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I have a string such as 'xxox-x' that I want to mask each line in a file against as such:

  • x's are ignored (or just set to a known value)
  • o's remain unchanged
  • the - is a variable length field that will keep everything else unchanged

therefore mask 'xxox-x' against 'deadbeef' would yield 'xxaxbeex'

the same mask 'xxox-x' against 'deadabbabeef' would yield 'xxaxabbabeex'

How can I do this succinctly preferrably using s operator?

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What happens if you have a pattern like xxo-xx-x? –  daotoad Dec 9 '09 at 1:43
1  
assume the mask only ever has 1 variable length field .. otherwise you would have ambiguity. –  Reed Debaets Dec 9 '09 at 1:46
    
Well you could first modulo the number of "-"s by the number of remaining characters, and follow that with regular division. That would get rid of the ambiguity. –  Austin Kelley Way Dec 9 '09 at 3:06
    
what happens if the file line is too short? e.g. "xxo-xox" against "abcde" –  ysth Dec 9 '09 at 6:25

7 Answers 7

up vote 7 down vote accepted
$mask =~ s/-/'o' x (length $str - length $mask)/e;
$str =~ s/(.)/substr($mask, pos $str, 1) eq 'o' ? $1 : 'x'/eg;
share|improve this answer
    
Excellent. This resolves the issues with keeping track of back references as you build your substitution string from the mask. –  daotoad Dec 9 '09 at 2:17
    
excellent idea with replacing - with the appropriate number of o's –  Reed Debaets Dec 9 '09 at 2:19
    
as a side note ... I think you need to initialize $pos to 0 and change substr($mask,pos,1) to substr($mask,$pos++,1) –  Reed Debaets Dec 9 '09 at 2:29
    
Nope, pos is a Perl function describing where in the string the last regex match was. Of course, I kinda screwed up and should have written pos($str), but it would have worked as written if it were $_ :) –  ephemient Dec 9 '09 at 2:50
1  
@ephemient, very nice, elegant and simple! –  zen Dec 9 '09 at 5:04
$ perl -pe 's/^..(.).(.+).$/xx$1x$2x/;'
deadbeef
xxaxbeex
deadabbabeef
xxaxabbabeex
share|improve this answer
    
thats close ... however, assume both the mask and the string are both variable ... perhaps a slightly different mask syntax could be used to provide something functionally similar to this –  Reed Debaets Dec 9 '09 at 1:52

Compile your pattern into a Perl sub:

sub compile {
  use feature 'switch';
  my($pattern) = @_;
  die "illegal pattern" unless $pattern =~ /^[-xo]+$/;

  my($search,$replace);
  my $i = 0;
  for (split //, $pattern) {
    given ($_) {
      when ("x") {
        $search  .= "."; $replace .= "x";
      }
      when ("o") {
        $search  .= "(?<sub$i>.)";
        $replace .= "\$+{sub$i}";
        ++$i;
      }
      when ("-") {
        $search  .= "(?<sub$i>.*)";
        $replace .= "\$+{sub$i}";
        ++$i;
      }
    }
  }

  my $code = q{
    sub {
      local($_) = @_;
      s/^SEARCH$/REPLACE/s;
      $_;
    }
  };
  $code =~ s/SEARCH/$search/;
  $code =~ s/REPLACE/$replace/;

  #print $code;
  local $@;
  my $sub = eval $code;
  die $@ if $@;

  $sub;
}

To be more concise, you could write

sub _patref { '$+{sub' . $_[0]++ . '}' }

sub compile {
  my($pattern) = @_;
  die "illegal pattern" unless $pattern =~ /^[-xo]+$/;

  my %gen = (
    'x' => sub { $_[1] .= '.';               $_[2] .= 'x' },
    'o' => sub { $_[1] .= "(?<sub$_[0]>.)";  $_[2] .= &_patref },
    '-' => sub { $_[1] .= "(?<sub$_[0]>.*)"; $_[2] .= &_patref },
  );

  my($i,$search,$replace) = (0,"","");
  $gen{$1}->($i,$search,$replace)
    while $pattern =~ /(.)/g;

  eval "sub { local(\$_) = \@_; s/\\A$search\\z/$replace/; \$_ }"
    or die $@;
}

Testing it:

use v5.10;

my $replace = compile "xxox-x";

my @tests = (
  [ deadbeef     => "xxaxbeex" ],
  [ deadabbabeef => "xxaxabbabeex" ],
);

for (@tests) {
  my($input,$expect) = @$_;
  my $got = $replace->($input);
  print "$input => $got : ", ($got eq $expect ? "PASS" : "FAIL"), "\n";
}

