Vec[cur_time] = nD
            E_Vec[cur_time] = nE
            F_Vec[cur_time] = nF
            G_Vec[cur_time] = nG
            H_Vec[cur_time] = nH
            I_Vec[cur_time] = nI
            J_Vec[cur_time] = nJ
            K_Vec[cur_time] = nK
        else:
            A_Vec.append(nA)
            B_Vec.append(nB)
            C_Vec.append(nC)
            D_Vec.append(nD)
            E_Vec.append(nE)
            F_Vec.append(nF)
            G_Vec.append(nG)
            H_Vec.append(nH)
            I_Vec.append(nI)
            J_Vec.append(nJ)
            K_Vec.append(nK)
        # Update time count
        nTimes = cur_time

# Set graph parameters
ind = np.arange(nTimes+1)
width = 1.00
vecs = [A_Vec,B_Vec,C_Vec,D_Vec,E_Vec,F_Vec,G_Vec,H_Vec,I_Vec,J_Vec,K_Vec]
tmp_accum = np.zeros(len(vecs[0]))

# Create bars
pA      =   plt.bar(ind, A_Vec, color='#848484',    edgecolor = "none", width=1)
tmp_accum += vecs[0]
pB      =   plt.bar(ind, B_Vec, color='#FF0000',    edgecolor = "none", width=1,    bottom=tmp_accum)
tmp_accum += vecs[1]
pC      =   plt.bar(ind, C_Vec, color='#04B404',    edgecolor = "none", width=1,    bottom=tmp_accum)
tmp_accum += vecs[2]
pD      =   plt.bar(ind, D_Vec, color='#8904B1',    edgecolor = "none", width=1,    bottom=tmp_accum)
tmp_accum += vecs[3]
pE      =   plt.bar(ind, E_Vec, color='#FFBF00',    edgecolor = "none", width=1,    bottom=tmp_accum)
tmp_accum += vecs[4]
pF      =   plt.bar(ind, F_Vec, color='#FF0080',    edgecolor = "none", width=1,    bottom=tmp_accum)
tmp_accum += vecs[5]
pG      =   plt.bar(ind, G_Vec, color='#0404B4',    edgecolor = "none", width=1,    bottom=tmp_accum)
tmp_accum += vecs[6]
pH      =   plt.bar(ind, H_Vec, color='#E2A9F3',    edgecolor = "none", width=1,    bottom=tmp_accum)
tmp_accum += vecs[7]
pI      =   plt.bar(ind, I_Vec, color='#A9D0F5',    edgecolor = "none", width=1,    bottom=tmp_accum)
tmp_accum += vecs[8]
pJ      =   plt.bar(ind, J_Vec, color='#FFFF00',    edgecolor = "none", width=1,    bottom=tmp_accum)
tmp_accum += vecs[9]
pK      =   plt.bar(ind, K_Vec, color='#58ACFA',    edgecolor = "none", width=1,    bottom=tmp_accum)

# Add up event count
nEvents = nA+nB+nC+nD+nE+nF+nG+nH+nI+nJ+nK
print 'nEvents = ' + str(nEvents)
# Add graph labels
plt.title('Events/Time Count')
plt.xlabel('Times')
plt.xticks(np.arange(0, nTimes+1, 1))
plt.ylabel('# of Events')
plt.yticks(np.arange(0,nEvents,1))
plt.legend( (pA[0],pB[0],pC[0],pD[0],pE[0],pF[0],pG[0],pH[0],pI[0],pJ[0],pK[0]), ('A','B','C','D','E','F','G','H','I','J','K') , loc='upper left')

plt.show()

Here is an example input file:

TIME 5 A_EVENT 
TIME 6 B_EVENT 
TIME 6 C_EVENT 
TIME 7 A_EVENT 
TIME 7 A_EVENT 
TIME 7 D_EVENT 
TIME 8 E_EVENT 
TIME 8 J_EVENT 
TIME 8 A_EVENT 
TIME 8 A_EVENT 

Here is the result: enter image description here

The program is executed like so: python tally_events.py input.txt


EDIT 2

import numpy as np
from itertools import cycle
from collections import defaultdict
from matplotlib import pyplot as plt
import sys, string, os

# Check for command-line argument
if (len(sys.argv) < 2):
    exit()

# Get values from input file
d = defaultdict(lambda : [0]*100000)
with open(sys.argv[1], 'r') as infile:
    for line in infile:
        tokens = line.rstrip().split(" ")
        time = int(tokens[1])
        event = tokens[2]
        d[event][time] += 1

