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I mean, I malloc a segment of memory, maybe 1k maybe 20bytes.. assume the pointer is pMem How can I know the content pMem refered is all Zero or \0 . I know memcmp but the second parameter should another memory address... thanx

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14 Answers 14

As others have already suggested you probably want memset or calloc.

But if you actually do want to check if a memory area is all zero, you can compare it with itself but shifted by one.

bool allZero = pMem[0] == '\0' && !memcmp(pMem, pMem + 1, length - 1);

where length is the number of bytes you want to be zero.

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3  
+1.. very clever –  Isak Savo Dec 9 '09 at 7:46
16  
Yes, call memcmp in its slower case (two buffers with different alignments), in order to do twice the necessary memory accesses, for a memory-bound task... What a good idea! –  Pascal Cuoq Dec 9 '09 at 7:58
4  
The sarcasm wasn't necessary, Pascal. –  Rob Kennedy Dec 9 '09 at 8:02
3  
That's a really slower than simple for-loop. –  Kirill V. Lyadvinsky Dec 9 '09 at 8:17
3  
You're ignoring the processor's own cache. You can't really guess this sort of thing, you have to measure it. It should be straight-forward, I jsut don't have time now. If no-one else does it, I'll do it when I get home. –  Mark Byers Dec 9 '09 at 9:30

Since Mark's answer has provoked some controversy:

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdio.h>

#ifndef count
    #define count 1000*1000
#endif
#ifndef blocksize
    #define blocksize 1024
#endif

int checkzeros(char *first, char *last) {
    for (; first < last; ++first) {
        if (*first != 0) return 0;
    }
    return 1;
}

int main() {
    int i;
    int zeros = 0;

    #ifdef EMPTY
        /* empty test loop */
        for (i = 0; i < count; ++i) {
            char *p = malloc(blocksize);
            if (*p == 0) ++zeros;
            free(p);
        }
    #endif

    #ifdef LOOP
        /* simple check */
        for (i = 0; i < count; ++i) {
            char *p = malloc(blocksize);
            if (checkzeros(p, p + blocksize)) ++zeros;
            free(p);
        }
    #endif

    #ifdef MEMCMP
        /* memcmp check */
        for (i = 0; i < count; ++i) {
            char *p = malloc(blocksize);
            if (*p == 0 && !memcmp(p, p + 1, blocksize - 1)) ++zeros;
            free(p);
        }
    #endif

    printf("%d\n", zeros);
    return 0;
}

Results (cygwin, Windows XP, Core 2 Duo T7700 at 2.4 GHz):

$ gcc-4 cmploop.c -o cmploop -pedantic -Wall -O2 -DEMPTY && time ./cmploop
1000000

real    0m0.500s
user    0m0.405s
sys     0m0.000s

$ gcc-4 cmploop.c -o cmploop -pedantic -Wall -O2 -DLOOP && time ./cmploop
1000000

real    0m1.203s
user    0m1.233s
sys     0m0.000s

$ gcc-4 cmploop.c -o cmploop -pedantic -Wall -O2 -DMEMCMP && time ./cmploop
1000000

real    0m2.859s
user    0m2.874s
sys     0m0.015s

So, the memcmp is taking approximately (2.8 - 0.4) / (1.2 - 0.4) = 3 times as long, for me. It'd be interesting to see other people's results - all my malloced memory is zeroed, so I'm getting the worst-case time for each comparison, always.

With smaller blocks (and more of them) the comparison time is less significant, but memcmp is still slower:

$ gcc-4 cmploop.c -o cmploop -pedantic -Wall -O2 -DEMPTY -Dblocksize=20 -Dcount=10000000 && time ./cmploop
10000000

real    0m3.969s
user    0m3.780s
sys     0m0.030s

$ gcc-4 cmploop.c -o cmploop -pedantic -Wall -O2 -DLOOP -Dblocksize=20 -Dcount=10000000 && time ./cmploop
10000000

real    0m4.062s
user    0m3.968s
sys     0m0.015s

$ gcc-4 cmploop.c -o cmploop -pedantic -Wall -O2 -DMEMCMP -Dblocksize=20 -Dcount=10000000 && time ./cmploop
10000000

real    0m4.391s
user    0m4.296s
sys     0m0.015s

I am slightly surprised by this. I expected memcmp to at least compete, since I expect it to be inlined and to be optimised for small sizes known at compile time. Even changing it so that it tests an int at the start and then 16 bytes of memcmp, to avoid the unaligned worst case, doesn't speed it up much.

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1  
+1 for trying ;) –  peterchen Dec 9 '09 at 15:08
    
Nice, +1 for measuring! –  Per Knytt Dec 9 '09 at 15:38
1  
+1 for actually measuring! I'll try to make my own benchmarks later when I have time. PS: what CPU/OS are you using? Maybe this could make a difference too. –  Mark Byers Dec 9 '09 at 15:39
    
same goes for memcpy, by the way... :( –  xtofl Dec 9 '09 at 15:42
    
I'm not surprised, as the memcmp may not be optimized for the given platform. I found that one compiler manufacturer didn't use some native processor capabilities, such as the load multiple registers in the ARM processor. If you unroll the loop, you will get better performance, as you divide the overhead over the number of instructions. –  Thomas Matthews Dec 9 '09 at 18:09

If you're testing it, and then only going to use it if it's zero, then be aware you have a race-condition, because the method suggested by @Mark Byers doesn't have an atomic test/set operation. It'll be hard to get the logic correct in this case.

