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This is a serious question, specifically relating to the many frameworks out there for Wordpress and Joomla - Warp, T3, Gantry etc. What I dont understand is how they are different to a starter template and what exactly you are supposed to do with them - simply child theme them or is it a whole other codex to learn? I mean, all of the native codex is there with Joomla and WP anyway to construct a theme simple enough so what good does a whole proprietary app do between your design and the CMS? Are they faster to develop with?

What confuses me is that people seem to love them and claim that they make life easier but I dont get how adding another technology to learn can make things easier. Like I say, it is a serious question, not one for effect to make a point.

Can anybody define the difference between a framework and a starter template? I ask in part because I am one of those anxious developers who always feels like I am somehow missing a trick or doing things the "wrong" way - what am I missing?

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Warp seems to be a rich tool set to develop cross-platform themes. i.e. themes that you style once adn then work in WP and in Joomla, etc. (I suppose). What the point of Gantry is I have trouble following, too, but maybe the answer is in the video. T3 seems easier to grasp: it comes with template-related features that make life easier - for example, a responsive CSS bases, and compiled CSS. Those things go beyond what a mere template - they are more a basis (or, a framework) for your template. They take away repetitive jobs in theme development. Hence the name "Template framework" –  Pekka 웃 Sep 10 '13 at 23:53

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This is definitely mostly an issue of definition, and I can guarantee that some cases will not follow what I outline below. Obviously, anyone is free to call the template/framework by whatever they want.

Generally though, a template is comprised of basic HTML and CSS that works with the platform (Wordpress, Joomla, etc) that is used to build the output to the page. In Wordpress, this contains the loop and other constructs to get all the content for the page. In Joomla, it outlines all the module positions available and such.

Typically when you purchase a higher end theme, you will have significant choices on the backend to customize the theme without having to actually code. These parameters let you typically change colors and such.

Some of the theme developers and others have taken this parameter settings system to the next level and made it into a framework. In all the cases that I've seen, "framework" is really the basis for the template parameter system. In this way, you can have consistency between different themes and expect the same settings and features between different themes. This is why they use a different word, because it really isn't a "theme" any more. It really is like a "theme engine" in that it is a backend system for changing things in the theme.

Yes, many platforms offer some basic options for editing the theme out of the box, so in most cases, the framework is really an improvement on the base platform's theme engine.

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Thank you, I feel you've nailed it. –  user2317093 Sep 11 '13 at 10:34

It's been my experience that a theme will be a visual style along with a set of theme options available in the admin (in addition to Customize if it's supported).

Theme Frameworks on the other hand, like Thesis, are installed just like a theme but have a very vanilla visual style that you build your theme on top of. Usually the framework provides many added features that aren't available in WP core.

tl;dr - Themes frameworks aren't installed and used right away, they are installed and built upon to deliver a site.

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