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I am trying to find the length of a specific element in a 3D array. I am trying to do this:


if(grid[x][y][0].size<5)


and that I can't seem to figure out the correct way do do this. Thanks!

Edit: Unfortunately .length does not work either "length cannot be resolved or is not a field." ALSO, elements are objects.

Some people asked for clarification, I want to know if there are less than 5 objects in the 3rd element of the array.

Thanks!

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.length gives the length of an array in Java. –  Boris the Spider Sep 10 '13 at 23:38
1  
What is the type of your array? Are elements strings? –  PM 77-1 Sep 10 '13 at 23:40
1  
If the elements are int's, then you're basically asking how to find the length of a specific int. It's 32 bits. That's probably not what you're looking for, so you probably need to rethink what you're trying to ask. –  ajb Sep 10 '13 at 23:48
    
How do you define a "length of int" then? –  PM 77-1 Sep 10 '13 at 23:49
1  
What is the third element of a 3 dimensional array??? –  owlstead Sep 10 '13 at 23:52
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4 Answers

You would need to use instead of size.

grid[x][y].length

However, you have to remember you are only getting the size of the [z] portion of the array.

If you want to get the amount of "cells" in grid you will need to add up all the grid elements.

totalsize = grid.length*grid[x].length*grid[x][y].length;

Even then you must guarantee that the size of the array at x y and z is constant between all the elements.

Remember these are arrays of arrays and they don't have be consistent.

For instance,

public static void main(String[] args) {

    int[][] foo = new int[][] {
        new int[] { 1, 2, 3 },
        new int[] { 1, 2, 3, 4},
    };

    System.out.println(foo.length); //2
    System.out.println(foo[0].length); //3
    System.out.println(foo[1].length); //4
}

Dangers...

int nir[][] = new int[5][];
nir[0] = new int[5];
nir[1] = new int[3];
System.out.println(nir[0].length); // 5
System.out.println(nir[1].length); // 3
System.out.println(nir[2].length); // Null pointer exception

Column lengths differ per row. If you're backing some data by a fixed size 2D array, then provide getters to the fixed values in a wrapper class.

PS. You can't do grid[x][y][0].length because you are accessing a particular element.

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What does it mean "[0] portion of the array"? –  PM 77-1 Sep 10 '13 at 23:45
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The correct expression is

grid[x][y].length
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Can the downvoter explain? –  hexafraction Sep 10 '13 at 23:40
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What you're looking for is this:

if(grid[x][y].length < 5){ .... }
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1  
The only way that that would work is if the element itself is an array. And if it was, it would be 4 dimensional. –  owlstead Sep 10 '13 at 23:46
    
@owlstead Yeah, you're right. Updated answer. –  Josh M Sep 10 '13 at 23:55
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Which kind of three dimensional array? IF it is String[][][] or int[][][] or something like that you should try grid[x][y].length instead size.

Which error it gives?

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How would your code work with int? Please explain. –  PM 77-1 Sep 10 '13 at 23:42
1  
If it is String[][][] then the correct answer is grid[x][y][0].length(), since length is a method of the String class. If it is int[][][] then the correct answer is 32. :) –  ajb Sep 10 '13 at 23:45
    
In the same way that it happens: int[] test = {1,2,3}; System.out.println("Size: " + test.length); The size of int array (unidimensional or bidimensional or x-dimensional) is always array.length, not .size. –  Hugo Sousa Sep 10 '13 at 23:46
    
You assume an array as element type. This is the only thing the element cannot be, as it would mean that the array was 4 dimensional instead of 3 dimensional... –  owlstead Sep 10 '13 at 23:48
    
So you assume that [x][y][0] element is itself an array? –  PM 77-1 Sep 10 '13 at 23:48
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