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I try to represent spherical coordinates azimuth and elevation in degrees in a polar plot. I have a set of values to test for 0, 90, 180 and 270 degrees, and it is clearly seen that they are not plotted at the azimuth value they should.

Code:

from matplotlib.pyplot import rc, grid, figure, plot, rcParams, savefig


def generate_satellite_plot(observer_lat, observer_lon):
    rc('grid', color='#316931', linewidth=1, linestyle='-')
    rc('xtick', labelsize=15)
    rc('ytick', labelsize=15)

    # force square figure and square axes looks better for polar, IMO
    width, height = rcParams['figure.figsize']
    size = min(width, height)
    # make a square figure
    fig = figure(figsize=(size, size))

    ax = fig.add_axes([0.1, 0.1, 0.8, 0.8], polar=True, axisbg='#d5de9c')
    ax.set_theta_zero_location('N')
    ax.set_theta_direction(-1)

    sat_positions = [[1, 30, 0], [2, 60, 90], [3, 30, 180], [4, 50, 270]]
    for (PRN, E, Az) in sat_positions:
        ax.annotate(str(PRN),
                    xy=(Az, 90-E),  # theta, radius
                    bbox=dict(boxstyle="round", fc = 'green', alpha = 0.5),
                    horizontalalignment='center',
                    verticalalignment='bottom')


    ax.set_yticks(range(0, 90, 10))                   # Define the yticks
    yLabel = ['90', '', '', '60', '', '', '30', '', '', '']
    ax.set_yticklabels(yLabel)
    grid(True)

    savefig('foo.png')

And this is the result, clearly imprecise: enter image description here

I have changed the axis so they start at 0 degrees and then go clockwise, and the radius represents the elevation (from 90º at the circle center, until 0º at the border).

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3  
This is not a case of degrees versus radians? I don't know mpl polar plots by heart, but since '1' is at the right angle, and the angles between consecutives satellite positions are the same (just not 90 degrees), it looks like it. Unless, of course, you're not talking about the angles being imprecise. –  Evert Sep 10 '13 at 14:41
    
@Evert, you are correct. theta is in radians instead of degrees. Converting to radians with degree * (pi / 180.) will lead to the correct results. –  Rutger Kassies Sep 10 '13 at 14:44
    
You might also want to use ax.set_yticks(range(0, 100, 10)) to make the alt=0 (at r=90) tick show. –  askewchan Sep 10 '13 at 14:49
1  
@Evert That's right. I can accept that as an answer if you insert as one –  Roman Rdgz Sep 10 '13 at 14:59

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Late, but:

Code:

from matplotlib.pyplot import rc, grid, figure, plot, rcParams, savefig
from math import radians

def generate_satellite_plot(observer_lat, observer_lon):
    rc('grid', color='#316931', linewidth=1, linestyle='-')
    rc('xtick', labelsize=15)
    rc('ytick', labelsize=15)

    # force square figure and square axes looks better for polar, IMO
    width, height = rcParams['figure.figsize']
    size = min(width, height)
    # make a square figure
    fig = figure(figsize=(size, size))

    ax = fig.add_axes([0.1, 0.1, 0.8, 0.8], polar=True, axisbg='#d5de9c')
    ax.set_theta_zero_location('N')
    ax.set_theta_direction(-1)

    sat_positions = [[1, 30, 0], [2, 60, 90], [3, 30, 180], [4, 50, 270]]
    for (PRN, E, Az) in sat_positions:
        ax.annotate(str(PRN),
                    xy=(radians(Az), 90-E),  # theta, radius
                    bbox=dict(boxstyle="round", fc = 'green', alpha = 0.5),
                    horizontalalignment='center',
                    verticalalignment='center')


    ax.set_yticks(range(0, 90+10, 10))                   # Define the yticks
    yLabel = ['90', '', '', '60', '', '', '30', '', '', '']
    ax.set_yticklabels(yLabel)
    grid(True)

    savefig('foo.png')

Result: http://i.stack.imgur.com/sBVaq.png

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