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I'm new to stackoverflow, so please be gentle. I am having severe trouble with the syntax of my SQL. The bottom line is that I want to copy from one table to another with no duplicates. I was going to compare two fields and only insert if there's a NULL for field1 in the destinationTB.

Please know that I'm novice at SQL statements, so any expanded knowledge would be helpful... such as can I use variables. I got the initial statement from stackoverflow research, but was unable to complete it.

Here's what I have, and thank you for the help:

 INSERT INTO destinationTB
 SELECT sourceTB.field1, destinationTB.field1
 FROM sourceTB
 LEFT JOIN destinationTB
 ON sourceTB.field1 = destinationTB.field1
 WHERE destinationTB.field1 IS NULL;

----- REVISED QUESTION -----

Thank you for the tips! I will try to revise the question (and future questions) to be more understandable, and my apologies for the awkward 'new-kid' smell in my last question.

The end result that I'm looking for is to copy from one table to another without duplicates. There are two tables that I'm working with. The first is the destinationTB, which has four fields, only one of which I would like to populate. The second table is sourceTB, which has multiple fields, but only one of which I need to get information from. My plan was to start the INSERT into the destinationTB. Since the first value wasn't in there, it should report back as NULL. After the first insert was accomplished, and the string was still running against the same values that now existed, it would no longer report NULL and would move on until it found another value that wasn't in the destinationTB.

As an example, let's take a TV. There are multiple different TV manufacturers. In this example, we'll say that we have a SHARP-32in, a SHARP-45in, and a SHARP-60in. I want the destinationTB to only have one instance of SHARP (even though there are three in the sourceTB. So, I was trying to compare destinationTB.manufacturer to sourceTB.manufacturer using that JOIN statement. When I run this query that I will paste after this paragraph, it returns all three instances, so I end up with three SHARP values in my destinationTB.

here's my latest one that I tried based off of your suggestions:

INSERT INTO destnationTB (field1)
SELECT sourceTB.field1
FROM sourceTB
LEFT JOIN destinationTB ON sourceTB.field1 = destinationTB.field1
WHERE destinationTB.field1 IS NULL;
share|improve this question
    
I answered a similar question a while ago go read this answer and if you have more questions post a update. See this link stackoverflow.com/questions/13869475/… –  Namphibian Sep 10 '13 at 0:37
    
Oh yes welcome to SO not a a bad attempt at a first question but provide a little more details about where your challenges lies. –  Namphibian Sep 10 '13 at 0:40
1  
Are you using MySQL or SQL Server? The question is tagged as both. –  Aaron Bertrand Sep 10 '13 at 0:54
    
@RobertFizpatrick . . . You really have to do a better job of explaining what you need. What are the columns in the two tables? Why are you joining on the same column you are inserting into the table? And why is it the same field being tested for NULL? –  Gordon Linoff Sep 10 '13 at 0:54

3 Answers 3

It seems you are trying to insert two field1 columns whereas your destination table has only one. It should be:

INSERT into destinationTB 
    SELECT sourceTB.field1 
    FROM sourceTB 
    LEFT JOIN destinationTB ON sourceTB.field1 = destinationTB.field1 
    WHERE destinationTB.field1 IS NULL;

Expand accordingly to every field that should get inserted. If your syntax gets too complicated you can resort to temporary tables too:

    CREATE TEMPORARY TABLE tempTB as 
    SELECT sourceTB.field1 
    FROM sourceTB 
    LEFT JOIN destinationTB ON sourceTB.field1 = destinationTB.field1 
    WHERE destinationTB.field1 IS NULL;

    INSERT into destinationTB 
    SELECT tempTB.field1 
    FROM tempTB ;

temporary tables do vanish after you complete the queries.

share|improve this answer
    
Your first explanation helped me understand it a bit better. When I used the statement, I initially got an error of: 'Column count doesn't match value count at row 1' so I added in the field that I wanted to insert to. INSERT INTO destnationTB (field1) SELECT sourceTB.field1 FROM sourceTB LEFT JOIN destinationTB ON sourceTB.field1 = destinationTB.field1 WHERE destinationTB.field1 IS NULL; –  usafitz Sep 10 '13 at 21:17

I'm going to make a few sweeping generalizations about this question. I'm assuming that field1 is PK on sourceTB and destinationTB and is the only field. If the end goal is to just merge the two tables, this should have zero impact ever, because if destinationTB.field1 IS NULL then destinationTB.field1 will NEVER be equal to anything, including another NULL. You're looking for an OUTER JOIN.

INSERT INTO destinationTB
  SELECT sourceTB.id 
  FROM sourceTB 
    LEFT OUTER JOIN destinationTB 
      ON sourceTB.id = destinationTB.id
  WHERE destinationTB.id IS NULL
share|improve this answer

Well, I came up with a solution to my revised question above. This statement will return only a single instance of a value occurring more than once in the sourceTB.

INSERT INTO destinationTB (field1)
SELECT DISTINCT field2 FROM sourceTB
WHERE EXISTS (SELECT field1 FROM destinationTB)

Thank you for the help, and for the tips when writing questions on here.

Here's my reference for the answer: http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/exists-and-not-exists-subqueries.html

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