# Get all event keys
names = sorted(d.keys())
# Initialize overall total value
otot = 0
# For every event name
for k in names:
    # Reinitalize tot
    tot = 0
    # For every time for event 
    for i in range(0,time+1):
        tmp = d[k][i]
        d[k][i] += tot
        tot += tmp
    otot += tot

vecs = np.array([d[k] for k in names])

# Plot it
fig = plt.figure()
ax = fig.add_subplot(111)

params = {'edgecolor':'none', 'width':1}
colors = cycle(['#848484', '#FF0000', '#04B404', '#8904B1', '#FFBF00', '#FF0080', '#0404B4', '#E2A9F3', '#A9D0F5', '#FFFF00', '#58ACFA'])

ax.bar(range(100000), vecs[0],  facecolor=colors.next(), label=names[0], **params)
for i in range(1, len(vecs)):
    ax.bar(range(100000), vecs[i], bottom=vecs[:i,:].sum(axis=0), 
           facecolor=colors.next(), label=names[i], **params)

ax.set_xticks(range(time+1))
ax.set_yticks(range(otot+1))
ax.legend(loc='upper left')

plt.show()

enter image description here

share|improve this question
    
Since you already wrote the script in python, can we see the relevant plotting parts? –  Bill Sep 9 '13 at 20:53
    
@Bill I have updated the question with some code, an input file, and an output plot. –  sj755 Sep 9 '13 at 21:32
3  
This code is painful to read. You can probably reduce this to < 15 lines with dicts. I suspect your memory leak is in your file processing, not in the matplotlib. –  tcaswell Sep 9 '13 at 22:52
    
If one of the answers solved your problem, please accept it. –  tcaswell Sep 10 '13 at 13:06
1  
also, numpy is your friend. –  tcaswell Sep 10 '13 at 13:17

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I see, I did not fully grasp the fact that you are trying to make ~1M bars which is very memory intensive. I would suggest something like this:

import numpy as np
from itertools import izip, cycle
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
from collections import defaultdict

N = 100

fake_data = {}
for j in range(97, 104):
    lab = chr(j)
    fake_data[lab] = np.cumsum(np.random.rand(N) > np.random.rand(1))

colors = cycle(['r', 'g', 'b', 'm', 'c', 'Orange', 'Pink'])

# fig, ax = plt.subplots(1, 1, tight_layout=True) # if your mpl is newenough
fig, ax = plt.subplots(1, 1) # other wise
ax.set_xlabel('time')
ax.set_ylabel('counts')
cum_array = np.zeros(N*2 - 1) # to keep track of the bottoms
x = np.vstack([arange(N), arange(N)]).T.ravel()[1:] # [0, 1, 1, 2, 2, ..., N-2, N-2, N-1, N-1]
hands = []
labs = []
for k, c in izip(sorted(fake_data.keys()), colors):
    d = fake_data[k]
    dd = np.vstack([d, d]).T.ravel()[:-1]  # double up the data to match the x values [x0, x0, x1, x1, ... xN-2, xN-1]
    ax.fill_between(x, dd + cum_array, cum_array,  facecolor=c, label=k, edgecolor='none') # fill the region
    cum_array += dd                       # update the base line
    # make a legend entry
    hands.append(matplotlib.patches.Rectangle([0, 0], 1, 1, color=c)) # dummy artist
    labs.append(k)                        # label

ax.set_xlim([0, N - 1]) # set the limits 
ax.legend(hands, labs, loc=2)             #add legend
plt.show()                                #make sure it shows

for N=100:

N=100 demo

for N=100000:

N=100000

This uses ~few hundred megs.

As a side note, the data parsing could be be further simplified to this:

import numpy as np
from itertools import izip
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
from collections import defaultdict

# this requires you to know a head of time how many times you have
len = 10
d = defaultdict(lambda : np.zeros(len, dtype=np.bool)) # save space!
with open('test.txt', 'r') as infile:
    infile.next() # skip the header line
    for line in infile:
        tokens = line.rstrip().split(" ")
        time = int(tokens[0]) # get the time which is the first token
        for e in tokens[1:]:  # loop over the rest
            if len(e) == 0:
                pass
            d[e][time] = True

for k in d:
    d[k] = np.cumsum(d[k])

not strictly tested, but I think it should work.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry for the late reply. I used Bill's code and modified it slightly. The code I am using now is posted in a second edit. I tested his script with an input file where each event vector can have up to 100000 entries. This test file has 5 different events. What I've found is that python uses ~10GB of memory, however most of that memory is taken during calls to the bar function. Is there any way to reduce the memory usage, or is this simply how the bar function works? –  sj755 Sep 10 '13 at 22:55
    