If you want to zero it if it's not already zero, then just set it to zero as that will be faster.

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4  
+1 for "it's faster to just zero the memory out anyway" –  avakar Dec 9 '09 at 9:08

C++ solution:

bool all_zeroes = 
  (find_if( pMem, pMem+len, bind2nd(greater<unsigned char>(), 0)) == (pMem+len));
share|improve this answer
    
+1, it's good to know what the standard library has to offer. –  avakar Dec 9 '09 at 8:59
    
yes, search_n. Have a look at it. –  CashCow Jan 18 '12 at 15:14
    
search_n will work slower. –  Kirill V. Lyadvinsky Jan 19 '12 at 20:34

As you've noted, memcmp compares one block of memory to another. If you had another block of memory that you already knew was all zero, then you could use that reference block to compare with your candidate block to see whether they match.

It sounds like you don't have another block of memory, though. You just have one, and you want to know whether it's all zero. The standard libraries don't provide such a function, but it's easy to write your own:

bool is_all_zero(char const* mem, size_t size)
{
  while (size-- > 0)
    if (*mem++)
      return false;
  return true;
}

If you want to allocate a new block of memory and have it be all zero right away, then use calloc instead of malloc. If you have a block of memory that you want to set to all zero, then use memset or std::fill.

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If it is a huge memory. this comparision takes a lot of time –  StevenWung Dec 9 '09 at 7:49
7  
@Macroideal Unless there is special support from the hardware, checking if a buffer contains all zeros requires reading the buffer. There is no way around it. At least in this answer, the buffer is read only once. –  Pascal Cuoq Dec 9 '09 at 8:03
1  
Pascal Cuoq: Have you measured the performance or are you just guessing? If you've measured it, please post results - I would be very interested to see. It doesn't seem obvious to me that the memcpy solution will have to hit the memory twice - the processor has a cache too, and that is much faster than memory. I'd be very interested to see the results, regardless of whice solution is better. Plus I think it's a standard best-practice to measure performance, not guess. –  Mark Byers Dec 9 '09 at 9:26
1  
Pascal Couq: I've thrown together a quick test and it shows that this method is not significantly faster on my hardware for 10M allocations of 100 bytes, even when the function is changed to a macro and inlined. I'll post more detailed results when I have time (in about 8 hours from now). –  Mark Byers Dec 9 '09 at 9:44
    
(And in both cases, the performance impact was negligible - the main performance hit came from the calls to malloc.) –  Mark Byers Dec 9 '09 at 9:46

You can use calloc if you want all 0s in the memory you allocate

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Sorry, i was misunderstood –  StevenWung Dec 9 '09 at 7:35

For large buffers:

typedef int tNativeInt;  // __int64 on 64 bit platforms with 32 bit ints

// test most of the buffer using CPU Word size
tNativeInt * ptr = reinterpret_cast<tNativeInt *>(buffer);
tNativeInt * end = ptr + bufSize / sizeof(tNativeInt);
for(;ptr < end;++ptr)
  if (*ptr != 0)
    return false;

// check remainder
char * ptrc = reinterpret_cast<char *>(ptr);
char * endc = ptrc + bufSize % sizeof(tNativeInt);
for(; ptrc<endc; ++ptrc)
  if (*ptrc != 0)
    return false;

Remarks:
The core optimizations testing full CPU words - reading one is generally as expensive as a single byte.

The code assumes the buffer is well aligned (i.e. the address is a multiple of the CPU Word size). If not, a block similar to "remainder" needs to be put in front of the block test.

The additional code will of course be slower for small buffers - however, in this case one commonly assumes that these short durations don't matter.

If you prefer you can of course replace the loops with std::find_if.


Performance: 1: 3.9

(VS 2008, /Ox /Ot, 2,47 +/- 0,11 vs. 0,63 +/- 0,19, for 10000 repeats over 256000 bytes, statistics over 15 repeats first removed)

Discussion: From my experience analyzing C/C++ to assembly, I wouldn't expect a compiler to do this optimization - because it is a pessimization for small size, and optimization possibilities of that type are few and far between. The factor of roughly 4 confirms the assumpotion - as does looking at the disassembly.

Also, the total time is negligible for most applications, a cache miss will be far worse and affect both versions the same.

[edit] for the fun of it:

Overlapping memcmp clocks in at 1:1.4, which is vastly better than the single byte check (surprised me a little).

Note that the misaligned read makes that strongly platform dependent.

