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Is there anyway to make ArrayCollection is readyonly.. So the client can only read the data..but additem or remove item

Example will be very helpfull

thanks in advance

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Wrap it in your custom class and make the wrapped ArrayCollection const/final, I couldn't remember. Provide only get method. Init ArrayCollection in constructor and make it private. –  GokcenG Sep 10 '13 at 14:56
2  
@GokcenG final makes an object non-overridable. const is a variable that cannot be changed after instantiation (so you couldn't call new a second time). Neither of them will help the asker in this case. –  Josh Janusch Sep 10 '13 at 21:22
    
@JoshJanusch Are you sure final makes an "object" non-overridable or it makes class and method non-overridable? It's long time I haven't written AS code so I've talked in terms of Java's final keyword. I think it may help him making internal ArrayCollection const but you are right, it is not vital for solution. –  GokcenG Sep 11 '13 at 7:38
1  
@GokcenG Yes, that is exactly what final does. See this doc. And using const would only prevent the variable from being re-instantiated. It would have absolutely no effect on preventing someone from using methods or properties of the object as the asker needs. –  Josh Janusch Sep 11 '13 at 14:19
    
@JoshJanusch I doubt your first statement is correct. He and I were talking about ArrayCollection object not a method. As I tried on FB, it doesn't even let me to put final in front of an object. –  GokcenG Sep 11 '13 at 22:07

2 Answers 2

This class will allow you to create an ArrayCollection with a source array using the new constructor, but you won't be able to add or remove items using the interface methods.

package
{
import mx.collections.ArrayCollection;
import mx.collections.IList;

public class ArrayCollectionReadOnly extends ArrayCollection
{
    public function ArrayCollectionReadOnly(source:Array=null)
    {
        super(source);
    }

    override public function addAll(addList:IList):void {
        throw new Error("Illegal Operation, read only");    
    }

    override public function addAllAt(addList:IList, index:int):void {
        throw new Error("Illegal Operation, read only");    
    }

    override public function addItem(item:Object):void{
        throw new Error("Illegal Operation, read only");    
    }

    override public function addItemAt(item:Object, index:int):void{
        throw new Error("Illegal Operation, read only");    
    }

    override public function removeAll():void {
        throw new Error("Illegal Operation, read only");    
    }

    override public function removeItemAt(index:int):Object {
        throw new Error("Illegal Operation, read only");
        return null;
    }

    override public function setItemAt(item:Object, index:int):Object{
        throw new Error("Illegal Operation, read only");
        return null;
    }
}

}
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I usually just return a new instance from the source elements when I want to restrict access to an internal collection.

private var _ac:ArrayCollection;

public function get ac():ArrayCollection
{
  return (_ac == null)? null : new ArrayCollection(_ac.toArray().concat());
}

Adding in the .contact() at the end ensures you get a new source instance rather than copying the existing one.

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Note that you will not include all items here if the collection is filtered since you are using toArray(). You need to concat the "source" property to get all items into the new collection. –  Christophe Herreman Sep 11 '13 at 12:21
    
Also I think this implementation would be slower due to instantiating a new ArrayCollection every time you want to access it –  CodeMonkey Sep 11 '13 at 16:51
    
@ChristopheHerreman yeah, that was the idea... to get a current representation of the collection. I can see why that may not always be desirable though, so thank you for bringing it up. (I can only use one @)CodeMonkey If creating a single instance is your bottleneck, you must be the king of optimization. The performance hit is negligible. Just don't do anything stupid like reference it in a loop or something. –  drkstr1 Sep 11 '13 at 20:05
    
@drkstr1 Sometimes it matters, especially on mobile. –  CodeMonkey Sep 16 '13 at 20:11

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