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I have a file like this

:A-73
113: 44
77: 63
75: 56
-
:A-70
63: 58
59: 64
57: 53
51: 57
12: 72
-
:A-66
65: 61
63: 58
59: 64
57: 53
-
:A-119
77: 63
75: 56
65: 61
-

The lines after between [:A-*] and [-] are a set. I want to sort each set according to the second column. Sorting should happen only within the members of the set.

The expected output is:

:A-73
113: 44
75: 56
77: 63
-
:A-70
57: 53
51: 57
63: 58
59: 64
12: 72
-
:A-66
57: 53
63: 58
65: 61
59: 64
-
:A-119
75: 56
65: 61
77: 63

I am not good at awk. I tried with usual shell commands like while loops ; but could not get it. Can you please provide me code with sed or awk that can do the sort.

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closed as off-topic by nhahtdh, dogbane, Adrian Frühwirth, Nirk, Sam I am Sep 10 '13 at 15:40

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions asking for code must demonstrate a minimal understanding of the problem being solved. Include attempted solutions, why they didn't work, and the expected results. See also: Stack Overflow question checklist" – nhahtdh, Adrian Frühwirth, Nirk, Sam I am
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Using GNU awk and its sort-functions, this will be possible. Trying to do it in sed would be ... less than entirely sensible (which isn't quite the same as it can't be done, but it would not be sensible to try). You would use Perl or Python (or Ruby, or Tcl/Tk, ...) too. –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 10 '13 at 15:22
2  
Why do you want to use awk or sed in particular? They are both line-based and not ideal for looking at groups of lines. –  kielni Sep 10 '13 at 15:22
    
possible duplicate of Sort subgroups of lines with command-line tools –  dogbane Sep 10 '13 at 15:28
1  
@kielni actually awk is record based and perfect for looking at groups of lines. –  iiSeymour Sep 10 '13 at 15:34

3 Answers 3

#!/bin/bash

# Sort a single section. This is called in a loop.
sortSection() {
    # Read and echo the `:A' header. If that fails, return an error code.
    read header || return
    echo "$header"

    # Read all the lines up until a `-' or EOF and pipe them to `sort'.
    while read line && [[ $line != '-' ]]; do
        echo "$line"
    done | sort -k 2 -n

    # Echo the final `-' manually since it was consumed by the loop.    
    echo '-'
}

# Run `sortSection' repeatedly until it fails, indicating EOF.
while sortSection; do :; done

Output:

$ ./sortSections < sets
:A-73
113: 44
75: 56
77: 63
-
:A-70
57: 53
51: 57
63: 58
59: 64
12: 72
-
:A-66
57: 53
63: 58
65: 61
59: 64
-
:A-119
75: 56
65: 61
77: 63
-
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Nice usage of : –  Aaron Digulla Sep 10 '13 at 15:30
    
+1 Or use this one-liner (adapted from your other answer): while (while read LINE && [ "$LINE" != "-" ]; do echo "$LINE"; done) | (read HEADER && (echo "$HEADER"; sort -n -k2; echo "-")); do :; done < file –  dogbane Sep 10 '13 at 15:33

If duplicates in each block are not a problem then:

/^:A-/ {                                 # if line start with :A-
    print                                # print the current line
    next                                 # go grab the next line
} 
/^-$/ {                                  # if line is a single -

    n = asort(value)                     # sort the lines in the array

    for (i=1;i<=n;i++) {                 # loop over all the lines
        print key[value[i]],value[i]     # print the lines in sorted order
    }

    print                                # print the current line

    delete key                           # delete the entries in the arrays 
    delete value
    next                                 # go grab the next line
}

{                                        # else line needs sorting
    value[$1] = $2                       # store the second field
    key[$2] = $1                         # store the first field
}

Save it to a file such as sort.awk and run like:

$ awk -f sort.awk file
:A-73
113: 44
75: 56
77: 63
-
:A-70
57: 53
51: 57
63: 58
59: 64
12: 72
-
:A-66
57: 53
63: 58
65: 61
59: 64
-
:A-119
75: 56
65: 61
77: 63
-
share|improve this answer

It's probably possible to do in awk and sed but here is a simple Python solution:

#!/usr/bin/env python2

import fileinput

head = None
lines = []

for line in fileinput.input():
    line = line.rstrip()
    if head is None:
        head = line
        lines = []
    elif line == '-':
        lines.sort(key=lambda x:int(x[1]))
        print head
        for l in lines:
            print ': '.join(l)
        print line
        head = None
    else:
        lines.append(line.split(': '))
share|improve this answer
    
+1 I didn't know about the fileinput helper module. –  iiSeymour Sep 10 '13 at 15:41

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