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1  
I would expect the compiler to do that optimization (not reading one byte at a time, but reading words). Have you seen this buy you any performance with -O2 for instance? –  Per Knytt Dec 9 '09 at 15:49
    
This relies on the fact that buffer is a return from malloc. Which is stated in the question, so fair enough, just be aware that you can't use just any old char* for buffer, because it might not be aligned. Also, it's undefined to reinterpret_cast to tNativeInt* and dereference, but we can probably assume a platform which supports that. –  Steve Jessop Dec 9 '09 at 18:36
    
@Per: See update. ... @Steve: premainder implementation is left as an excercise for the reader ;) –  peterchen Dec 9 '09 at 19:25
    
Interesting, thanks. –  Per Knytt Dec 10 '09 at 8:09
    
stackoverflow.com/questions/1872156/1876630#1876630 I see a roughly 1:4 or 1:8 improvement depending on 32-bit or 64-bit using raw assembly, and only around a 1:4 improvement in C either way. –  ephemient Dec 10 '09 at 15:08

If you need the memory to be zero, just memset() it to zero; it's a waste of time to check whether it's zero first, because it probably isn't and you'll end up doing more work overall, checking and then setting.

However, if you really want to efficiently check a region of memory to see if it's all zero, you can memcmp() it against something else that's known to be all zero. You could allocate and zero one chunk of memory, for example, and then keep a pointer to it for use in comparing against other chunks of memory.

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memcmp against a preallocated region wouldn't be very efficient. It'd require two memory reads per address you want to compare. +1 for the first point though –  jalf Dec 9 '09 at 13:04
    
Why would a memcmp - involving two reads - be efficient? (Fast enough, maybe, but not efficient) –  peterchen Dec 9 '09 at 15:34
1  
It's not terribly efficient, but it's correct and portable. One could also use a loop and check the value of each byte, but a memcmp() implementation may use a more efficient approach, comparing whole machine words rather than individual bytes. –  Wyzard Dec 10 '09 at 3:50

Another C++ solution, slightly simpler than Kirill's. It is somewhat less efficient, though, as it traverses the entire sequence even when that sequence contains a non-zero element.

bool all_zeroes = std::count(pMem, pMem + length, 0) == length;
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1  
not bad, but slightly overkill when the first byte already contains zero. –  xtofl Dec 9 '09 at 15:40
    
xtofl, you mean non-zero. And yes, it will be asymptotically worse than the optimal algorithm in average case (it has the same worst-case complexity though). I actually noted the efficiency issue in my answer. –  avakar Dec 9 '09 at 20:12

More benchmarks:

Roughly based on Steve Jessop's sample. I've tested the following:

  • Naive memcmp (allocate a separate block of zeros, and compare against that)
  • "clever" memcmp ( compare the block against itself, shifted once)
  • std::find_if
  • A simple loop checking each byte

None of these make any assumptions about the array, and simply accept and work on an array of chars.

Finally, I made a fifth version, which casts the array to ints, and compares those. (This one obviously assumes that the size of the array is divisible by sizeof(int), so it is less general. But I added it to demonstrate that working with a reasonable chunk size is a much more useful optimization than messing around with memcpy and byte-wise comparisons.

Oh, and note that I just slapped this test together quickly, and I used one of Windows' timers because I'm lazy. :)

#include <cstdlib>
#include <string>
#include <cstdio>
#include <algorithm>

#include <windows.h>

enum {
    count = 1000*1000,
    blocksize = 1024
};

bool test_simple_loop(char* p){
    for (int i = 0; i < blocksize; ++i) {
    	if (p[i] != 0) { return false; }
    }
    return true;
}

bool test_memcmp_clever(char* p){
    return *p == 0 && memcmp(p, p + 1, blocksize - 1) == 0;
}
bool test_memcmp_naive(char* p, char* ref){
    return memcmp(p, ref, blocksize) == 0;
}

struct cmp {
    template <typename T>
    bool operator()(T& x) {
    	return x != 0;
    }
};
bool test_find_if(char* p){
    return std::find_if(p, p+blocksize, cmp()) == p+blocksize;
}

bool test_find_if_big(int* p){
    return std::find_if(p, p+blocksize, cmp()) == p+blocksize;
}

int main() {

    bool res = true;

    char *p = new char[blocksize];
    char *ref = new char[blocksize];

    std::fill(ref, ref+blocksize, 0);
    std::fill(p, p+blocksize, 0); // ensure the worst-case scenario, that we have to check the entire buffer. This will also load the array into CPU cache so the first run isn't penalized

    DWORD times[5];
    DWORD start;

    start = GetTickCount();
    for (int i = 0; i != count; ++i) {
    	res &= test_memcmp_naive(p, ref);
    }
    times[0] = GetTickCount() - start;
    start = GetTickCount();
    for (int i = 0; i != count; ++i) {
    	res &= test_memcmp_clever(p);
    }
    times[1] = GetTickCount() - start;
    start = GetTickCount();
    for (int i = 0; i != count; ++i) {
    	res &= test_find_if(p);
    }
    times[2] = GetTickCount() - start;
    start = GetTickCount();
    for (int i = 0; i != count; ++i) {
    	res &= test_simple_loop(p);
    }
    times[3] = GetTickCount() - start;
    start = GetTickCount();
    for (int i = 0; i != count; ++i) {
    	res &= test_find_if_big(reinterpret_cast<int*>(p));
    }
    times[4] = GetTickCount() - start;

    delete[] p;
    delete[] ref;

    printf("%d\n", res);
    printf("%d\n%d\n%d\n%d\n%d\n", times[0], times[1], times[2], times[3], times[4]);
}

My results are: (in milliseconds, for a million runs)

Naive memcmp: 546
"Clever" memcmp: 530
`find_if<char>`: 1466
Simple loop: 1358
`find_if<int`>: 343

I think the takeaway point is pretty clear: Anything that does a bytewise comparison is slow. Really slow. Memcmp does more or less ok, but it's far from perfect. It is too general to be optimal.

