Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Here is an example :

public class B<T> {}
public class D : B<int> {}
public class A<T, S> where T : B<S> {}
public class C : A<D, int> {}

public class Test1
{
    public class test1
    {
        A<D, int> t = new C();
    }
}

What I would like do to is in declaring class C, only say : C : A<D>. Why I need to repeat int ? Because int is already a part of D.

Same in the test1 method. I would like to write : A<D> t = new C();

How, can I achieve that ?

UPDATE

Here with more realistic class names :

public class MyModel<T> { }
public class MyTrueModel : MyModel<int> { }

public class MyManager<T,S> where T : MyModel<S> { }
public class MyTrueManager : MyManager<MyTrueModel, int> { }

public class Test1
{
    public class test1
    {
        MyManager<MyTrueModel, int> t = new MyManager<MyTrueModel, int>();
    }
}

All the problem come from the class MyManager. If I was able to do something like : MyManager<T> where T : MyModel it'd would be great.

share|improve this question
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here's your code:

public class B<T> {}
public class D : B<int> {}
public class A<T, S> where T : B<S> {}
public class C : A<D, int> {}
public class Test1 {
    public class test1 {
        A<D, int> t = new C();
    }
}

Here's equivalent code:

public class B<T> {}
public class D : B<int> {}
public class A<U, V> where U : B<V> {}
public class C : A<D, int> {}
public class Test1 {
    public class test1 {
        A<D, int> t = new C();
    }
}

The point is that the U in A<U, V> is a dummy. When you replace U with T (and V with S) and write A<T, S> the T does not refer to the same T in B<T>. This is why you must use C : A<D, int>. If you were to only write A<D> the compiler does not know (and nor should it; see my comment below on free versus unbound variables) that you want to use int for T in B<T>.

All the problem come from the class MyManager. If I was able to do something like : MyManager<T> where T : MyModel it's would be great.

This is not possible. MyModel is not declared as a type. Only MyModel<T> is a type. More specifically, it is an unbounded generic type. When you specify a type argument (e.g., MyModel<int>) then it will be a constructed type.

At this risk of confusing you further (on this admittedly confusing issue), it might help you read about free and unbounded variables.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your long answer. It's help me to understand. Do you know if there's some workaround I can do to achieve what I want to do ? –  Melursus Dec 9 '09 at 2:05
add comment

Probably I missunderstood your question. But if you do not need int. Just use D.

public class B<T> { }
public class D : B<int> { }
public class A<T> where T : D { }
public class C : A<D> { }
public class Test1 { public class test1 { A<D> t = new C();    } }
share|improve this answer
add comment

A<D> t = new C(); won't work because you have previously declared A to require two generic parameters.

You could declare something like:

class A2<T> : A<T, int> {}

Then (I think) you could achieve A2<D> t = new C();, but I'm assuming that the compiler is smart enough to realize that A2 is compatible with C ... it may not be.

Is this an experiment? Looks like you might have trouble figuring out what this is supposed to do 6 months from now (or even 2 months from now :)

share|improve this answer
    
A2<D> t2 = (A2<D>) ((A<D, int>) new C()); seems to work with A2 defined as above, but it's certainly not better :P –  Seth Dec 9 '09 at 1:15
add comment

Declare A as:

public class A<T> where T : B<S>

Should work, but I don't have a compiler on me so I can't say for sure.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't think this will compile: the compiler has no way to resolve S. –  itowlson Dec 9 '09 at 1:05
    
It can resolve S just as easily as it can resolve T, no? –  Anon. Dec 9 '09 at 1:06
    
@Anon. No. If this were legal then I could say A<int> a = new A<int>(); But now what binds S? –  Jason Dec 9 '09 at 1:38
    
...unless I am grossly mistaken, int does not inherit from B(S). –  Anon. Dec 9 '09 at 1:39
    
But how can the compiler know that? It doesn't even know what S is. Don't use int if that will satisfy you. Here: interface IDoNothing<U> { }, class A<T> where T : IDoNothing<U> { } (what is U?) and class C : IDoNothing<short>, IDoNothing<int>. Finally, A<C> a = new A<C>. Well, C implements both IDoNothing<short> and IDoNothing<int> so which type (short or int) do we use for the unbound type variable U? –  Jason Dec 9 '09 at 1:53
show 2 more comments

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.