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i was trying to confront tree javascript Date objects with this sintax

 var from = new Date(1900,0,0);
 var to = new Date();
 var dataTicket = new Date(dataString);

     if (dataTicket > from && dataTicket < to) {
     alert("OK");
     }

but i can't get this working because the dataTicket continue to give me the wrong day!

when i check in the console i have this values in the if statement:

dataString = "Tue Sep 10 2013 22:44:07 GMT 0200 (ora legale Europa occidentale)"

from = "Sun Dec 31 1899 00:00:00 GMT+0100 (ora solare Europa occidentale)"

to= "Tue Sep 10 2013 23:32:44 GMT+0200 (ora legale Europa occidentale)"

and here come the strange thing:

dataTicket = "Wed Sep 11 2013 00:44:07 GMT+0200 (ora legale Europa occidentale)"

i can get it working because dataTicket value is one day after it's assignation, any clue about this?

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Months start from 0, days start from 1 –  Paul S. Sep 10 '13 at 21:40
    
then if i set month 10 i will get september instead of october, right? but here i'm gettin day 11 while setting 10 :\ –  Ryoghurt Sep 10 '13 at 21:45

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Your dateString has a broken zone part. For the RFC2822, the zone should have a + or -, but yours doesn't and then it's interpreted as UTC (+0000); in fact the time is 00:44:27 instead of 22:44:27.

dataString = "Tue Sep 10 2013 22:44:07 GMT+0200 (ora legale Europa occidentale)"

This dataString will work as expected (note the + sign)

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this is really strange, the dataString is created with new Data(), why i lose the + sign? :\ i'm going to check this –  Ryoghurt Sep 11 '13 at 5:32
    
ok, i need to encode the date object when i sent it in a ajax post :) –  Ryoghurt Sep 11 '13 at 7:56

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