The most efficient way to solve this problem is to process as much data at a time as possible. char is just silly. int is a good start, but 64- or 128-bit reads would probably perform far better still.

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Would be interesting to know the time of memset to 0 aswell. –  Viktor Sehr Dec 10 '09 at 10:57
    
I'd expect that to be by far the fastest. You save all the comparisons and dependencies on memory accesses. –  jalf Dec 10 '09 at 11:41
    
jalf: +1 for taking the time to do this - it's fascinating to me that something so simple as testing for zero can create so much discussion! But I would like to know why do you claim that memcmp is the slower than a simple loop when your own tests show it to be faster? Am I missing something here? –  Mark Byers Dec 11 '09 at 3:34
    
Sorry if it wasn't clear. I meant that it was slower than a simple loop with a larger word size. std::find_if is basically the same algorithm as a simple loop, so I used that as a representative of "simpler loop with larger word size". –  jalf Dec 11 '09 at 10:59

Poking around with Steve Jessops code for fun I found this variant

int checkzeros(char *f, char *l) {
        char a = 0;
        while (f < l) {
                a |= *f++;
        }
        if (a) {
                return 0;
        }
        return 1;
}

to be about 50% faster (no branches in the core loop). All bugs are mine.

[Edit]: As Steve points out, this version has a good worst case and a terrible best case (since they are the same). Only use it if a completely zeroed buffer is the only case that needs to be fast.

share|improve this answer
    
Good point - this version is good if you expect checkzeros to be true, and bad if the buffer contains random data. In that case, my loop will bail out after one byte with probability 255/256, whereas yours always runs to the end, so I'd hope mine is more than 50% faster. –  Steve Jessop Dec 9 '09 at 18:41

repe.S:

.globl repe_scasb
repe_scasb:
#if defined(__i386__)
        push   %edi
        mov    $0x0,%al
        mov    0xc(%esp),%ecx
        mov    0x8(%esp),%edi
        sub    %edi,%ecx
        repe scasb
        pop    %edi
        sete   %al
        ret
#elif defined(__amd64__)
        mov    $0x0,%al
        mov    %rsi,%rcx
        sub    %rdi,%rcx
        repe scasb
        sete   %al
        ret
#else
#  error "repe_scasb not defined for current architecture"
#endif

.globl repe_scas
repe_scas:
#if defined(__i386__)
        push   %edi
        mov    $0x0,%eax
        mov    0xc(%esp),%edx
        mov    0x8(%esp),%edi
        sub    %edi,%edx
repe_scas4:
        test   $0x3,%di
        jnz    repe_scas2
        cmp    $0x4,%edx
        jl     repe_scas2
        mov    %edx,%ecx
        shr    $0x2,%ecx
        repe scasl
        jne    repe_scas0
        and    $0x3,%edx
repe_scas2:
        test   $0x1,%di
        jnz    repe_scas1
        cmp    $0x2,%edx
        jl     repe_scas1
        scasw
        jnz    repe_scas0
        sub    $0x2,%edx
        jmp    repe_scas4
repe_scas1:
        test   %edx,%edx
        jz     repe_scas0
        scasb
        jnz    repe_scas0
        sub    $0x1,%edx
        jmp    repe_scas4
repe_scas0:
        pop    %edi
        sete   %al
        ret
#elif defined(__amd64__)
        mov    $0x0,%eax
        sub    %rdi,%rsi
repe_scas8:
        test   $0x7,%di
        jnz    repe_scas4
        cmp    $0x8,%rsi
        jl     repe_scas4
        mov    %rsi,%rcx
        shr    $0x3,%rcx
        repe scasq
        jne    repe_scas0
        and    $0x7,%rsi
repe_scas4:
        test   $0x3,%di
        jnz    repe_scas2
        cmp    $0x4,%rsi
        jl     repe_scas2
        scasl
        jnz    repe_scas0
        sub    $0x4,%rsi
        jmp    repe_scas8
repe_scas2:
        test   $0x1,%di
        jnz    repe_scas1
        cmp    $0x2,%rsi
        jl     repe_scas1
        scasw
        jnz    repe_scas0
        sub    $0x2,%rsi
        jmp    repe_scas8
repe_scas1:
        test   %rsi,%rsi
        jz     repe_scas0
        scasb
        jnz    repe_scas0
        sub    $0x1,%rsi
        jmp    repe_scas8
repe_scas0:
        sete   %al
        ret
#else
#  error "repe_scas not defined for current architecture"
#endif

test.c:

