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So I spent like 10-20 minutes refactoring a ~30 line method. The result: 74 lines. That's not good in my opinion. Sure, it MAY be a bit more readable, but you still have to jump to each method to figure out the details. Also, extracting all those methods gave me a hard time figuring out good names for them. And what if in the future when I am refactoring a method and want to use an existing method name with a completely different signature? It get's hard to read - atleast that's what I think.

Here is my code before refactoring:

    public ActionResult Confirm(string id)
    {
        if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(id))
        {
            if (! IsLoggedIn())
            {
                return RedirectToAction("Login");
            }

            if(User.User.Confirmed)
            {
                return RedirectToAction("Index");
            }
            return View("PendingConfirmation");
        }

        int parsedId;
        if (!int.TryParse(id, out parsedId))
        {
            return Http(400, View("BadRequest", model: "EC2007: Could not parse int"));
        }

        return Try(() =>
        {
            UserBusinessLogic.ConfirmUser(parsedId);
            _authentication.SetAuthCookie(parsedId.ToString(CultureInfo.InvariantCulture), true);
            return RedirectToAction("Index");
        }, (code, errorCode) => Http(code, GenericErrorView(null, null, errorCode)));
    }

Now, this is the refactored version:

    /// <summary>
    ///     Confirms the specified id.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="id">The id.</param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    public ActionResult Confirm(string id)
    {
        int parsedId;
        ActionResult actionResult;
        if (! AssertConfirmConditions(id, out parsedId, out actionResult))
        {
            return actionResult;
        }
        return Try(() => InternalConfirmUser(parsedId), (code, errorCode) => Http(code, GenericErrorView(null, null, errorCode)));
    }

    private ActionResult InternalConfirmUser(int parsedId)
    {
        UserBusinessLogic.ConfirmUser(parsedId);
        _authentication.SetAuthCookie(parsedId.ToString(CultureInfo.InvariantCulture), true);
        return RedirectToAction("Index");
    }

    private bool AssertConfirmConditions(string id, out int parsedId, out ActionResult actionResult)
    {
        actionResult = null;
        parsedId = 0;
        return 
            ! ShouldRedirectAwayFromConfirm(id, ref actionResult) 
            && CanParseId(id, ref parsedId, ref actionResult);
    }

    private bool CanParseId(string id, ref int parsedId, ref ActionResult actionResult)
    {
        if (int.TryParse(id, out parsedId))
        {
            return true;
        }
        actionResult = Http(400, View("BadRequest", model: "EC2007: Could not parse int"));
        return false;
    }

    private bool ShouldRedirectAwayFromConfirm(string id, ref ActionResult actionResult)
    {
        if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(id))
        {
            if (ShouldRedirectToLoginView(out actionResult)) return true;
            if (ShouldRedirectToIndex(ref actionResult)) return true;
            actionResult = View("PendingConfirmation");
            return true;
        }
        return false;
    }

    private bool ShouldRedirectToIndex(ref ActionResult actionResult)
    {
        if (User.User.Confirmed)
        {
            actionResult = RedirectToAction("Index");
            return true;
        }
        return false;
    }

    private bool ShouldRedirectToLoginView(out ActionResult actionResult)
    {
        actionResult = null;
        if (! IsLoggedIn())
        {
            actionResult = RedirectToAction("Login");
            return true;
        }
        return false;
    }

Honestly, I prefer the first version. Am I missing something here? When refactoring methods with a few control-flow statements, it gets ugly.

Should I stick with the non-refactored version? Could this be done better?

EDIT: Based on the comments, I want to point out that I used ReSharper's Extract Method, I didn't do this manually.

share|improve this question
    
Seems like more of a codereview.stackexchange.com problem. –  Adam Houldsworth Sep 10 '13 at 14:13
1  
I don't see why you should refactor some linear short method like that. It was a bad idea. If at least you were trying to be DRY (Don't Repeat Yourself), but you haven't told us that you were able to remove some duplicated code from somewhere. –  xanatos Sep 10 '13 at 14:13
    
Agree with Adam. For the time being (as long as you don't use the extracted methods from somewhere else) KISS and YAGNI seem the principles to apply. –  wonko79 Sep 10 '13 at 14:18
1  
I'm with Xanatos on this one. There was no need to refactor anything in the original method based on what you've shown here. CanParseId is the perfect example of going too far with refactoring. You took a straightforward process, and included the dreaded ref variables. –  Logarr Sep 10 '13 at 14:21
    
@Logarr and others - thank you, thats what I wanted to hear. I was attempting to follow the only-one-indent-per-method and 5-lines-per-method coding rule from bennadel.com/resources/uploads/2012/ObjectCalisthenics.pdf - pretty hard with "complex" logic. –  Jeff Sep 11 '13 at 5:41

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I think with your refactoring, you made things worse, way worse.

My first take on it would look something like this:

public ActionResult Confirm(string id)
{
    if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(id))
    {
        return HandleMissingId();
    }

    int parsedId;
    if (!int.TryParse(id, out parsedId))
    {
        return Http(400, View("BadRequest", model: "EC2007: Could not parse int"));
    }

    return Try(() =>
    {
        ConfirmUser(parseId);
        return RedirectToAction("Index");
    }, ShowGenericError);
}

private void ConfirmUser(int userId)
{
    UserBusinessLogic.ConfirmUser(userId);
    _authentication.SetAuthCookie(userId.ToString(CultureInfo.InvariantCulture), true);
}

private ShowGenericError(int code, int errorCode)
{
    return Http(code, GenericErrorView(null, null, errorCode));
}

private ActionResult HandleMissingId()
{
    if (! IsLoggedIn())
    {
        return RedirectToAction("Login");
    }

    if(User.User.Confirmed)
    {
        return RedirectToAction("Index");
    }
    return View("PendingConfirmation");
}

This approach extracts methods that encapsulate a specific concept / functionality that very well might be needed by other methods.

share|improve this answer
    
+1. This is a much better refactoring than the original. –  Carl Manaster Sep 10 '13 at 15:01
    
Thanks, yes this is a lot cleaner. Thing is, HandleMissingId is a good name for that method, but I have many cases where I want to handle a missing ID, but not always return PendingConfirmation view. Should I out a boolean that determines if I should redirect to that view? –  Jeff Sep 11 '13 at 5:46
    
- so the general idea of refactoring is, don't extract methods if you're only gonna need them once? –  Jeff Sep 11 '13 at 6:00
1  
@Jeff: Those two examples are different enough to warrant different methods if those are the only two occurrences. However, if this is a common pattern (maybe together with the parsing of the id) used throughout the codebase, introducing a class that performs these actions would be in order. Stand by for a suggestion. –  Daniel Hilgarth Sep 11 '13 at 8:31
1  
@Jeff: Yeah, this only would make sense if a lot of your controllers have a repeating pattern of (1) checking for a missing ID, (2) parsing it and then (3) doing something with the parsed ID. –  Daniel Hilgarth Sep 11 '13 at 12:30

I am generally of the opinion that methods should be created not so much to break the code into smaller pieces but to make re-usability of functionality easier and more maintainable. I see nothing wrong with a 30 line long method if none of the code contained within it is reused either inside the method or elsewhere in the project. When considering whether to break something into its own method, ask if it's going to be something you're going to reuse at any point - If it's logic that's not likely going to come up again through the program, there's no need to refactor it into its own method(Unless you're running into the case where it's getting long enough to be cumbersome to read or debug)

share|improve this answer
    
I agree - very much in fact - but sometimes I stumble upon 500-line methods (yes, 500, yuck) that don't contain anything reusable. –  Jeff Sep 11 '13 at 5:44

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