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When I compile a cpp file using g++, gcc gives the follow error message:

error: pasting "TBSYS_LOG_LEVEL_" and "-" does not give a valid preprocessing token

Then I check the source code, found out that there was three macro defines:

  • In fileA.h:
#define TBSYS_LOG_LEVEL_ERROR 0
#define TBSYS_LOG(level, _fmt_, args...) ((TBSYS_LOG_LEVEL_##level>TBSYS_LOGGER._level) ? (void)0 : TBSYS_LOG_BASE(level, "[%ld] " _fmt_, pthread_self(), ##args))
  • In fileB.h:
#define ERROR -1

It turns out that "ERROR" was expand to "-1" before macro "TBSYS_LOG" expand.

The result after of expand "TBSYS_LOG_LEVEL_##level" was "TBSYS_LOG_LEVEL_-1", and finally cause the error message.

BUT, as I know, the macro will not expand in this case. (When using ##)

Then I wrote another cpp file to try this out:

#define FOOBAR 100
#define TEST(PARAM) FOO##PARAM
#define BAR -1

int main(){
    cout<<TEST(BAR)<<endl; 
}

This can pass the compile. And the output is 100. These macro defines just like the former one, but not expand "BAR" to "-1", not cause an error message.

Is anyone knows why the macro expand in the former case?


Update: The code using TBSYS_LOG is :

TBSYS_LOG(ERROR, "expand data buffer failed, length: %d", bufsize);

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1  
Your real code likely has an extra level of indirection through macros. It is at this extra level that ERROR got expanded. For example, if you do #define TEST2(PARAM) TEST(PARAM) and use TEST2(BAR), you'll see this in action. Show how you use TBSYS_LOG macro. –  Igor Tandetnik Sep 10 '13 at 3:55

2 Answers 2

#define FOOBAR 100
#define TEST(PARAM) FOO##PARAM
#define BAR -1

int main(){
    cout<<TEST(BAR)<<endl; 
}

##PARAM denote the symbol itself. So TEST(BAR) here expand to be FOO##BAR(not the result, just for explanation), which is FOOBAR, which by #define FOOBAR 100, is 100.

BAR is never appeared as an independence symbol(separated by space or other delimiter), so no replacement as -1.

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FOO##PARAM will be expand at compile time, so before you run the code, the value to the macro has been fixed, it's FOOBAR, if you add a new param like this:

#define FOOBAR 100
#define TEST(PARAM) FOO##PARAM
#define BAR -1
#define GOOD 10

int main(){
    cout<<TEST(GOOD)<<endl; 
}

the compiler may never make it work for you.

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This is because that "FOOGOOD" doesn't exist. TEST(GOOD) expand to "FOOGOOD", this is ok. The case in the question is like TEST(GOOD) expand to "FOO10". –  user1260771 Sep 10 '13 at 8:51

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