#include <inttypes.h>
#include <stdbool.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <time.h>

static int compar_double(const void *a, const void *b) {
    double diff = *(const double *)a - *(const double *)b;
    if (diff < 0) return -1;
    if (diff > 0) return 1;
    return 0;
}

static bool bit_or(const void *first, const void *last) {
    uint8_t a;
    for (a = 0; first < last; first = (const uint8_t *)first + 1)
        a |= *(const uint8_t *)first;
    return !a;
}

static bool use_memcmp(const void *first, const void *last) {
    return first >= last
        || !(((uint8_t *)first)[0]
        || memcmp(first, (const uint8_t *)first + 1,
            (const uint8_t *)last - (const uint8_t *)first - 1));
}

static bool check_bytes(const void *first, const void *last) {
    while (first < last) {
        if (*(const uint8_t *)first) return false;
        first = (const uint8_t *)first + 1;
    }
    return true;
}

static bool check_aligned(const void *first, const void *last) {
    switch ((uintptr_t)first & 7) while (first < last) {
        case 0:
            if (last - first >= 8) {
                if (*(const uint64_t *)first) return false;
                first = (const uint64_t *)first + 1;
                continue;
            }
        case 4:
            if (last - first >= 4) {
                if (*(const uint32_t *)first) return false;
                first = (const uint32_t *)first + 1;
                continue;
            }
        case 2: case 6:
            if (last - first >= 2) {
                if (*(const uint16_t *)first) return false;
                first = (const uint16_t *)first + 1;
                continue;
            }
        case 1: case 3: case 5: case 7:
            if (*(const uint8_t *)first) return false;
            first = (const uint8_t *)first + 1;
    }
    return true;
}

bool repe_scasb(const void *, const void *);
bool repe_scas(const void *, const void *);

static const struct {
    const char name[16];
    bool (*fn)(const void *, const void *);
} functions[] = {
    { "bit_or", bit_or },
    { "use_memcmp", use_memcmp },
    { "check_bytes", check_bytes },
    { "check_aligned", check_aligned },
    { "repe_scasb", repe_scasb },
    { "repe_scas", repe_scas },
};

#define REPS 999
#define BYTECYCLES 0xFFFF
void time_functions(const char *s, const void *first, const void *last, bool expect) {
    unsigned i, cycles = BYTECYCLES / (last - first) + 1;
    char seps[sizeof(functions) / sizeof(*functions)];
    double times[sizeof(functions) / sizeof(*functions)][REPS];

    for (i = 0; i < sizeof(functions) / sizeof(*functions); i++) {
        unsigned j;

        seps[i] = '/';
        for (j = 0; j < REPS; j++) {
            unsigned k;
            struct timespec start, finish;
            clock_gettime(CLOCK_MONOTONIC, &start);
            for (k = 0; k < cycles; k++)
                if (functions[i].fn(first, last) != expect) seps[i] = '!';
            clock_gettime(CLOCK_MONOTONIC, &finish);
            times[i][j] = ((finish.tv_sec - start.tv_sec) +
                    (finish.tv_nsec - start.tv_nsec) / 100000000.) / cycles;
        }
    }

    fputs(s, stdout);
    for (i = 0; i < sizeof(functions) / sizeof(*functions); i++) {
        qsort(times[i], REPS, sizeof(double), compar_double);
        printf("|%8.2e%c%8.2e", times[i][REPS / 4], seps[i], times[i][3 * REPS / 4]);
    }
    putchar('\n');
}

static size_t sizes[] = {0x7, 0x7, 0x7, 0x7, 0x400, 0x1000, 0x100000};
static uint8_t storage[0x100000];

int main() {
    unsigned i, j, k;

    fputs("      ", stdout);
    for (i = 0; i < sizeof(functions) / sizeof(*functions); i++)
        printf(" |%16.16s", functions[i].name);
    fputs("\n-------", stdout);
    for (i = 0; i < sizeof(functions) / sizeof(*functions); i++)
        fputs("+-----------------", stdout);
    putc('\n', stdout);

    for (j = 0, k = 8; j < sizeof(sizes) / sizeof(*sizes); j++) {
        char test[8];
        if (k /= 2) snprintf(test, sizeof(test), "0x%zX+%u", sizes[j], k);
        else snprintf(test, sizeof(test), "0x%zX", sizes[j]);
        printf("%-7.7s|\n", test);

        memset(storage + k, 0, sizes[j]);
        time_functions("  zero ", storage + k, storage + k + sizes[j], true);

        storage[k + sizes[j] - 1] = 1;
        time_functions("  last ", storage + k, storage + k + sizes[j], false);

        storage[k + sizes[j] / 2] = 1;
        time_functions("  half ", storage + k, storage + k + sizes[j], false);

        memset(storage + k, ~0, sizes[j]);
        time_functions("  first", storage + k, storage + k + sizes[j], false);
    }

    return 0;
}

Makefile:

CFLAGS ?= -g -O3 -W -Wall -Wextra
LIBS = -lrt
SRC := test.c repe.S
all: test32 test64
test32: $(SRC)
        $(CC) -m32 $(CFLAGS) $(LDFLAGS) -o $@ $^ $(LIBS)
test64: $(SRC)
        $(CC) -m64 $(CFLAGS) $(LDFLAGS) -o $@ $^ $(LIBS)
time: time32 time64
time32: test32
        ./test32
time64: test64
        ./test64
.PHONY: all time time32 time64

Instead of just the average, this test shows the 1st quartile and 3rd quartile of time taken, but it seems the system was fairly consistent (runs varying within ±2%).

