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Lately I've stumbled upon an error in a lib that used to work just fine, and I'll be damned if I can figure out where it is.

The code sample is below, and I apologize for the debug stuff that's inside it, but I'm trying to get it to work.

The problem is that $temp is an array with correct key (the name of the columns) but all the values are NULL.

I think the problem lies in the

call_user_func_array(array($query, 'bind_result'), $params);

bit, but can't really wrap my head around it.

public function fetchRows(){
	error_reporting(E_ALL+E_NOTICE);
	$args = func_get_args();
	$sql = array_shift($args);
	traceVar($sql, "Query");
	$colTypes = array_shift($args);
	if (!$query = $this->prepare($sql, $colTypes)) {
		die('Please check your sql statement : unable to prepare');
	}
	if (count($args)){
		traceVar($args,'Binding params with');
		call_user_func_array(array($query,'bindParam'), $args);
	}

	$query->execute();

	$meta = $query->result_metadata();
	while ($field = $meta->fetch_field()) {
		$params[] = &$row[$field->name];
	}
	traceVar($params,'Binding results with');
	call_user_func_array(array($query, 'bind_result'), $params);

	while ($query->fetch()) {
		traceVar($row,'After fetch');
		$temp = array();
		foreach($row as $key => $val) {
			$temp[$key] = $val;
		} 
		$result[] = $temp;
	}

	$meta->free();
	$query->close(); 
	//self::close_db_conn(); 
	return $result;
}
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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The code you provided works for me.

The call_user_func_array(...) function just calls the bindParam or bind_result methods on the $query object with the given array, as if you had provided each element of the array as a method argument.

You may want to check the SQL statement you are having the problem with, with the code below. I've rewritten it a bit in order to make it fully testable, since the original code depends on the statement class in your abstraction layer.

<?php

$db_host = 'localhost';
$db_user = 'username';
$db_pass = 'password';
$db_name = 'database';

$mysqli = new mysqli($db_host, $db_user, $db_pass, $db_name);

print_r(fetchRows('SELECT something from some_table WHERE some_id = ?', 'i', 1));

function traceVar($a, $b) {
    print_r(array($b => $a));
}

function fetchRows(){
        error_reporting(E_ALL+E_NOTICE);
        $args = func_get_args();
        $sql = array_shift($args);
        traceVar($sql, "Query");

        // Keep the column types for bind_param.
        // $colTypes = array_shift($args);

        // Column types were originally passed here as a second
        // argument, and stored in the statement object, I suppose.
        if (!$query = $GLOBALS['mysqli']->prepare($sql)){ //, $colTypes)) {
                die('Please check your sql statement : unable to prepare');
        }
        if (count($args)){
                traceVar($args,'Binding params with');

                // Just a quick hack to pass references in order to
                // avoid errors.
                foreach ($args as &$v) {
                    $v = &$v;
                }

                // Replace the bindParam function of the original
                // abstraction layer.
                call_user_func_array(array($query,'bind_param'), $args); //'bindParam'), $args);
        }

        $query->execute();

        $meta = $query->result_metadata();
        while ($field = $meta->fetch_field()) {
                $params[] = &$row[$field->name];
        }
        traceVar($params,'Binding results with');
        call_user_func_array(array($query, 'bind_result'), $params);

        while ($query->fetch()) {
                traceVar($row,'After fetch');
                $temp = array();
                foreach($row as $key => $val) {
                        $temp[$key] = $val;
                } 
                $result[] = $temp;
        }

        $meta->free();
        $query->close(); 
        //self::close_db_conn(); 
        return $result;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I tried with paste2.org/p/554177 and it works like a charm, I wonder where my original code is breaking. –  Madness Dec 9 '09 at 12:44
    
I must be making some mistake when implementing your changes, if I rewrite the function as paste2.org/p/554194 and then I run paste2.org/p/554192 I still get "Array ( [0] => Array ( [ID] => [Username] => [Password] => [Name] => [Email] => [AccessLevel] => [IsTemp] => ) )" –  Madness Dec 9 '09 at 13:00
    
If it is of any use, I also placed some other bits from the class here paste2.org/p/554201 –  Madness Dec 9 '09 at 13:07
    
It would appear that the problem is with the other methods I posted in my last comment. I placed a $db = $this->connection; before if (!$query = $db->prepare($sql)) { (thus using the original object and not the wrapper class) and it works. Any clue of what I might be doing wrong? –  Madness Dec 9 '09 at 13:12
    
Looking at the other code you provided, I notice that DBStatement::prepare(...) is empty, which would explain why $db = $this->connection; is required to make it work :-). Can you check whether the DBStatement::prepare(...) method in your original code is empty too? –  Inshallah Dec 9 '09 at 16:27

If we could choose the server at start, we could use php-mysqlnd module instead of php-mysql module for PHP. (Or some of you maybe already using it, run "phpinfo();" and search for "mysqlnd") :

public function fetchRows(){
    ...
    $query->execute();

    $res = $query->get_result();
    while (($row = $res->fetch_assoc()))
        $result[] = $row;
    return $result;
    }
}

That seems simpler to me.

share|improve this answer
    
May I ask, how many questions you are going to answer with this new knowledge? A rough estimation would be okay –  Your Common Sense Apr 4 at 10:43
1  
Two. Just because in past, I searched a few of these solutions, and didn't notice that there is a get_result() which may also work. So adding it for future users' reference. –  Johnny Wong Apr 4 at 10:46
    
Two is a fair amount. Just though you were going to answer all the thousands questions ever asked on the matter –  Your Common Sense Apr 4 at 10:46

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