Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I get the dates in format %dd.%mm.%YYYY and I'm trying to substract one month, using Perl.

examples: 12.07.2013 -> 12.06.2013 , 30.09.2013 -> 31.08.2013

Should I use Date::Calc? Any ideas?

Thanks

share|improve this question
7  
Subtracting one month from 30th September and ending up with 31st August would be unusual for a generic "take one month off" (although the reverse scenario taking one month from 31st July and ending up at 30th June, would be considered normal). Are you sure that's what is needed? Please supply a couple more examples, and any Perl code you have tried so far. –  Neil Slater Sep 10 '13 at 11:46

2 Answers 2

You can use Time::Piece, which is a core module since Perl v5.9.5.

use strict;
use warnings;
use Time::Piece;
use Time::Seconds;

my $t = Time::Piece->strptime(shift, "%d.%m.%Y");
$t -= ONE_MONTH;
print $t->strftime("%d.%m.%Y");

Given the arguments 12.07.2013 and 30.09.2013 this code prints 11.06.2013 and 30.08.2013, respectively.

The strptime function parses the string according to the template into a Time::Piece object. Then we can simply add/subtract to the object to manipulate the date. Here I am using a constant from the Time::Seconds module, corresponding to one month.

This is all taken from the documentation for Time::Piece.

share|improve this answer
1  
12.07.2013 minus ONE_MONTH equals 11.06.2013 by this method. Obviously a lot hangs on the OP's definition of one month, but I would expect from the examples so far, we are talking about calendar month calculations, and not a fixed number of days (or seconds). –  Neil Slater Sep 10 '13 at 12:13
    
Time::Piece has the add_months method, which would yield 12.06.2013 here (when used with -1 as argument). However, it's still interesting what the OP expects if "impossible" dates would be the result of the operation, e.g. 30.02.2013. –  Slaven Rezic Sep 10 '13 at 12:16
    
@SlavenRezic add_months does not seem to do anything, it just produces the same date. Perhaps it is a slightly irregular function in the module. –  TLP Sep 10 '13 at 12:29
    
The result of perl -MTime::Piece -e 'warn Time::Piece->new->add_months(-1)' is Sat Aug 10 14:44:56 2013 at -e line 1.. Today's 2013-09-10, so looks OK here; same result with perl 5.10.1 and 5.18.1, probably the default Time::Piece installed here. –  Slaven Rezic Sep 10 '13 at 12:47
1  
@SlavenRezic Aha, I see. For some weird reason, it only returns the manipulated object, it does not affect the original object. So I would have to do my $t2 = $t->add_months(-1). Well, that's original at least. Try perl -MTime::Piece -lwe'$t = localtime; $t->add_months(-1); print $t;' –  TLP Sep 10 '13 at 13:23

DateTime supports the snap to end-of-month behavior you are looking for. The end_of_month option is documented in the section Adding a Duration to a Datetime. I have also provided solution for Date::Calc which shows the logic. Output is the same for both solutions.

DateTime:

use DateTime;

my @dates = qw(
    01.01.2013
    28.02.2013
    12.07.2013
    30.09.2013
);

foreach my $string (@dates) {
    my %p; @p{qw(day month year)} = split /\./, $string;
    my $dt = DateTime->new(%p);
    for my $n (-1, 1) {
        my $res = $dt->clone->add(months => $n, end_of_month => 'preserve');
        printf "%s %+d month => %s\n", $string, $n, $res->strftime('%d.%m.%Y');
    }
}

Date::Calc:

use Date::Calc qw[Days_in_Month Decode_Date_EU];

my @dates = qw(
    01.01.2013
    28.02.2013
    12.07.2013
    30.09.2013
);

sub Add_Months {
    @_ == 4 || die q/Usage: Add_Months($year, $month, $day, $delta)/;
    my ($y, $m, $d, $delta) = @_;

    my $ultimo = ($d == Days_in_Month($y, $m));

    use integer;
    $m += $delta;
    $y += $m / 12;
    $m %= 12;
    if ($m < 1) {
        $y--, $m += 12;
    }
    my $dim = Days_in_Month($y, $m);
    if ($d > $dim || $ultimo) {
        $d = $dim;
    }
    return ($y, $m, $d);
}

foreach my $string (@dates) {
    for my $n (-1, 1) {
        printf "%s %+d month => %.2d.%.2d.%.4d\n",
            $string, $n, reverse(Add_Months(Decode_Date_EU($string), $n));
    }
}

Output:

01.01.2013 -1 month => 01.12.2012
01.01.2013 +1 month => 01.02.2013
28.02.2013 -1 month => 31.01.2013
28.02.2013 +1 month => 31.03.2013
12.07.2013 -1 month => 12.06.2013
12.07.2013 +1 month => 12.08.2013
30.09.2013 -1 month => 31.08.2013
30.09.2013 +1 month => 31.10.2013
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.