$ make time
cc -m32 -g -O3 -W -Wall -Wextra  -o test32 test.c repe.S -lrt
./test32
       |          bit_or |      use_memcmp |     check_bytes |   check_aligned |      repe_scasb |       repe_scas
-------+-----------------+-----------------+-----------------+-----------------+-----------------+-----------------
0x7+4  |
  zero |1.09e-07/1.09e-07|2.09e-07/2.11e-07|1.66e-07/1.68e-07|1.35e-07/1.74e-07|1.83e-07/1.86e-07|2.00e-07/2.06e-07
  last |1.09e-07/1.09e-07|2.09e-07/2.12e-07|1.00e-07/1.00e-07|1.18e-07/1.18e-07|1.83e-07/1.85e-07|1.83e-07/1.85e-07
  half |1.09e-07/1.09e-07|1.79e-07/1.84e-07|7.42e-08/7.42e-08|6.98e-08/6.98e-08|1.57e-07/1.59e-07|1.39e-07/1.40e-07
  first|1.09e-07/1.09e-07|6.11e-08/6.11e-08|4.81e-08/4.81e-08|6.98e-08/6.99e-08|1.22e-07/1.27e-07|1.39e-07/1.42e-07
0x7+2  |
  zero |1.09e-07/1.09e-07|2.09e-07/2.11e-07|1.66e-07/1.71e-07|1.31e-07/1.57e-07|1.83e-07/1.85e-07|2.00e-07/2.06e-07
  last |1.09e-07/1.09e-07|2.09e-07/2.14e-07|1.00e-07/1.00e-07|1.22e-07/1.24e-07|1.83e-07/1.88e-07|1.83e-07/1.83e-07
  half |1.09e-07/1.09e-07|1.79e-07/1.80e-07|7.42e-08/7.42e-08|8.72e-08/8.72e-08|1.57e-07/1.59e-07|1.61e-07/1.66e-07
  first|1.09e-07/1.09e-07|6.11e-08/6.11e-08|4.81e-08/4.81e-08|6.55e-08/6.55e-08|1.22e-07/1.22e-07|5.82e-08/5.82e-08
0x7+1  |
  zero |1.09e-07/1.09e-07|2.09e-07/2.14e-07|1.66e-07/1.66e-07|1.09e-07/1.42e-07|1.83e-07/1.88e-07|2.05e-07/2.07e-07
  last |1.09e-07/1.09e-07|2.09e-07/2.14e-07|1.00e-07/1.00e-07|1.00e-07/1.00e-07|1.83e-07/1.87e-07|1.92e-07/1.97e-07
  half |1.09e-07/1.09e-07|1.79e-07/1.81e-07|7.42e-08/7.42e-08|7.85e-08/7.86e-08|1.57e-07/1.61e-07|1.92e-07/1.97e-07
  first|1.09e-07/1.09e-07|6.11e-08/6.11e-08|4.81e-08/4.81e-08|5.24e-08/5.24e-08|1.22e-07/1.22e-07|6.55e-08/6.55e-08
0x7    |
  zero |1.09e-07/1.09e-07|2.09e-07/2.14e-07|1.66e-07/1.71e-07|1.52e-07/1.79e-07|1.83e-07/1.88e-07|2.00e-07/2.06e-07
  last |1.09e-07/1.09e-07|2.09e-07/2.14e-07|1.00e-07/1.00e-07|1.44e-07/1.70e-07|1.83e-07/1.88e-07|1.83e-07/1.85e-07
  half |1.09e-07/1.09e-07|1.79e-07/1.79e-07|7.42e-08/7.42e-08|7.85e-08/7.85e-08|1.57e-07/1.57e-07|1.39e-07/1.39e-07
  first|1.09e-07/1.09e-07|6.11e-08/6.11e-08|4.81e-08/4.81e-08|7.85e-08/7.85e-08|1.22e-07/1.22e-07|1.39e-07/1.39e-07
0x400  |
  zero |9.06e-06/9.06e-06|9.97e-06/9.97e-06|1.79e-05/1.81e-05|2.93e-06/2.93e-06|9.06e-06/9.07e-06|2.41e-06/2.41e-06
  last |9.06e-06/9.06e-06|9.97e-06/9.97e-06|1.80e-05/1.80e-05|2.39e-06/2.39e-06|9.06e-06/9.07e-06|2.40e-06/2.40e-06
  half |9.06e-06/9.06e-06|5.08e-06/5.08e-06|9.06e-06/9.06e-06|1.29e-06/1.29e-06|4.62e-06/4.62e-06|1.30e-06/1.30e-06
  first|9.06e-06/9.06e-06|9.25e-08/9.67e-08|8.34e-08/9.67e-08|1.05e-07/1.06e-07|1.58e-07/1.58e-07|1.75e-07/1.75e-07
0x1000 |
  zero |3.59e-05/3.59e-05|3.95e-05/3.95e-05|7.15e-05/7.15e-05|1.14e-05/1.14e-05|3.59e-05/3.59e-05|9.20e-06/9.20e-06
  last |3.59e-05/3.59e-05|3.95e-05/3.95e-05|3.59e-05/3.59e-05|9.18e-06/9.18e-06|3.59e-05/3.59e-05|9.19e-06/9.19e-06
  half |3.59e-05/3.59e-05|1.99e-05/1.99e-05|1.81e-05/1.81e-05|4.74e-06/4.74e-06|1.81e-05/1.81e-05|4.74e-06/4.75e-06
  first|3.59e-05/3.59e-05|2.04e-07/2.04e-07|2.04e-07/2.04e-07|2.13e-07/2.13e-07|2.65e-07/2.66e-07|2.82e-07/2.82e-07
0x10000|
  zero |9.52e-03/1.07e-02|1.14e-02/1.17e-02|1.94e-02/2.04e-02|3.43e-03/3.52e-03|9.59e-03/1.07e-02|3.10e-03/3.17e-03
  last |9.57e-03/1.07e-02|1.14e-02/1.17e-02|9.73e-03/1.08e-02|3.04e-03/3.13e-03|9.57e-03/1.05e-02|3.11e-03/3.22e-03
  half |9.54e-03/1.06e-02|5.06e-03/5.13e-03|4.69e-03/4.76e-03|1.17e-03/1.17e-03|4.60e-03/4.65e-03|1.18e-03/1.18e-03
  first|9.55e-03/1.07e-02|2.28e-06/2.29e-06|2.26e-06/2.27e-06|2.28e-06/2.29e-06|2.34e-06/2.35e-06|2.36e-06/2.36e-06
cc -m64 -g -O3 -W -Wall -Wextra  -o test64 test.c repe.S -lrt
