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I have started producer and consumer concurrently. After 6 hours producer produced around 6 crores messages into queue and stopped producer after 6 hours but consumer is running continuously, even after running 18 hours still 4 crores messages are in queue. Could any one please let me know why consumer performance is very slow?

Thanks in advance!

@Bean
    public SimpleMessageListenerContainer listenerContainer() {
        SimpleMessageListenerContainer container = new SimpleMessageListenerContainer();
        container.setConnectionFactory(connectionFactory());
        container.setQueueNames(this.queueName);
        container.setMessageListener(new MessageListenerAdapter(new TestMessageHandler(), new JsonMessageConverter()));
        return container;
    }
@Bean
    public ConnectionFactory connectionFactory() {
        CachingConnectionFactory connectionFactory = new CachingConnectionFactory(
                "localhost");
        connectionFactory.setUsername("guest");
        connectionFactory.setPassword("guest");
        return connectionFactory;
    }

    @Bean
    public RabbitTemplate rabbitTemplate() {
        RabbitTemplate template = new RabbitTemplate(connectionFactory());
        template.setMessageConverter(new JsonMessageConverter());
        template.setRoutingKey(this.queueName);
        template.setQueue(this.queueName);
        return template;
    }

    public class TestMessageHandler  {
           // receive messages
        public void handleMessage(MessageBeanTest msgBean) {
                   //  Storing bean data into CSV file
             }
    }
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1 Answer 1

According to WikiPedia, crore == 10,000,000 so you mean 60 million.

The container can only process messages as fast as your listener does - you need to analyze what you are doing with each message.

You also need to experiment with the container concurrency settings (concurrentConsumers), prefetch, etc, to obtain the optimum performance, but it still ends up being your listener that takes the majority of the processing time; the container has very litter overhead. Increasing the concurrency won't help if your listener is not well constructed.

If you are using transactions, that will significantly slow down consumption.

Try using a listener that does nothing with the message.

Finally, you should always show configuration when asking questions like this.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Russel for the reply. Consumer took 32 hours for consuming 100 million messages. At consumer am not doing any transactions just consuming produced messages, added the configuration to the post. Thanks –  Pand005 Sep 11 '13 at 17:37
    
How big are your messages? I just published 100,000 short messages in < 30 seconds and they were all consumed within 100 seconds - and that included logging each message on the consumer side! And, it was on a small laptop. Have you benchmarked your TestMessageHandler? How many messages per second can it handle without RabbitMQ in the picture? –  Gary Russell Sep 12 '13 at 0:48
    
Each messages size is 46 bytes. I do agree when I work with 100,000 messages it took less time as you mentioned above. Here, RabbitMQ server is running on one server with RAM size of 30GB in LAN and java clients for producer and consumer on desktop with RAM of 3.4GB. Consumer the logic to insert received messages into CSV file not other operation. I didn't understand, "Have you benchmarked your TestMessageHandler?" could pls tell me? –  Pand005 Sep 12 '13 at 5:14
    
Of course it takes less time; but 1000x100 seconds == about 15 minutes. I mean write a test case that calls TestMessageHandler. handleMessage() 100 million times. How long does that take? –  Gary Russell Sep 12 '13 at 15:16
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