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I'm building this application in Visual Studio 2010 using C#.

Basically there are 2 files, form1.cs (which is the windows form) and program.cs (where all the logic lies).

//form1.cs
public partial class Form1 : Form
{
    //runButton_click function
}

//program.cs
class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
        while(blah-condition)
        {
            //some calculation
            Console.WriteLine("Progress " + percent + "% completed.");
        }
    }
}

There is a Run button and a blank textbox.

When the user hits the Run button, program.cs will perform some task and constantly printing out the progress using Console.WriteLine() onto the console (command prompt).

Question: How can I print to the textbox on form1 instead of printing into command prompt? I will need to print the progress constantly without any user action.

Thanks in advance!

By the way, it doesn't have to be a textbox, it can be a label or something else that can take text. I chose textbox because it makes more sense to me.

share|improve this question
    
While your original question seems to have been answered, beware if you are sending TONS of updates to the textbox for you may flood your message queue causing the form to become quite unresponsive. Form responsiveness also depends on how intense "some calculation" is. You may want to consider a backgroundworker thread that reports progress back to the form. –  Rick Davin Sep 10 '13 at 19:28
    
@RickDavin Note that such an alternative would require have the abilitly to change all of the console writes to something else. If he doesn't have control over that code (i.e. it's library code) that may not be an option, or it may just not be practical. –  Servy Sep 10 '13 at 19:30

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Start by creating a new TextWriter that is capable of writing to a textbox. It only needs to override the Write method that accepts a char, but that would be ungodly inefficient, so it's better to overwrite at least the method with a string.

public class ControlWriter : TextWriter
{
    private Control textbox;
    public ControlWriter(Control textbox)
    {
        this.textbox = textbox;
    }

    public override void Write(char value)
    {
        textbox.Text += value;
    }

    public override void Write(string value)
    {
        textbox.Text += value;
    }

    public override Encoding Encoding
    {
        get { return Encoding.ASCII; }
    }
}

In this case I've had it just accept a Control, which could be a Textbox, a Label, or whatever. If you want to change it to just a Label that would be fine.

Then just set the console output to a new instance of this writer, pointing to some textbox or label:

Console.SetOut(new ControlWriter(textbox1));

If you want the output to be written to the console as well as to the textbox we can use this class to create a writer that will write to several writers:

public class MultiTextWriter : TextWriter
{
    private IEnumerable<TextWriter> writers;
    public MultiTextWriter(IEnumerable<TextWriter> writers)
    {
        this.writers = writers.ToList();
    }
    public MultiTextWriter(params TextWriter[] writers)
    {
        this.writers = writers;
    }

    public override void Write(char value)
    {
        foreach (var writer in writers)
            writer.Write(value);
    }

    public override void Write(string value)
    {
        foreach (var writer in writers)
            writer.Write(value);
    }

    public override void Flush()
    {
        foreach (var writer in writers)
            writer.Flush();
    }

    public override void Close()
    {
        foreach (var writer in writers)
            writer.Close();
    }

    public override Encoding Encoding
    {
        get { return Encoding.ASCII; }
    }
}

Then using this we can do:

Console.SetOut(new MultiTextWriter(new ControlWriter(textbox1), Console.Out));
share|improve this answer
    
Do I put "Console.SetOut(new TextboxWriter(textbox1));" inside the the Main() withing program.cs? program.cs cannot recognize textbox1 which is in form1.cs and does not exist in program.cs –  sora0419 Sep 10 '13 at 19:20
    
@sora0419 No, you'd put that within the form's definition. –  Servy Sep 10 '13 at 19:20
    
when I create ControlWriter, i got an error saying "'ControlWriter' does not implement inherited abstract member 'System.IO.TextWriter.Encoding.get'" what am I missing? –  sora0419 Sep 10 '13 at 19:27
    
@sora0419 Just add an implementation for the encoding. –  Servy Sep 10 '13 at 19:29
    
I tried the first method. The program stopped printing to the console, however, nothing is printed in the textbox either. I put the ControlWriter class inside namespace Form1 but outside public partial class Form1 : Form{}. I put "Console.SetOut(new ControlWriter(textbox1));" inside Form1 class right after InitializeComponent(); Am I misunderstanding something and putting function in the wrong spot? –  sora0419 Sep 10 '13 at 19:39

Don't know if it will work, but you could try to redirect console output. Use Console.SetOut() and create derivative of TextWriter which overrides WriteLine() method and simply assign method parameter to your TextBox.Text Should work.

share|improve this answer

I use sth like this for a listbox:

    public class ListBoxWriter : TextWriter //this class redirects console.writeline to debug listbox
{
    private readonly ListBox _list;
    private StringBuilder _content = new StringBuilder();

    public ListBoxWriter(ListBox list)
    {
        _list = list;
    }

    public override Encoding Encoding
    {
        get { return Encoding.UTF8; }
    }
    public override void Write(char value)
    {
        base.Write(value);
        _content.Append(value);

        if (value != '\n') return;
        if (_list.InvokeRequired)
        {
            try
            {
                _list.Invoke(new MethodInvoker(() => _list.Items.Add(_content.ToString())));
                _list.Invoke(new MethodInvoker(() => _list.SelectedIndex = _list.Items.Count - 1));
                _list.Invoke(new MethodInvoker(() => _list.SelectedIndex = -1));
            }
            catch (ObjectDisposedException ex)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(Resources.Exception_raised + " (" + ex.Message + "): " + ex);
            }
        }
        else
        {
            _list.Items.Add(_content.ToString());
            _list.SelectedIndex = _list.Items.Count - 1;
            _list.SelectedIndex = -1;
        }
        _content = new StringBuilder();
    }
}

and in my main application:

_writer = new ListBoxWriter(DebugWin); // DebugWin is the name og my listbox

Console.SetOut(_writer);

share|improve this answer

put textbox on the form ( multipleline enabled) or text area then you can do in your loop

txtOutput.Text += "Progress " + percent + "% completed." + Environment.NewLine();

share|improve this answer
    
The problem is, the loop is in program.cs, and it cannot recognize the textbox, the textbox only exist in form1.cs –  sora0419 Sep 10 '13 at 19:13
    
Dont use console application then...just use a simple GUI app to do that –  Dan Hunex Sep 10 '13 at 19:51

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