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Given some string originalString = "#SomeWord# More words", I want to be able to get the substring "SomeWord" from the originalString.

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so you just want the string that is bounded by hash marks? – andi Sep 10 '13 at 20:00
    
'qr![#]([^#]*)[#]!' – abiessu Sep 10 '13 at 20:08
up vote 2 down vote accepted

/#([^#]+)#/ works for me.

Some syntax notes:

  • // delimiter characters marking the start and end of the regexp
  • # literal hash mark
  • [] a character class

Explanation of the regexp above:

  • [^#] any character that isn't a hash mark
  • [^#]+ one or more such characters
  • ([^#]+) a capturing group of the above

In this case, the regexp looks for any non-# characters between two #'s. Here's a full example:

my $foo = "#SomeWord# More words";

if ($foo =~ /#([^#]+)#/) {
    print "$1\n";
} else {
    print "no match\n";
}
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thanks worked like a charm – Jamin Becker Sep 10 '13 at 20:27
1  
Note that this regexp will not catch ##, but this may be intended behavior. – abiessu Sep 10 '13 at 22:47
my $substr = (split /#/, $originalString)[1];
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I'm getting a syntax error. I'm on version 5.14.2 though. – David Knipe Sep 10 '13 at 21:37
    
@DavidKnipe can you copy/paste what error did you get? – Сухой27 Sep 11 '13 at 5:50
    
False alarm. On closer inspection it turns out I'd fallen foul of Perl associativity rules. I had print (split /#/, $originalString)[1];. – David Knipe Sep 11 '13 at 7:54

You can also use regular expressions:

$originalString=~ /\#([^#]+)\#/;
# Now $1 holds your required string
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