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I apologize if this is a duplicate, but I have not been able to find a question with a similar situation. If this is a duplicate please provide a link.

I would like to show a "Loading..." overlay in my WPF application, when I am dynamically creating a lot of tabs. The overlay visibility is bound to a property called "ShowIsLoadingOverlay". However, the overlay is never shown.

Due to the fact that the tabs are visual elements I can't move the creation into a BackgroundWorker.

I have created a small prototype trying to explain the situation. This is the xaml:

<Window x:Class="WpfApplication5.MainWindow"
    xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
    Title="MainWindow" Height="350" Width="525">
    <Window.Resources>
        <BooleanToVisibilityConverter x:Key="BooleanToVisibilityConverter"/>
    </Window.Resources>

    <Grid>
        <Grid.RowDefinitions>
            <RowDefinition />
            <RowDefinition Height="Auto" />
        </Grid.RowDefinitions>

        <Label HorizontalAlignment="Center" VerticalAlignment="Center" 
               Visibility="{Binding ShowIsLoadingOverlay, Converter={StaticResource BooleanToVisibilityConverter}}" 
               Content="Loading..." />

        <Button Grid.Row="1" Content="Load" Click="Button_Click" />
    </Grid>
</Window>

And this is the code behind:

public partial class MainWindow : Window, INotifyPropertyChanged
{
   private bool m_ShowIsLoadingOverlay;
   public bool ShowIsLoadingOverlay
   {
      get
      {
         return m_ShowIsLoadingOverlay;
      }
      set
      {
         if ( m_ShowIsLoadingOverlay == value )
         {
            return;
         }

         m_ShowIsLoadingOverlay = value;
         NotifyPropertyChanged( "ShowIsLoadingOverlay" );
      }
   }

   public MainWindow()
   {
      InitializeComponent();

      DataContext = this;
   }

   private void Button_Click( object sender, RoutedEventArgs e )
   {
      ShowIsLoadingOverlay = true;

      CreateTabs();

      ShowIsLoadingOverlay = false;
   }

   private void CreateTabs()
   {
      // Simulate long running process to create tabs
      Thread.Sleep( 3000 );
   }

   // Implementation of INotifyPropertyChanged has been left out.
}

The problem is that the overlay is never shown. I know that it has something to do with the UI not updated correctly before and after the ShowIsLoadingOverlay property has changed. And I believe it also has something to do with the lack of using the dispatcher.

I have tried many, many combinations of Dispatcher.Invoke, Dispatcher.BeginInvoke surrounding when changing the property and/or surrounding the CreateTabs call. And I have tried changing the DispatcherPriority to "force" the overlay to show before starting to create the tabs. But I just can't make it work...

Could you please tell me how to accomplish this task? And more importantly; provide an explanation, because I do not get this.

In advance, thank you.

Best regards, Casper Korshøj

share|improve this question
    
    
What does CreateTabs do? you should not create or manipulate UI elements in code in WPF. Also, that code probably does not belong into code behind. –  HighCore Sep 10 '13 at 15:27
    
@I4V: But is it even posible to create UI elements (that belong on the UI thread) using async and await? –  Casper Taylor Korshøj Sep 11 '13 at 6:12
    
@HighCore: CreateTabs is a method that generates some tabs dynamically based on some user roles. What is the problem about creating and manipulating UI elements in code in WPF? –  Casper Taylor Korshøj Sep 11 '13 at 6:12

1 Answer 1

You cannot manipulate UI controls in a background thread. If you are using the main UI thread to create your TabItems, then you also cannot have a 'Busy' or 'Loading' indicator... this will only work if you are using a alternative thread for your long running process. This is because your 'Busy' indicator will only become updated once the long running process has completed if it runs on the same UI thread.

share|improve this answer
    
But isn't there any way to "release" the main UI thread before going into the long running process? Or maybe postpone the CreateTabs call by using some kind of a callback after the loading indicator has shown? –  Casper Taylor Korshøj Sep 11 '13 at 6:16

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