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I am trying to join two tables based on whether or not a string from the first table is contained in part of a long string in the second table. I am using PROC SQL in SAS, but could also use a data step instead of a SQL query.

This code works fine on smaller datasets, but rapidly gets bogged down since it has to make a ton of comparisons. It would be fine if it were a simple equality check, but having to use the index() function makes it tough.

proc sql noprint;
  create table matched as
  select A.*, B.* 
  from  search_notes as B,
        names as A
  where index(B.notes,A.first) or 
        index(B.notes,A.last)
  order by names.name, notes.id;
quit;
run;

B.notes is a 2000 character (sometimes fully populated) block of text, and I am looking for any result that contains either the first or last name from A.

I don't think I get any speed advantage from doing it in two steps since it already has to compare every line of A with every line of B (so checking for both the first and last name isn't the bottleneck).

When I run it, I get NOTE: The execution of this query involves performing one or more Cartesian product joins that can not be optimized. in my log. Running it with A=4000 observations and B=100,000 observations takes 30 minutes to produce ~1000 matches.

Is there any way to optimize this?

share|improve this question
    
to make this more SQL-like, I tried adding % before and after A.First and A.Last and then using where B.notes LIKE A.first and that produced the same note and same long runtime. I hoped that using the SQL feature instead of the SAS function would allow it to optimize, but I guess not. –  otto Sep 9 '13 at 23:49
    
Are you trying to do a left or inner join, or truly a cartesian product? Do you just want the data from B joined onto A when B.NOTES contains either of the fields? –  DomPazz Sep 10 '13 at 0:29
    
Yeah, I just want the set of results where the fields from A are included in B.notes (accepting that there may be multiple results on either side since multiple things could match) –  otto Sep 10 '13 at 0:34
    
Ok. Let me play around with it. This is a tricky one. It is a problem in any SQL processor, not just SAS. –  DomPazz Sep 10 '13 at 0:40
    
If it makes it easier, I can ensure that both A.first and A.last are unique in A (both individually unique and thus all are also unique combinations) –  otto Sep 10 '13 at 0:44

3 Answers 3

The Cartesian product might be best for your data but here is something to try. What I am doing is using CALL EXECUTE() in a data step to build the step matching into a data step. This means you only have to tranverse each table once. However, you will have 4000 IF/THEN clauses in your written data step. Doing this brings the runtime on my example data from 55 seconds to 40 seconds. That would represent about 24 minutes down from your 30 minutes if the ratio holds.

I would leave this question open. Maybe someone can come up with a better method.

%let n=50;
data B;
format notes $&n..;
choose = "ABCDEFGHIJLKMNOPQRSTUVWXYZabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz0123456789";
do j=1 to 9000000;
    notes = "";
    do i=1 to floor(5 + ranuni(123)*(&n-5));
        r = floor(ranuni(123)*62+1);
        notes = catt(notes,substr(choose,r,1));

    end;
    output;
    drop r choose i;
end;
run;

data a;
choose = "ABCDEFGHIJLKMNOPQRSTUVWXYZabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz0123456789";
format first last $2.;
do i=1 to 62 by 2;
    first = strip(substr(choose,i,1));
    first = catt(first,first);
    last =  strip(substr(choose,i+1,1));
    last = catt(last,last);
    output;
end;
drop choose ;
run;

proc sql noprint;
  create table matched as
  select A.*, B.* 
  from  B as B,
        A as A
  where index(B.notes,A.first) or 
        index(B.notes,A.last)
  order by B.notes, a.i;
quit;

options nosource;
data _null_;
set a end=l;
if _n_ = 1 then do;
    call execute("data matched2; set B;");
    call execute("format First Last $2. i best.;");
end;

format outStr $200.;
outStr = "if index(notes,'" || first || "') or index(notes,'" || last || "') then do;";
call execute(outStr);

outStr = "first = '" || first || "';";
call execute(outStr);
outStr = "last = '" || last || "';";
call execute(outStr);
outStr = "i = " || i || ";";
call execute(outStr);
call execute("output; end;");

if l then do;
    call execute("run;");
end;
run;

proc sort data=matched2;
by notes i;
run;
share|improve this answer

This doesn't not sound like a good candidate for PROC SQL. If I understand correctly, you want to compare every row in search_notes against every row in names (hence a Cartesian product). A more traditional data step program might be easier to understand and perhaps more efficient:

data matched;
   set search_notes;
   do _i_=1 to nobs;
      set names point=_i_ nobs=nobs;
      if index(notes,first) 
      or index(notes,last) then output;
      end;
   drop _i_;
run;
proc sort data=matched;
   by vendor_name, claimant_id;
run;
share|improve this answer
    
This will probably perform no better and maybe worse than the SQL solution. This is equivalent to what I did, but I flattened the inner loop to reduce overhead. –  DomPazz Sep 10 '13 at 2:12
up vote 0 down vote accepted

This is a partial answer that makes it run 4-5X faster, but it isn't ideal (it helps in my case, but wouldn't necessarily work in the general case of optimizing a Cartesian product join).

I originally had 4 separate index() statements like in my example (my simplified sample had 2 for A.first and A.last).

I was able to refactor all 4 of those index() statements (plus a 5th I was going to add) into a regular expression that solves the same problem. It won't return an identical result set, but I think it actually returns better results than the 5 separate indexes since you can specify word edges.

In the datastep where I clean the names for matching, I create the following pattern:

pattern = cats('/\b(',substr(upcase(first_name),1,1),'|',upcase(first_name),').?\s?',upcase(last_name),'\b/');

This should create a regex along the lines of /\b(F|FIRST).?\s?LAST\b/ which will match anything like F. Last, First Last, flast@email.com, etc (there are combinations that it doesn't pick up, but I was only concerned with combinations that I observe in my data). Using '\b' also doesn't allow things where FLAST happens to be the same as the start/end of a word (such as "Edward Lo" getting matched to "Eloquent") which I find hard to avoid with index()

Then I do my sql join like this:

proc sql noprint;
create table matched as
  select  B.*, 
          prxparse(B.pattern) as prxm, 
          A.* 
  from  search_text as A,
        search_names as B
  where prxmatch(calculated prxm,A.notes)
  order by A.id;
quit;
run;

Being able to compile the regex once per name in B, and then run it on each piece of text in A seems to be dramatically faster than a couple of index statements (not sure about the case of a regex vs a single index).

Running it with A=250,000 Obs and B=4,000 Obs, took something like 90 minutes of CPU time for the index() method, while doing the same with prxmatch() took only 20 minutes of CPU time.

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