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I want to pass a class pointer to a function which is a member of another class and it won't work. If the function fill_packet is not a member of any class, the code compiles without problems:

// WORKS FINE:

class Packet{
private:
  char *contents;

public:
  void pack();
};

void fill_packet(Packet *a){
  a->pack();
};

However, if the function fill_packet is inside another class (here Worker), it suddenly does no longer compile as soon as I try to access a method of a.

// WON'T COMPILE:
// error: ‘Packet’ has not been declared

class Worker{
public:
  void fill_packet(Packet *a){
    a->pack();
  };
};

class Packet{
private:
  char *contents;

public:
  void pack();
};

Can someone give me insight? thanks in advance

share|improve this question
1  
what you have posted here is fine. must be something else wrong. –  mark Sep 10 '13 at 15:35
1  
Add more information. Where do you call fill_packet? Are you calling it on a valid worker with a valid pack? What error message do you get when you try to compile? –  Chemistpp Sep 10 '13 at 15:35
    
Sounds like fill_packet may want to be static. Then it should work as well. –  SinisterMJ Sep 10 '13 at 15:37
1  
Don't use pointers to pass-by-reference, use references –  Manu343726 Sep 10 '13 at 15:39
    

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Be sure that the Packet class is defined before the Worker class, here is a full test:

#include <iostream>

class Packet {
private:
    char *contents;

public:
    void pack() {
        this->contents = "Some text";
    }
    char * getContents() {
        return this->contents;
    }
};

class Worker {
public:
    void fill_packet(Packet *a) {
        a->pack();
    }
};


int main() {
    Packet * packet =  new Packet;
    Worker worker;
    worker.fill_packet(packet);

    std::cout << packet->getContents() << std::endl;

    delete packet;
    return 0;
}

if you run this test you will got the output you expect.

share|improve this answer
    
I thought the order of declaration does not matter as long as both are declared in the Same Region. This helped me a lot, thanks! –  potAito Sep 10 '13 at 16:01
    
Oh I get it now. That's one of the purposes of using headers. If I define prototypes of classes and functions in headers and include them at the beginning of a cpp file, in this case main.cpp, the order of declaration does not matter as all names are already known. –  potAito Sep 11 '13 at 8:51

It might be the case where Worker is included somewhere else before the declaration of 'Packet'. To fix this you can tell the compiler that the class Packed exists when you declare 'Worker', and the implementation of 'fill_packet' need to be put somewhere where both classes are declared;

something like this:

class Packet;
class Worker{
public:
  void fill_packet(Packet *a);
};

//in a cpp file:
void Worker::fill_packet(Packet *a){
    a->pack();
};

Hope this helps, Raxvan.

share|improve this answer
    
and maybe #include the header file that defines Packet in this cpp file? –  doctorlove Sep 10 '13 at 15:45
    
yes , in a place where both classes are defined , if in a cpp then the cpp needs to include both declarations. –  Raxvan Sep 10 '13 at 16:02
    
Thanks, this helped me! –  potAito Sep 10 '13 at 16:07

yes, it does compile!

maybe you have defined the class in a header which you did not include?

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This is not an answer, its a comment, I think –  Manu343726 Sep 10 '13 at 15:39
    
This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post. –  Surreal Dreams Sep 10 '13 at 16:00
    
Oh you are absolutely right. I defined a header in earlier attempt and forgot about it. I would accept yours as a second answer if I could... –  potAito Sep 10 '13 at 16:03

If your code goes like this

Packet mPacket;
Worker mWorker;
mWorker.fill_packet(&mPacket);

this should work.

On the other hand

Worker.fill_packet(&mPacket);

will not work, unless you declare

class Worker{
public:
  static void fill_packet(Packet *a){
    a->pack();
  };
};

Edit: note, the compiler error doesn't make sense from the code snippet you posted.

share|improve this answer
    
yeah it didnt make Sense to me either. Grim's and Rawdan's answer solved it for me though. I think this particular error came from a header which I forgot to Update. –  potAito Sep 10 '13 at 16:06

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