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If I have a query like this

SELECT * FROM table1 WHERE col1 IN ({SUBS})

Is there anything I can replace {SUBS} with that will return all rows in the table?

Further details:

I am building the SQL dynamically in my app, so I cannot (should not) edit other parts of the query except what's in braces. So,

SELECT * FROM table1

will not do.

Also,

SELECT * FROM table1 WHERE col1 IN (SELECT col1 FROM table1)

would be hackish and highly inefficient. Consider the table have more than 50k rows.

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1  
I know this isn't the question, but I have to ask: are you just trying to get all of the rows? If so, just take off the "WHERE col1 IN ({SUBS})" part. –  Donnie DeBoer Dec 9 '09 at 4:45
1  
someone told me once - there's no such thing as a stupid question... –  pstanton Dec 9 '09 at 4:46
1  
sounds like someone is building dynamic sql to me... –  marcc Dec 9 '09 at 4:56
    
"...would be highly inefficient. Consider the table have more than 50k rows." You said you wanted to retrieve all 50k rows. I think efficiency's kind of a moot point. –  Dewayne Christensen Dec 9 '09 at 16:34
    
The question is, what is the identity with respect to semijoin in SQL? A good question which you answer yourself with your last query! –  onedaywhen Mar 26 '12 at 8:42

7 Answers 7

This would do it:

select col1 from table1

Edit: There seems to be a bit of confusion - the OP asked what value could be used to replace {SUBS} that would return all rows from table1. My answer above is what you could use in place of {SUBS} that would return all the rows.

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1  
you mean select * from table1 –  pstanton Dec 9 '09 at 4:46
3  
Nope, I meant select col1 from table1 :) –  Andrew Hare Dec 9 '09 at 4:48
2  
I think viligant is trying to find out if someone could use SQL injection to find all the data in the table, which Andrew's reply would allow, although I might use SELECT distinct col1 FROM table1 But his answer is proper –  Sparky Dec 9 '09 at 4:56
    
@Sparky - right on, that is what I was thinking as well. –  Andrew Hare Dec 9 '09 at 4:58
1  
distinct? ? ? ? –  ysth Dec 9 '09 at 5:02

This works for me in SQL Server:

SELECT * FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.COLUMNS
WHERE COLUMN_NAME IN (COLUMN_NAME)

Have you tried just using COL1 for {SUBS}?

e.g.

SELECT * FROM table1 WHERE col1 IN (col1)
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Beautiful answer. –  tyriker Mar 3 '11 at 16:09

If you replaced {SUBS} with SELECT col1 FROM table1, you would end up with

SELECT * FROM table1 WHERE col1 IN (SELECT col1 FROM table1);

which would return all rows from table1. This is, of course, simply a more roundabout way of saying:

SELECT * FROM table1;
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You're right,

SELECT * FROM table1 WHERE col1 IN (SELECT col1 FROM table1)

does work, but is highly inefficient; requiring a merge join to return all rows.

Use the following which is just as efficient as regular SELECT * FROM table1

SELECT * FROM table1 WHERE col1 IN (col1)

However, that said; I suggest you have a chat to the person who is trying to impose the SELECT * FROM table1 WHERE col1 IN ({SUBS}) structure. There is no good reason to do so.

  • It unnecessarily complicates queries.
  • Creates risk of highly inefficient queries.
  • Potentially even limits developers to use certain techniques.

I suspect the person imposing this is trying to implement some sort of silver-bullet framework. Remember, the golden rule in software development is that there are no silver-bullets.

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If you're simply trying to retrieve every row in the table, then:

select * from table1

If you're trying to prove a point or win a bet or something, then:

select * from table1 where col1 in (select col1 from table1)
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If the query requires some WHERE condition, then I would try to replace it with an EXISTS statement:

select
  *
from
  table1 t1
where
  exists ( {subs} )

Then {subs} can be replaced with any expression that does not yield NULL.

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This works in Oracle:

select * from table1 where col1 in (col1)
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