@sj755 Please see my most recent edit –  tcaswell Sep 11 '13 at 1:29
    
I'll try out your method and report back. Thanks for the help. –  sj755 Sep 11 '13 at 1:36
    
I get the following error when running your example code: TypeError: __init__() got an unexpected keyword argument 'tight_layout' –  sj755 Sep 11 '13 at 15:40
    
@sj755 Then remove it. I am apparently using a newer mpl than you are. –  tcaswell Sep 11 '13 at 15:50

Given the input data you posted, the plot you posted is wrong. For example, 'A_EVENT' does not appear at TIME 6, so the gray box at x=6 in your plot shouldn't be there.

Anyway, I had to rewrite the code. As @tcaswell mentioned, it was painful to read. Here is a simpler version.

import numpy as np
from itertools import cycle
from collections import defaultdict
from matplotlib import pyplot as plt

# Get values from 'test.txt'
d = defaultdict(lambda : [0]*10)
with open('test.txt', 'r') as infile:
    for line in infile:
        tokens = line.rstrip().split(" ")
        time = int(tokens[1])
        event = tokens[2]
        d[event][time] += 1

names = sorted(d.keys())
vecs = np.array([d[k] for k in names])

# Plot it
fig = plt.figure()
ax = fig.add_subplot(111)

params = {'edgecolor':'none', 'width':1}
colors = cycle(['r', 'g', 'b', 'm', 'c', 'Orange', 'Pink'])

ax.bar(range(10), vecs[0],  facecolor=colors.next(), label=names[0], **params)
for i in range(1, len(vecs)):
    ax.bar(range(10), vecs[i], bottom=vecs[:i,:].sum(axis=0), 
           facecolor=colors.next(), label=names[i], **params)

ax.set_xticks(range(10))
ax.set_yticks(range(10))
ax.legend(loc='upper left')

plt.show()

which yields the dictionary d

[('A_EVENT', [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 2, 2, 0]), 
 ('B_EVENT', [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0]), 
 ('D_EVENT', [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0]), 
 ('J_EVENT', [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0]), 
 ('C_EVENT', [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0]), 
 ('E_EVENT', [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0])]

and the vectors vecs

[[0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 2 0]
 [0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0]
 [0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0]
 [0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0]
 [0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0]
 [0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0]]

and the figure enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry about the poor code, I have next to no python experience. I also should have explained the problem a bit more in detail. The plot I posted was corrected. For example, A_Vec[t] is supposed to contain how many A events happened so far at time t. This means that A_Vec[t] <= A_Vec[t+1] for all times t. This was the reason I kept count of how many A, B, ..., K events happened. However, your answer is extremely helpful. I'll see how many memory your implementation uses and report back. –  sj755 Sep 10 '13 at 1:21
    
You just need to throw a np.cumsum around the vectors you have. You can probably also get away with using dytpe=np.bool on your inner arrays. (if you make them numpy arrays) as there you only ever be 0 or 1 hits per event type per time (if I understood correctly) –  tcaswell Sep 10 '13 at 5:01
    
also, I am not convinced that your loop over the input file is doing what you want (how is it handling multiple events and shouldn't the time be in tokens[0]?) –  tcaswell Sep 10 '13 at 5:04
    
@tcaswell Given the limited amount of info at the time of posting, I tried to make sense of the sample input file OP posted. Each line reads TIME N *_EVENT, so the only usable data I could see were columns 1 and 2. I figured the file contained events that occurred within time bins, or something similar, so within time bin 5 there was only 1 event, EVENT_A. –  Bill Sep 10 '13 at 15:30
    
Additionally, regardless of whether the data is read 100% correctly, it shows OP how to clean up his code considerably and demonstrates some data structures, etc. that he can use for his particular use case. –  Bill Sep 10 '13 at 15:31

matplotlib can cause memory leaks if plots are not closed properly. this gist explains the alternatives. Without your code it is difficult to say what your problem is.

share|improve this answer
    
I have updated my question with code, an input file, and a displayed plot. –  sj755 Sep 9 '13 at 21:33

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