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I have this code to make an ajax request, but according to Chrome Inspector the callback associated with the request is being called twice (by this I mean the response is being logged into the console twice), 2 more logs are being printed without any content. Here's the code:

var ajax = {
    pull: function (settings) {
        settings.type = 'get';
        settings.callback = typeof (settings.callback) === 'function' ? settings.callback : false;
        settings.data = settings.data ? settings.data : null;
        return this.request(settings.url, settings.type, settings.callback, settings.data);
    },
    request: function (url, type, callback, data) {
        var ids = ['MSXML2.XMLHTTP.3.0',
            'MSXML2.XMLHTTP',
            'Microsoft.XMLHTTP'],
            xhr;
        if (window.XMLHttpRequest) {
            xhr = new XMLHttpRequest();
        } else {
            for (var i = 0; i < ids.length; i++) {
                try {
                    xhr = new ActiveXObject(ids[i]);
                    break;
                } catch (e) {}
            }
        }
        if (callback) {
            xhr.onreadystatechange = function () {
                callback(xhr);
            };
        }
        xhr.open(type, url, true);
        if (type.toUpperCase() === 'GET') {
            xhr.send();
        } else if (type.toUpperCase() === 'POST') {
            xhr.send(data);
        }
    }
}

ajax.pull({
    url: 'http://localhost/my/twtools/scripts/ajax.php',
    callback: function (xhr) {
        console.log(xhr.response);
    }
});
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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

xhr.onreadystatechange has several steps (numbered from 0 top 4 I do believe something like 0 = uninitialized, 1 = starting etc, although I can't rember the exact names of the steps anymore, a quick google should find them), and each step is calling your callback. If I remember correctly, the last stage is 4, so I do believe you need to check something like this

if (xhr.readyState == 4 && xhr.status == 200)
{
// call has finished successfully
}

inside you callback, i.e. to check that it is all finished and got a successful response

I've been spoilt by jQuery these days (so much easier to do with jQuery), been quite a while since I wrote raw ajax

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I am trying to leave jQuery actually, it made me a lazy person. Thanks for the help. –  yoda Sep 10 '13 at 1:11
    
To be honest, I agree, these days I do my best to use native javascript, tends to be perform better although ajax and animations are the two areas I haven't reverted –  OJay Sep 10 '13 at 1:15
    
I still ride in my car even if it is "lazier" than riding a horse or walking 8 miles. –  Mark Schultheiss Sep 10 '13 at 1:24
    
Comparing cars and horses to JavaScript and jQuery isn't very accurate, but I get what you're trying to say. I don't think you should use jQuery unless you're going to be using it a lot; it's a big library and doesn't need to be used for small things. –  Joe Simmons Sep 10 '13 at 17:00

You're using onreadystatechange, which gets called more than once (once each state change).

Try using

xhr.onload = function() {
    callback(xhr);
};
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