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Hi guys I have a following code:

from math import sqrt
array = [(1,'a',10), (2,'a',11), (3,'c',200), (60,'a',12), (70,'t',13), (80,'g',300), (100,'a',305), (220,'c',307), (230,'t',306), (250,'g',302)]


def stat(lst):
    """Calculate mean and std deviation from the input list."""
    n = float(len(lst))
    mean = sum([pair[0] for pair in lst])/n
##    mean2 = sum([pair[2] for pair in lst])/n
    stdev = sqrt((sum(x[0]*x[0] for x in lst) / n) - (mean * mean))
##    stdev2 = sqrt((sum(x[2]*x[2] for x in lst) / n) - (mean2 * mean2)) 

    return mean, stdev

def parse(lst, n):
    cluster = []
    for i in lst:
        if len(cluster) <= 1:    # the first two values are going directly in
            cluster.append(i)
            continue
###### add also the distance between lengths
        mean,stdev = stat(cluster)
        if (abs(mean - i[0]) > n * stdev):   # check the "distance"
            yield cluster
            cluster[:] = []    # reset cluster to the empty list

        cluster.append(i)
    yield cluster           # yield the last cluster

for cluster in parse(array, 7):
    print(cluster)

What it does it clusters my list of tuples (array) by looking at the variable i[0]. What I want to also implement is further cluster it also by variable i[2] in each of my tuple.

Current output is:

[(1, 'a', 10), (2, 'a', 11), (3, 'c', 200)]
[(60, 'a', 12), (70, 't', 13), (80, 'g', 300), (100, 'a', 305)]
[(220, 'c', 307), (230, 't', 306), (250, 'g', 302)]

and I would like sth like:

[(1, 'a', 10), (2, 'a', 11)]
[(3, 'c', 200)]
[(60, 'a', 12), (70, 't', 13)]
[(80, 'g', 300), (100, 'a', 305)]
[(220, 'c', 307), (230, 't', 306), (250, 'g', 302)]

So the values of i[0] are close by and i[2] also. Any ideas how to crack it?

share|improve this question

You can second time use your parse method for results from first running. In this case you will receive not exactly the same you want but very similar:

def stat(lst, index):
    """Calculate mean and std deviation from the input list."""
    n = float(len(lst))
    mean = sum([pair[index] for pair in lst])/n
    stdev = sqrt((sum(x[index]*x[index] for x in lst) / n) - (mean * mean))
    return mean, stdev

def parse(lst, n, index):
    cluster = []
    for i in lst:
        if len(cluster) <= 1:    # the first two values are going directly in
            cluster.append(i)
            continue
        mean, stdev = stat(cluster, index)
        if (abs(mean - i[index]) > n * stdev):   # check the "distance"
            yield cluster
            cluster[:] = []    # reset cluster to the empty list

        cluster.append(i)
    yield cluster           # yield the last cluster

for cluster in parse(array, 7, 0):
    for nc in parse(cluster, 3, 2):
        print nc

[(1, 'a', 10), (2, 'a', 11)]
[(3, 'c', 200)]
[(60, 'a', 12), (70, 't', 13)]
[(80, 'g', 300), (100, 'a', 305)]
[(220, 'c', 307), (230, 't', 306)]
[(250, 'g', 302)]
share|improve this answer

First of all, your way of computing variance is numerically unstable. E(X^2)-E(X)^2 holds mathematically, but kills numerical precision. Worst case is you get a negative value, and sqrt then fails.

You really should look into numpy which can compute this properly for you.

Conceptually, have you considered treating your data as a 2-dimensional data space? You could then whiten it, and run e.g. k-means or any other vector based clustering algorithm.

Standard deviation and mean are trivial to abstract to multiple attributes (look up "Mahalanobis distance").

share|improve this answer

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