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I have a php for handling the time stuff:

[PHP]echo date('Y-m-d H:i:s', $_POST['time']);

Then I hava a javascript to post the a time value to the php:

[javascript]var $new_time = Math.round((new Date("2009-09-09T23:15:00")).getTime()/1000);
            $.ajax({
              url:"...",
              data:{time:$new_time},
              type: "post",
              async: false,
              dataType: "html",
              success: function(data,textStatus,jqXHR) {
                     alert(data);   
              }
            });

And in the alert, it shows: 2009-09-10 01:15:00. Hm, can anyone tell me why is that?

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JavaScript is client side. It is based off of your computer's system clock. PHP is server-side. It is based off of the server's system time and timezone information. –  BLaZuRE Sep 11 '13 at 3:30
    
how does round'ing a date work? –  Dagon Sep 11 '13 at 3:30
    
@Dagon The OP was probably trying to round the Date.getTime(), but did it incorrectly. –  BLaZuRE Sep 11 '13 at 3:33
    
@Gagon, I am not very sure why is that? but if I don't round it, the function does not even work. I think this has something to do with the conversion between javascript datetime and unix datetime format. –  Newbie Sep 11 '13 at 3:39
    
@BLaZuRe, thanks for the advice. And in fact, I have set the php sever to the right timezone by adding ini_set('date.timezone', <my location>) in my php file. So, why would this still be a problem? –  Newbie Sep 11 '13 at 3:41

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Unlike with most other formats, when given a date string in ISO format, JavaScript assumes it's in UTC.

var date = new Date("2009-09-09T23:15:00");

console.log(date.toUTCString()); // Wed, 09 Sep 2009 23:15:00 GMT

While PHP is outputting the date for the system's local timezone.

If you prefer the date be in UTC/GMT all-around, you can use gmdate():

echo gmdate('Y-m-d H:i:s', $_POST['time']);
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I see, so is there any method or function to make the php thinks that it is a time of local timezone? or is there any method to deduce 2009-09-09T23:15:00 back to its corresponding UTC time format? –  Newbie Sep 11 '13 at 3:48
    
I know I can write a function to deduce the time to the right format. just wondering if there is any easy function from javascript library or jquery to be called to do this. –  Newbie Sep 11 '13 at 3:50
    
@Newbie You can try using gmdate(). Added a link to the docs and update snippet. –  Jonathan Lonowski Sep 11 '13 at 3:56
    
thanks very much –  Newbie Sep 11 '13 at 4:03
    
Instead of gmdate() start using DateTime class. It has great timezone support. –  Glavić Sep 11 '13 at 8:33

Javascript will use the end user's local computer clock where PHP will use the time and timezone settings of the remote server. Try creating a sample page that outputs the current time and timezone offset in PHP and compare that with the computer you are on.

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