Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a table which stores versions of Products (product_versions). These product versions can have a set of statuses (active, draft, archived) and I need get a result set of the aggregate of these statuses for each day (historically) so that a graph can be generated.

While I know that I can use application code (PHP) or database triggers to build and maintain an aggregate table, I am hoping to solve this in a query (partly because I want it to be elegant, and partly because I'm curious about how to do it). If I can achieve this, I can then cache the result or similar.

So far I am able to get the result for a single status like this:

SELECT
    pv.created_at_date,
    (
        SELECT CONCATcount(*)
        FROM `product_versions` p
        JOIN (
            SELECT product_id, MAX(id) AS latest_version
            FROM product_versions
            GROUP BY product_id
        ) grouped_versions ON p.product_id = grouped_versions.product_id AND p.id = grouped_versions.latest_version
        WHERE created_at_date = pv.created_at_date
        AND status = 'draft'
        ORDER BY id ASC
    ) as draft_status_count_subquery,
FROM product_versions pv
WHERE created_at_date >= date_sub(now(), interval 7 day)
GROUP BY pv.created_at_date
ORDER BY pv.created_at_date desc

Result:

+-----------------+-----------------------------+
| created_at_date | draft_status_count_subquery |
+-----------------+-----------------------------+
| 2013-09-09      |                           0 |
| 2013-09-06      |                          26 |
| 2013-09-05      |                          40 |
| 2013-09-04      |                          46 |
+-----------------+-----------------------------+

It's important to note that I need to be able to determine the status of the latest version for each day (using the grouped_versions sub-query) in order to return correct aggregates.

All my other attempts to join in additional statuses have not worked (besides the obvious which is to add additional sub-queries (status_count_subquery 1 .. n) for each status which I'm reluctant to do because the performance is already quite slow with only 1 sub-query).

Thus, I ask the world out there, is there a better way to achieve this result (or similar)?

Test data

Here is some sample data to re-create the scenario:

CREATE TABLE `product_versions` (
  `id` int(11) unsigned NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `product_id` int(10) unsigned DEFAULT NULL,
  `created_at_date` date DEFAULT NULL,
  `title` varchar(100) DEFAULT NULL,
  `status` varchar(32) DEFAULT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB;

INSERT INTO `product_versions` (`id`, `product_id`, `created_at_date`, `title`, `status`)
VALUES
    (1, 1, '2013-09-06', 'Foo Product', 'draft'),
    (2, 1, '2013-09-06', 'Foo Product', 'active'),
    (3, 2, '2013-09-06', 'Bar Product', 'draft'),
    (4, 1, '2013-09-07', 'Foo Product', 'archived'),
    (5, 2, '2013-09-07', 'Bar Product', 'active'),
    (6, 3, '2013-09-07', 'Baz Product', 'draft'),
    (7, 4, '2013-09-07', 'Fiz Product', 'draft');

Hoping for an output like this

+-----------------+-------+--------+----------+
| created_at_date | draft | active | archived |
+-----------------+-------+--------+----------+
| 2013-09-07      |     2 |      1 |        1 |
| 2013-09-06      |     1 |      1 |        0 |
+-----------------+-------+--------+----------+
share|improve this question
1  
Can you provide sample data? On the surface it seems like you'd be better off using a conditional sum to get results for each status in one pass. –  Hart CO Sep 10 '13 at 15:52
    
I've added some sample data. A conditional sum sounds like something that suits the problem although I've never used that technique. –  stephenfrank Sep 11 '13 at 9:30

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Nailed it (yay!) thanks to @Goat CO's suggestion:

SELECT
    p.created_at_date,
    SUM(status = 'draft') as draft,
    SUM(status = 'active') as active,
    SUM(status = 'archived') as archived
FROM `product_versions` p
JOIN (
    SELECT product_id, MAX(id) AS latest_version
    FROM product_versions
    GROUP BY created_at_date, product_id
) grouped_versions ON p.product_id = grouped_versions.product_id AND p.id = grouped_versions.latest_version
GROUP BY created_at_date
ORDER BY created_at_date DESC

Result

+-----------------+-------+--------+----------+
| created_at_date | draft | active | archived |
+-----------------+-------+--------+----------+
| 2013-09-07      |     2 |      1 |        1 |
| 2013-09-06      |     1 |      1 |        0 |
+-----------------+-------+--------+----------+

Let me know if there is any other solutions worth looking at or if this solution has an error in it.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.