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Just removed the following code from a colleague's code:

public ClassName() {
    super();
}

I just want to make sure I did the right thing. Why would someone intentionally write this? This is exactly what the compiler inserts by default isn't it?

Edit:

To clarify: that's the only constructor.

Also, this is not a trick question. The guy who wrote this is more senior than me, so I want to make sure I covered all possibilities before I talk to him about this.

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8  
Is there other constructor? This is too little information to conclude anything. –  nhahtdh Sep 10 '13 at 17:02
3  
This is useful if there is another constructor. –  Peter Lawrey Sep 10 '13 at 17:07
    
to make things more explicit. it might have been a language design mistake to provide an implicit constructor. –  bayou.io Sep 10 '13 at 18:17
    
Doing this is also useful if it is the only constructor AND it is private. This basically means that you disallow people from directly instantiating the class. This is useful if you have an abstract class that you want to instantiate into a non-abstract subclass. –  David Grinberg Sep 10 '13 at 19:11
    
You can, however, just remove super(); from the constructor. (I admit I flagged your accepted answer as "not an answer".) –  deleteme Sep 11 '13 at 1:51

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There is no good technical reason for this. Not everybody bothers to learn the rules about default constructors and many people just like to do things the way they always have. I don't like having useless stuff like this in the code base. However, since it doesn't do any damage, removing it isn't a high priority either, so I'd leave it alone unless wholesale rework is needed.

A key to keeping your sanity in a workplace where you have to share code with others is to accept that your cow-orkers will do things differently from you. Consider limiting changes to others' code to things that matter. And don't be surprised if questioning them about their mindless habits or obsessive-compulsive idiosyncracies is not productive.

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Just because something isn't technically nessissary it can still be useful; such as the { } to avoid a multiline-braceless-if –  Richard Tingle Sep 10 '13 at 19:42
    
@Richard: agreed, there are habits that are actually useful. –  Nathan Hughes Sep 10 '13 at 19:47

If you have a non-default constructor in your code then compiler will not provide a default no parameter constructor. So if someone tries to create an object using new YourClass(). This will cause a compilation error.

Therefore you need to make sure that there are no references in your code for that class default constructor in case if there are other constructors present.

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The other answers are already good, but for posterity/fun, it's worth noting:

  • the super() call is always superfluous
  • if there's no other constructor, the bytecode generated is exactly the same regardless of whether the public, no-arg, super()-only constructor is provided

To demonstrate, here are four classes:

public class Base {}

public class SubA extends Base {
  // nothing
}

public class SubB extends Base {
  public SubB() {
    // nothing in ctor
  }
}

public class SubC extends Base {
  public SubC() {
    super();
  }
}

If you run javap -c on each of the three subclasses, you'll see their generated bytecode is exactly the same (other than their class names, of course):

$ javap -c SubA SubB SubC
Compiled from "SubA.java"
public class SubA extends Base{
public SubA();
  Code:
   0:   aload_0
   1:   invokespecial   #1; //Method Base."<init>":()V
   4:   return

}

Compiled from "SubB.java"
public class SubB extends Base{
public SubB();
  Code:
   0:   aload_0
   1:   invokespecial   #1; //Method Base."<init>":()V
   4:   return

}

Compiled from "SubC.java"
public class SubC extends Base{
public SubC();
  Code:
   0:   aload_0
   1:   invokespecial   #1; //Method Base."<init>":()V
   4:   return

}
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There could be reasons to do this, such as if you have non-default constructors but still need the default constructor to be visible for some reason (APIs like Hibernate require visibility to the default constructor).

Keep in mind that if you have a non-default constructor and don't implement the default constructor, the default constructor will not exist at all, neither internally to the class nor externally.

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You implement constructor like this when there's a parameterized constructor in the same class but you want to invoke default constructor too, because in this scenario default constructor won't be provided.

So for example, you've got class like this:

class A {
    private int a;

    public A(int a) {
        this.a = a;
    }
}

and you want to use it somewhere:

A a = new A(1);

it will be ok, but if you would try to use non-parameterized constructor:

A a = new A();

there would be an error and you will have to add default constructor to the class A

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I explicitly write a no-arguments constructor that is equivalent to the default constructor so I can provide commentary about the no-arguments constructor. I find this useful because I write in a programming by contract style.

For example:

 /**
  * <p>
  * Construct an {@linkplain #isEmpty() empty} service directory.
  * </p>
  */
 public ServiceDirectory() {
    // Do nothing
 }
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