Output:

deadbeef => xxaxbeex : PASS
deadabbabeef => xxaxabbabeex : PASS

Note that you'll need Perl 5.10.x for given ... when.

share|improve this answer
    
this is the route I was just heading down ... thanks! –  Reed Debaets Dec 9 '09 at 2:14
    
Disregard that other comment. I fail at life. I think a more elegant solution can be found, but that wasn't it. –  Chris Lutz Dec 9 '09 at 2:37
2  
Though I will note that for(@a) { given($_) { } } is redundant. Perlsyn (perldoc.perl.org/perlsyn.html#Switch-statements) specifically says that for(@a) { when "x" { ... } } is allowed. –  Chris Lutz Dec 9 '09 at 2:42

x can be translated to . and o to (.) whereas - becomes (.+?):

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict; use warnings;

my %s = qw( deadbeef xxaxbeex deadabbabeef xxaxabbabeex);

for my $k ( keys %s ) {
    (my $x = $k) =~ s/^..(.).(.+?).\z/xx$1x$2x/;
    print +($x eq $s{$k} ? 'good' : 'bad'), "\n";
}
share|improve this answer
    
Can you extend your code to handle arbitrary masks with an arbitrary number of os? –  daotoad Dec 9 '09 at 2:19

heres a quick stab at a regex generator.. maybe somebody can refactor something pretty from it?

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use Test::Most qw( no_plan );

my $mask = 'xxox-x';

is( mask( $mask, 'deadbeef' ),     'xxaxbeex' );
is( mask( $mask, 'deadabbabeef' ), 'xxaxabbabeex' );

sub mask {
    my ($mask, $string) = @_;
    my $regex = $mask;
    my $capture_index = 1;

    my $mask_rules = {
    	'x' => '.',
    	'o' => '(.)',
    	'-' => '(.+)',
    };

    $regex =~ s/$_/$mask_rules->{$_}/g for keys %$mask_rules;
    $mask  =~ s/$_/$mask_rules->{$_}/g for keys %$mask_rules;

    $mask  =~ s/\./x/g;
    $mask  =~ s/\([^)]+\)/'$' . $capture_index++/eg;

    eval  " \$string =~ s/^$regex\$/$mask/ ";

    $string;

}
share|improve this answer

Here's a character by character solution using substr rather that split. It should be efficient for long strings since it skips processing the middle part of the string (when there is a dash).

sub apply_mask {
    my $mask = shift;
    my $string = shift;

    my ($head, $tail) = split /-/, $mask;

    for( 0 .. length($head) - 1 ) {
        my $m = substr $head, $_, 1;

        next if $m eq 'o';
        die "Bad char $m\n" if $m ne 'x';

        substr($string, $_, 1) = 'x';
    }

    return $string unless defined $tail;

    $tail = reverse $tail;
    my $last_char = length($string) - 1;

    for( 0 .. length($tail) - 1 ) {
        my $m = substr $tail, $_, 1;

        next if $m eq 'o';
        die "Bad char $m\n" if $m ne 'x';


        substr($string, $last_char - $_, 1) = 'x';

    }

    return $string;
}
share|improve this answer
sub mask {
    local $_ = $_[0];
    my $mask = $_[1];
    $mask =~ s/-/'o' x (length($_)-(length($mask)-1))/e;
    s/(.)/substr($mask, pos, 1) eq 'o' && $1/eg;
    return $_;
}

Used tidbits from a couple answers ... this is what I ended up with.

EDIT: update from comments

share|improve this answer
1  
Please use local $_ = $_[0] -- see the start of perldoc perlvar (perldoc.perl.org/perlvar.html) for rationale. Also, if your replacement is going to be an empty string and not 'x', you can shorten the latter to substr($mask, pos, 1) eq 'o' && $1 because Perl booleans return empty strings on failure. –  ephemient Dec 9 '09 at 3:36

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