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Is it true?

<script src="http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.7.2/jquery.min.js" type="text/javascript"></script>
<script>
 $(document).ready(function(){
  $("#reset").click(function(){alert("hi");});
 }); 
</script>
<ul>
 <li id="reset">Reset</li>
</ul>

The above code works fine. But if I get the list over an ajax call it doesn't work?

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Are you saying that an ajax call returns the li with id reset? And the click event does not fire? –  andrewb Sep 11 '13 at 6:17
    
There is some other problem in your code. It will perfect. –  Amit Sep 11 '13 at 6:20
    
@andrew-buchan yeah i mean what you say –  rosemary Sep 11 '13 at 6:39

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

As the DOM which not be prepared at the onLoad stage you will need to bind using on as in

$(document.body).on('click', '#reset', function() {
   alert("hi");
});
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thanks friend,it saved my life –  rosemary Sep 11 '13 at 6:48
    
See stackoverflow.com/a/18734008/227299 for an explanation –  Juan Mendes Sep 11 '13 at 17:20

No it is not true. You need to use on method for dynamically generated content

$(document.body).on('click', '#reset' ,function(){
alert("hi");
});

with on you can use event delegation by registering events on a parent element that is already present in the DOM. Events from element added dynamically will bubble up to the event you registered with and the handler will only be called if the actual target of the event matches the selector you passed in.

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You need to explain what the difference is. The only people who will understand it are the people who already know it –  Juan Mendes Sep 11 '13 at 6:18
    
Provided the explanation. –  Khawer Zeshan Sep 11 '13 at 6:21
    
Got it. Will edit the answer now –  Khawer Zeshan Sep 11 '13 at 6:29

use .on()

when you create element dynamically you can't handle them directly so you have to makes use of .on()

$(document.body).on('click', '#reset' ,function(){
   alert("hi");
});

A brief explanation can be

When you use a normal event registration model, it will register the handlers directly to the targeted which are present in the dom at the point of the handler registration execution. So elements which are added later dynamically will not get those handlers.

The solution to this is to use event delegation, in this model the handler is registered to a ancestor element which will be present when the page is loaded with the a selector to filter out the source element. This makes use of event propagation - events happening in an element is propagated to all the ancestor elements(there are few exceptions like focus event). So an event happening in an element gets propagated to the ancestor element in one of them the handler is registered then the events source element(event.target) and its ancestors is matched against the selector passed as the second parameter, if it is satisfied then the handler is executed. http://api.jquery.com/on/#direct-and-delegated-events

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This answer is being discussed on meta. (If you're going to copy and paste without attribution, at least fix the typos.) –  Wooble Sep 11 '13 at 10:22
    
@Wooble yeah i copy the explanation from here but i answered before him.What should i do if he posted the answer after me with the explanation he made earlier ? –  Tushar Gupta Sep 11 '13 at 10:32

Event delegation

When you use a normal event registration model, it will register the handlers directly to the targeted which are present in the dom at the point of the handler registration execution. So elements which are added later dynamically will not get those handlers.

The solution to this is to use event delegation, in this model the handler is registered to a ancestor element which will be present when the page is loaded with the a selector to filter out the source element. This makes use of event propagation - events happening in an element is propagated to all the ancestor elements(there are few exceptions like focus event). So an event happening in an element gets propagated to the ancestor element in one of them the handler is registered then the events source element(event.target) and its ancestors is matched against the selector passed as the second parameter, if it is satisfied then the handler is executed. http://api.jquery.com/on/#direct-and-delegated-events

So try

$(document).on('click', '#reset', function() {
    //your code
});
share|improve this answer
    
thanks friend,it saved my life ,thnks 2 everyone –  rosemary Sep 11 '13 at 6:49

You should use the on method:

$(document.body).on('click', '#reset', function() {
   alert("hi");
});

The first selector has to be an element that won't be replaced. This way, when the event bubbles up to this point it is caught. You then specify the actual element that will trigger the event as the 2nd parameter of .on

share|improve this answer
    
thanks friend,it saved my life ,thnks 2 everyone –  rosemary Sep 11 '13 at 6:49

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