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I am interested in creating a generic function and decorating all other functions with it. The new function will contain arguments from both functions. Example

def decorator(func):
    Some chunk of code

@decorator
def func(a,b):
    print a**2,b**2
    return a**2,b**2

#Equivalent func of what I want out of the decorator
def equiv_func(a,b,var):
    print var # I want to modify all decorated functions to accept a new
              # argument and print it using "print var"
    print a**2, b**2
    return a**2, b**2

This is what I kind of came up with but...

def decor(func):
    def modify(var,**kwargs):
       print var
       x,y=func(**kwargs)
       return x,y
    return modify

@decor
def func(a,b):
    print a**2,b**2
    return a**2,b**2

>>> func(var="hi",a=4,b=5)
hi
16 25

I used **kwargs as a way to account for arguments of func, but this forces me to use func(var="hi",a=4,b=5) instead of func(a=4,b=5,var="hi") due to the positioning of **kwargs.

Also, this work around prevents me from using **kwargs when defining my decorator when I need it since it is already used to input arguments into func. Example

def test(**kwargs):
    if 'test_ans' in kwargs:
        if kwargs['test_ans']=='y':
            return True
    else:
        return False

def decor(func):
    def modify(var,**kwargs):
       if test(**kwargs): # I need to use **kwargs here, but I also need it to define my  
                          # arguments in func.
           print var
       x,y=func(**kwargs)
       return x,y
    return modify

...
# The following is what I expect but due to **kwargs being used for two purposes, 
# it doesn't work
>>>func(var='hi',a=4,b=5,test_ans='y')
'hi'
16 25
>>>func(var='hi',a=4,b=5,test_ans='n')
16 25

I hope my question is clear. The examples are just to illustrate of the constraints I face. They are not the actual code (I wouldn't write a test function that uses **kwargs for example) Thanks for any help in advance, coding gurus!

Edit: Or to put simply, is there any other way to modify func(a,b) to func(a,b,c,d,e,...,**kwargs) without using kwargs in the decorator?

share|improve this question
    
You can call as func(a=4, b=5, var="hi"). –  falsetru Sep 11 '13 at 2:16
    
First, wanna agree with falsetru's comment. If you name all your parameters, you can order them in any way you like. Positioning is thrown out the window when you start naming things. The only requirement is that all positional parameters in the function/method definition must have an argument passed to them on every call to the function/method. You can also use **kwargs when defining your decorator...Just because you use **kwargs in an inner function inside the decorator doesn't mean you can't also use **kwargs for the decorator itself. –  Shashank Sep 11 '13 at 2:26
    
Agreed. But the problem is with **kwargs. If I input more optional arguments than what is needed by func (but I need the extra to decide the decorator's behavior), I get a TypeError cuz there are more arguments than func needs. –  Macad_hack Sep 11 '13 at 2:36

2 Answers 2

Try this. You can access the parameters that a function accepts with func.func_code.co_varnames. Once you know that, you can filter everything else out.

EDIT: This is limited in that you would not be able to use this effectively if myfunc accepted **kwargs as a parameter.

def print_decorator(func):
    def wrapped(*args, **kwargs):
        # a tuple of the names of the parameters that func accepts
        func_params = func.func_code.co_varnames
        # grab all of the kwargs that are not accepted by func
        extra = set(kwargs.keys()) - set(func_params)

        for kw in extra:
            print kwargs.pop(kw)

        return func(*args, **kwargs)

    return wrapped

@print_decorator
def myfunc(a, b, c=None):
    print 'myfunc was passed: a={}, b={}, c={}'.format(a, b, c)
    return a, b, c

>>> myfunc(1, b=2, c=3, d=4, e=5)
4
5
myfunc was passed: a=1, b=2, c=3
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, this should resolve the kwarg problem by popping out args from myfunc instead. You are right about the caveat though, but I don't need it for now. Thanks for your help! –  Macad_hack Sep 11 '13 at 3:54

You could allow func to be called with

func(a=4, b=5, var="hi") 

by making var a keyword argument.

def decor(func):
    def modify(*args, **kwargs):
        var = kwargs.pop('var', None)
        print var
        x,y=func(*args, **kwargs)
        return x,y
    return modify

@decor
def func(a,b):
    print a**2,b**2
    return a**2,b**2

func(a=4, b=5, var="hi")
func(a=4, b=5)
share|improve this answer
    
Interesting, lemme try pop! Will let you know if it works –  Macad_hack Sep 11 '13 at 2:36
    
Popping **kwargs requires that I know pop every single optional argument that I may use in decorator before expanding the remaining the **kwargs in func. This makes for a long code if I have alot of optional arguments that I need within the decorator... –  Macad_hack Sep 11 '13 at 2:44
    
In that case, I think your original code is probably best. If you really want to call many keywords in any order, you could use something like var1, var2 = map(kwargs.pop, ('var1', 'var2')), however. –  unutbu Sep 11 '13 at 2:54

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