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I am facing this weird requirement where I am supposed to create a web page using GWT widgets in an existing spring-maven web project but the corp security doesn't allow me to install any Eclipse plugins. I have the latest SDK but thats about it.

Is there any way to achieve this?

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I guess you'll have to search through the plugin source and rewrite it on your own for the sake of security. –  otonglet Sep 10 '13 at 6:48
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Which plugin are you talking about? The gwt-maven-plugin or the Google Plugin for Eclipse? –  Thomas Broyer Sep 10 '13 at 7:47
    
@ThomasBroyer the eclipse plugin. this is an internal dashboard application so security is not of great concern. It wont be accessible outside the LAN –  user2763598 Sep 11 '13 at 16:46

1 Answer 1

The Google Plugin for Eclipse (GPE), just like so many other Eclipse plugins, is not mandatory; it's just an aid.

But first, if “the corp security doesn't allow me to install any plugin” only means you're not allowed to use the Eclipse marketplace or contact update sites, it's worth mentionning that you can download the update site as a ZIP to be used locally: https://developers.google.com/eclipse/docs/install-from-zip

If that isn't allowed either, then let's look at the features provided by the GPE and how you can possibly do the same without the plugin:

  • Wizard for creating new projects: you're in a Maven project, so you're not concerned.

  • Running and debugging: you can do the same with a Java Application launcher. Choose com.google.gwt.dev.DevMode as the Main Class, add the com.google.gwt:gwt-dev JAR to the classpath (you can also add it as a dependency with scope provided, and ignore the warning printed by the gwt-maven-plugin) if needed, add your source folders to the classpath and pass the appropriate arguments.

  • Wizards: let's be honest, they won't boost your productivity that much.

  • GWT Compilation: you can do the same with a Java Application launcher. Choose the com.google.gwt.dev.Compiler as the Main Class, add gwt-dev and your source folders to the classpath and pass the appropriate arguments.

  • Editors: you'll lose the formatting and highlighting of JSNI methods, as well as reference checking of your JSNI references, the auto-complete in UiBinder, and validation of UiBinder and ClientBundle references. All those will be done only when you GWT-compile your project.

  • RPC: you'll lose the validation of your RPC interfaces and quick-fix to keep your sync and async interfaces in sync. Validation will be done only when you GWT-compile your project.

  • JUnit: you can do the same with a JUnit launcher: just make sure you add gwt-dev and your source folders to the classpath, and pass the appropriate options as a gwt.args system property (see “Passing Arguments to the Test Infrastructure” in the docs).

Nothing insurmountable.

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Thats great to know. So now I have an empty maven project and downloaded the gwt sdk. What sort of XMLs and config files would I need to make this work? I am thinking if I can make a sample HelloWorld kind of app with GWT, I can figure out how to integrate it with our legacy Spring-Maven app. –  user2763598 Sep 12 '13 at 17:16
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There are Maven archetypes to get you started, e.g. (shameless plug) github.com/tbroyer/gwt-maven-archetypes BTW, “downloaded the gwt sdk”!? You're using Maven so you just have to declare the appropriate plugins and dependencies! –  Thomas Broyer Sep 13 '13 at 8:14

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