./test64
       |          bit_or |      use_memcmp |     check_bytes |   check_aligned |      repe_scasb |       repe_scas
-------+-----------------+-----------------+-----------------+-----------------+-----------------+-----------------
0x7+4  |
  zero |9.14e-08/9.14e-08|1.65e-07/1.65e-07|1.17e-07/1.17e-07|1.26e-07/1.26e-07|1.52e-07/1.52e-07|2.57e-07/2.67e-07
  last |9.14e-08/9.14e-08|1.65e-07/1.65e-07|1.04e-07/1.17e-07|1.09e-07/1.09e-07|1.52e-07/1.52e-07|1.70e-07/1.70e-07
  half |9.14e-08/9.14e-08|1.35e-07/1.35e-07|7.83e-08/7.83e-08|5.66e-08/5.66e-08|1.26e-07/1.26e-07|7.83e-08/7.83e-08
  first|9.14e-08/9.14e-08|4.79e-08/4.79e-08|5.23e-08/5.23e-08|5.66e-08/5.66e-08|1.00e-07/1.00e-07|7.83e-08/7.83e-08
0x7+2  |
  zero |9.14e-08/9.14e-08|1.65e-07/1.65e-07|1.17e-07/1.17e-07|1.26e-07/1.26e-07|1.52e-07/1.52e-07|2.30e-07/2.57e-07
  last |9.14e-08/9.14e-08|1.65e-07/1.65e-07|1.04e-07/1.04e-07|1.09e-07/1.09e-07|1.52e-07/1.52e-07|2.22e-07/2.22e-07
  half |9.14e-08/9.14e-08|1.35e-07/1.35e-07|7.83e-08/7.83e-08|7.83e-08/7.83e-08|1.26e-07/1.26e-07|1.09e-07/1.09e-07
  first|9.14e-08/9.14e-08|4.79e-08/4.79e-08|5.23e-08/5.23e-08|5.66e-08/5.66e-08|1.00e-07/1.00e-07|7.40e-08/7.40e-08
0x7+1  |
  zero |9.14e-08/9.14e-08|1.65e-07/1.65e-07|1.17e-07/1.17e-07|1.17e-07/1.17e-07|1.52e-07/1.52e-07|2.30e-07/2.32e-07
  last |9.14e-08/9.14e-08|1.65e-07/1.65e-07|1.04e-07/1.04e-07|1.04e-07/1.13e-07|1.52e-07/1.52e-07|1.52e-07/1.52e-07
  half |9.14e-08/9.14e-08|1.35e-07/1.35e-07|7.83e-08/7.83e-08|7.40e-08/7.40e-08|1.26e-07/1.26e-07|1.52e-07/1.52e-07
  first|9.14e-08/9.14e-08|3.92e-08/3.92e-08|4.36e-08/4.36e-08|4.79e-08/4.79e-08|1.00e-07/1.00e-07|7.83e-08/7.83e-08
0x7    |
  zero |9.14e-08/9.14e-08|1.65e-07/1.65e-07|1.17e-07/1.17e-07|1.52e-07/1.52e-07|1.52e-07/1.52e-07|2.39e-07/2.65e-07
  last |9.14e-08/9.14e-08|1.65e-07/1.65e-07|1.04e-07/1.04e-07|1.26e-07/1.26e-07|1.52e-07/1.52e-07|1.70e-07/1.70e-07
  half |9.14e-08/9.14e-08|1.35e-07/1.35e-07|7.83e-08/7.83e-08|6.53e-08/6.53e-08|1.26e-07/1.26e-07|8.70e-08/8.70e-08
  first|9.14e-08/9.14e-08|4.79e-08/4.79e-08|5.23e-08/5.23e-08|6.53e-08/6.53e-08|1.00e-07/1.00e-07|8.70e-08/8.70e-08
0x400  |
  zero |9.04e-06/9.04e-06|9.90e-06/9.90e-06|9.03e-06/9.05e-06|2.36e-06/2.36e-06|9.01e-06/9.01e-06|1.25e-06/1.25e-06
  last |9.04e-06/9.04e-06|9.90e-06/9.90e-06|9.03e-06/9.03e-06|2.35e-06/2.35e-06|9.01e-06/9.01e-06|1.23e-06/1.23e-06
  half |9.04e-06/9.04e-06|5.02e-06/5.02e-06|4.59e-06/4.59e-06|1.25e-06/1.25e-06|4.57e-06/4.57e-06|6.84e-07/6.84e-07
  first|9.04e-06/9.04e-06|6.19e-08/7.47e-08|7.91e-08/7.92e-08|7.03e-08/7.05e-08|1.14e-07/1.15e-07|1.27e-07/1.28e-07
0x1000 |
  zero |3.61e-05/3.61e-05|3.93e-05/3.93e-05|3.58e-05/3.58e-05|9.08e-06/9.08e-06|3.58e-05/3.58e-05|4.64e-06/4.64e-06
  last |3.61e-05/3.61e-05|3.93e-05/3.93e-05|3.58e-05/3.58e-05|9.07e-06/9.07e-06|3.58e-05/3.58e-05|4.61e-06/4.61e-06
  half |3.61e-05/3.61e-05|1.97e-05/1.97e-05|1.80e-05/1.80e-05|4.63e-06/4.63e-06|1.80e-05/1.80e-05|2.40e-06/2.40e-06
  first|3.61e-05/3.61e-05|1.04e-07/1.17e-07|1.21e-07/1.21e-07|1.26e-07/1.26e-07|1.58e-07/1.58e-07|1.71e-07/1.71e-07
0x10000|
  zero |1.08e-02/1.09e-02|1.03e-02/1.04e-02|9.38e-03/9.50e-03|2.41e-03/2.49e-03|9.33e-03/9.50e-03|1.67e-03/1.73e-03
  last |1.08e-02/1.09e-02|1.03e-02/1.04e-02|9.38e-03/9.49e-03|2.44e-03/2.55e-03|9.33e-03/9.47e-03|1.62e-03/1.67e-03
  half |1.08e-02/1.10e-02|5.05e-03/5.12e-03|4.61e-03/4.69e-03|1.16e-03/1.16e-03|4.59e-03/4.66e-03|6.63e-04/6.65e-04
  first|1.08e-02/1.09e-02|8.70e-07/8.80e-07|8.70e-07/8.80e-07|8.90e-07/9.00e-07|9.60e-07/9.60e-07|9.70e-07/9.80e-07
$ uname -srvmp
Linux 2.6.32-gentoo #1 SMP Sun Dec 6 16:24:50 EST 2009 x86_64 AMD Phenom(tm) 9600 Quad-Core Processor

