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I am trying to rewrite these three functions in a single one:

def self.net_amount_by_year(year)
  year(year).map(&:net_amount).sum
end

def self.taxable_amount_by_year(year)
  year(year).map(&:taxable_amount).sum
end

def self.gross_amount_by_year(year)
  year(year).map(&:gross_amount).sum
end

Can anybody help?

This is what I've got so far:

def self.amount_by_year(type_of_amount, year)
  year(year).map(&type_of_amount.to_sym).sum
end

The &type_of_amount bit doesn't work of course. And I wonder how to do that.

Thanks for any help.

P.S.: By the way, I don't even know what the & is for. Can anybody explain?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This should work:

def self.amount_by_year(type_of_amount, year)
  year(year).map{|y| y.send(type_of_amount)}.sum
end

In fact, you should just be able to do this:

def self.amount_by_year(type_of_amount, year)
  year(year).sum{|y| y.send(type_of_amount)}
end

References:
Ruby send method
Rails sum method

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Excellent, thank you very much. –  Tintin81 Sep 10 '13 at 17:25
2  
By the way, the & in map is shorthand for referencing an attribute or method on the objects (in lieu of using a block, as I did in my answer above). stackoverflow.com/questions/1217088/… –  Carlos Drew Sep 10 '13 at 17:27
2  
Depending upon usage, for safety you might add a check to make sure type_of_amount matches one of your 3 methods. You wouldn't want someone to call amount_by_year(:delete, 2013) –  Kyle Heironimus Sep 10 '13 at 17:44
1  
Kyle is absolutely correct that you should whitelist your passed attribute/method in some way. Although my answer satisfies your question, I would be careful in designing an application in this fashion. –  Carlos Drew Sep 10 '13 at 17:46

Your code should work as is if you give it a symbol (to_sym is redundant).

def self.amount_by_year(type_of_amount, year)
  year(year).map(&type_of_amount).sum
end

type_of_amount to be passed should be either :net_amount, :taxable_amount, or :gross_amount.

If you want to compact the arguments, you can even do:

def self.amount_by_year(type, year)
  year(year).map(&:"#{type}_amount").sum
end

and pass to type either :net, :taxable, or :gross.

In fact, you can do:

def self.amount_by_year(type, year)
  year(year).sum(&:"#{type}_amount")
end
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This is also very good. Thank you! I still wonder what is best here, .map(..).sum or using a block as Carlos suggested. –  Tintin81 Sep 10 '13 at 17:44
1  
You can combine them to make it even shorter. See my addition. –  sawa Sep 10 '13 at 17:46

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