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After my array in the for loop reaches the last index, I get an exception saying that the index is out of bounds. What I wanted is for it to go back to the first index until z is equal to ctr. How can I do that?

My code:

char res;
int ctr = 10
char[] flames = {'F','L','A','M','E','S'};

for(int z = 0; z < ctr-1; z++){
    res = (flames[z]);
    jLabel1.setText(String.valueOf(res));
}
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use % while accessing flames[] like...flames[z%flames.length()]; –  boxed__l Sep 10 '13 at 17:37
    
use the mod (%) operator on the index expression : res = flames[z % flames.length()]; Or better yet, have an invariant variable n = flames.length() just outside of the for-loop, and then have res = flames[z % n]; –  luis.espinal Sep 10 '13 at 17:50
2  
@luis.espinal : Won't the compiler do that for us? flames.length() in a loop would be optimized by the compiler right/shouldn't it ? –  boxed__l Sep 10 '13 at 18:19
    
@boxed__l - good question. I don't believe it does IIRC. One way to confirm this is to use the javap disassembler on both versions (with and w/o the invariant out of the loop) and compare the output of both. –  luis.espinal Sep 12 '13 at 13:46
    
@luis.espinal : Seems you are right. Did disassembling on a similar code. No optimization. There are projects like ProGuard available to do this optimization and much more. +1 –  boxed__l Sep 13 '13 at 17:24
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5 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You need to use an index that is limited to the size of the array. More precisely, and esoterically speaking, you need to map the for-loop iterations {0..9} to the valid indexes for the flame array {0..flames.length()-1}, which are the same, in this case, to {0..5}.

When the loop iterates from 0 to 5, the mapping is trivial. When the loop iterates a 6th time, then you need to map it back to array index 0, when it iterates to the 7th time, you map it to array index 1, and so on.

== Naïve Way ==

for(int z = 0, j = 0; z < ctr-1; z++, j++)
{
      if ( j >= flames.length() )
      {
         j = 0; // reset back to the beginning
      }
      res = (flames[j]);
      jLabel1.setText(String.valueOf(res));
}

== A More Appropriate Way ==

Then you can refine this by realizing flames.length() is an invariant, which you move out of a for-loop.

final int n = flames.length();
for(int z = 0, j = 0; z < ctr-1; z++, j++)
{
      if ( j >= n )
      {
         j = 0; // reset back to the beginning
      }
      res = (flames[j]);
      jLabel1.setText(String.valueOf(res));
}

== How To Do It ==

Now, if you are paying attention, you can see we are simply doing modular arithmetic on the index. So, if we use the modular (%) operator, we can simplify your code:

final int n = flames.length();
for(int z = 0; z < ctr-1; z++)
{
      res = (flames[z % n]);
      jLabel1.setText(String.valueOf(res));
}

When working with problems like this, think about function mappings, from a Domain (in this case, for loop iterations) to a Range (valid array indices).

More importantly, work it out on paper before you even begin to code. That will take you a long way towards solving these type of elemental problems.

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While luis.espinal answer, performance-wise, is better I think you should also take a look into Iterator's as they will give you greater flexibility reading back-and-forth.

Meaning that you could just as easy write FLAMESFLAMES as FLAMESSEMALF, etc...

int ctr = 10;
List<Character> flames = Arrays.asList('F','L','A','M','E','S');
Iterator it = flames.iterator();

for(int z=0; z<ctr-1; z++) {
    if(!it.hasNext()) // if you are at the end of the list reset iterator
        it = flames.iterator();

    System.out.println(it.next().toString()); // use the element
}

Out of curiosity doing this loop 1M times (avg result from 100 samples) takes:

               using modulo: 51ms
            using iterators: 95ms
using guava cycle iterators: 453ms

Edit: Cycle iterators, as lbalazscs nicely put it, are even more elegant. They come at a price, and Guava implementation is 4 times slower. You could roll your own implementation, tough.

// guava example of cycle iterators
Iterator<Character> iterator = Iterators.cycle(flames);
for (int z = 0; z < ctr - 1; z++) {
    res = iterator.next();
}
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Even more elegant is to use infinite/cyclic iterators, like this: stackoverflow.com/questions/2622591/… –  lbalazscs Sep 11 '13 at 16:35
    
@lbalazscs thanks for comment. Did some testing and updated accordingly. –  Frankie Sep 11 '13 at 17:06
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You should use % to force the index stay within flames.length so that they make valid index

int len = flames.length;
for(int z = 0; z < ctr-1; z++){
      res = (flames[z % len]);
      jLabel1.setText(String.valueOf(res));
}
share|improve this answer
1  
move flames.length() out of the for loop. It is an invariant. –  luis.espinal Sep 10 '13 at 17:51
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You can try the following:-

char res;
int ctr = 10
char[] flames = {'F','L','A','M','E','S'};
int n = flames.length();
for(int z = 0; z < ctr-1; z++){
    res = flames[z %n];
    jLabel1.setText(String.valueOf(res));
}
share|improve this answer
    
move flames.length() out of the for loop. It is an invariant. –  luis.espinal Sep 10 '13 at 17:52
1  
@luis.espinal:- Liked your second idea. Added that in my answer!! thanks –  Rahul Tripathi Sep 10 '13 at 17:55
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Here is how I would do this:

String flames = "FLAMES";
int ctr = 10;

textLoop(flames.toCharArray(), jLabel1, ctr);

The textLoop method:

void textLoop(Iterable<Character> text, JLabel jLabel, int count){
    int idx = 0;
    while(true)
        for(char ch: text){
            jLabel.setText(String.valueOf(ch));
            if(++idx < count) return;
        }
}

EDIT: found a bug in the code (idx needed to be initialized outside the loop). It's fixed now. I've also refactored it into a seperate function.

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