As you can see,

  • for short data, simple is better
  • memcmp is actually pretty good at crawling through memory (at least with whatever optimizations GCC 4.4.2 applies)
  • x86's string intrinsics help a little
  • the biggest gain on long data comes from taking larger strides — avoid byte-by-byte access if at all possible.
share|improve this answer

Another C++ solution:

bool all_zero( const char * buf, size_t len )
{
    return (buf == std::search_n( buf, buf+len, len, 0 ) );
}

search_n returns the first occurrence of a sequence of "len" consecutive occurrences of the value (here 0) or it returns "end". In this particular application it obviously either returns the start of the sequence or the end.

The advantage of this is I can also apply it to an array of ints, doubles, etc. which will be able to check word-by-word. (Obviously make all_zero a template to do that).

share|improve this answer
    
You should stop at the first occurrence of any non-zero-element. Your current solution will iterate over all elements in any cases. –  Kirill V. Lyadvinsky Jan 19 '12 at 20:35
    
Why do you think it will iterate over all the elements? It is up to the STL implementer to determine that. I am just showing how there is a straightforward STL call to check it, without having to use some weird functor to fit it into find_if. –  CashCow Jan 22 '12 at 2:10
    
If it will find non-zero element it'll just start counting from next element. Take a look at the paragraph 25.1.9/7 of the C++ Standard. –  Kirill V. Lyadvinsky Jan 23 '12 at 13:20
    
It might do if there are enough elements remaining from that point. But in this case if the first start position fails, there will not be enough elements in the range, so it would be wasteful to look at the next element. –  CashCow Jan 23 '12 at 13:58

The function you want is called memset.

Call it like this:

memset(pMem, '\0', iMemSize);
share|improve this answer
2  
Sorry, my ques how to judge the content of the memory –  StevenWung Dec 9 '09 at 7:34

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