Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am looking for a JSON Parser that can allow me to iterate through JSON objects from a large JSON file (with size few hundreds of MBs). I tried JsonTextReader from Json.NET like below:

JsonTextReader reader = new JsonTextReader(new StringReader(json));
while (reader.Read())
{
    if (reader.Value != null)
       Console.WriteLine("Token: {0}, Value: {1}", reader.TokenType, reader.Value);
    else
       Console.WriteLine("Token: {0}", reader.TokenType);
}

But it returns token after token.
Is there any simpler way if I need whole object instead of tokens?

share|improve this question
    
JObject.Parse –  I4V Sep 10 '13 at 9:21
1  
Have to tried to take a look at Newtonsoft JSON(json.codeplex.com) –  Zaksh Sep 10 '13 at 9:23
    
@Zaksh I am trying same Json.NET library –  Seenu Sep 10 '13 at 9:59
    
@I4V It works well only on short JSON strings, there could be memory issues for Json text read from files of larger size –  Seenu Sep 10 '13 at 10:00
    
@I4V I have array of objects, I need to read object after object instead of reading property after property. –  Seenu Sep 10 '13 at 10:39

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Let's assume you have a json array similar to this:

[{"text":"0"},{"text":"1"}......]

I'll declare a class for the object type

public class TempClass
{
    public string text;
}

Now, the deserializetion part

JsonSerializer ser = new JsonSerializer();
ser.Converters.Add(new DummyConverter<TempClass>(t =>
    {
       //A callback method
        Console.WriteLine(t.text);
    }));

ser.Deserialize(new JsonTextReader(new StreamReader(File.OpenRead(fName))), 
                typeof(List<TempClass>));

And a dummy JsonConverter class to intercept the deserialization

public class DummyConverter<T> : JsonConverter
{
    Action<T> _action = null;
    public DummyConverter(Action<T> action)
    {
        _action = action;
    }
    public override bool CanConvert(Type objectType)
    {
        return objectType == typeof(TempClass);
    }

    public override object ReadJson(JsonReader reader, Type objectType, object existingValue, JsonSerializer serializer)
    {
        serializer.Converters.Remove(this);
        T item = serializer.Deserialize<T>(reader);
        _action( item);
        return null;
    }

    public override void WriteJson(JsonWriter writer, object value, JsonSerializer serializer)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
what is the importance of serializer.Converters.Remove(this); –  Seenu Sep 11 '13 at 16:53
1  
@Seenu if you don't remove it, below line (T item = serializer.Deserialize<T>(reader);) results in infinite recursion. –  I4V Sep 11 '13 at 17:01

I would use this library JSON.net. The command for Nuget is as follows -> Install-Package Newtonsoft.Json

share|improve this answer
    
I am using same –  Seenu Sep 10 '13 at 10:02

This is one of the use cases I contemplated for my own parser/deserializer.

I've recently made a simple example (by feeding the parser with JSON text that is read thru a StreamReader) of deserializing this JSON shape:

{ 
"fathers" : [ 
{ 
  "id" : 0,
  "married" : true,
  "name" : "John Lee",
  "sons" : [ 
    { 
      "age" : 15,
      "name" : "Ronald"
      }
    ],
  "daughters" : [ 
    { 
      "age" : 7,
      "name" : "Amy"
      },
    { 
      "age" : 29,
      "name" : "Carol"
      },
    { 
      "age" : 14,
      "name" : "Barbara"
      }
    ]
  },
{ 
  "id" : 1,
  "married" : false,
  "name" : "Kenneth Gonzalez",
  "sons" : [
    ],
  "daughters" : [
    ]
  },
{ 
  "id" : 2,
  "married" : false,
  "name" : "Larry Lee",
  "sons" : [ 
    { 
      "age" : 4,
      "name" : "Anthony"
      },
    { 
      "age" : 2,
      "name" : "Donald"
      }
    ],
  "daughters" : [ 
    { 
      "age" : 7,
      "name" : "Elizabeth"
      },
    { 
      "age" : 15,
      "name" : "Betty"
      }
    ]
  },

  //(... etc)
  ]
}

... into these POCOs:

https://github.com/ysharplanguage/FastJsonParser#POCOs

(i.e., specifically: "FathersData", "Father", "Son", "Daughter")

That sample also presents:

(1) a sample filter on the relative item index in the Father[] array (e.g., to fetch only the first 10), and

(2) how to populate dynamically a property of the father's daughters, as the deserialization of their respective father returns - (that is, thanks to a delegate that the caller passes on to the parser's Parse method, for callback purposes).

For the rest of the bits, see:

ParserTests.cs : static void FilteredFatherStreamTestDaughterMaidenNamesFixup()

(lines #829 to #904)

The performance I observe on my humble laptop (*) for parsing some ~ 12MB to ~ 180MB JSON files and deserializing an arbitrary subset of their content into POCOs

(or into loosely-typed dictionaries (just (string, object) key/value pairs) also supported)

is anywhere in the ballpark from ~ 20MB/sec to 40MB/sec (**).

(e.g., ~ 300 milliseconds in the case of the 12MB JSON file, into POCOs)

More detailed info available here:

https://github.com/ysharplanguage/FastJsonParser#Performance

'HTH,

(*) (running Win7 64bit @ 2.5Ghz)

(**) (the throughput is quite dependent on the input JSON shape/complexity, e.g., sub-objects nesting depth, and other factors)

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.