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I'm using Entity Framework 5 with Code First Migrations. I have a DataStore class which derives from DbContext:

public class DataStore : DbContext, IDataStore
{
    public int UserID { get; private set; }

    public DataStore(int userId, string connectionString) : base(connectionString)
    {
        UserID = userId;
    }

    public virtual IDbSet<User> Users { get; set; }

    // Rest of code here
}

And a factory class which creates instances of the DataStore class:

public class DataStoreFactory : Disposable, IDataStoreFactory
{
    private DataStore _database;
    private int _userId;
    private string _connectionString;

    public DataStoreFactory(int userId, string connectionString)
    {
        _userId = userId;
        _connectionString = connectionString;
    }

    public IDataStore Get()
    {
        _database = new DataStore(_userId, _connectionString);
        return _database;
    }

    protected override void DisposeCore()
    {
        if (_database != null) _database.Dispose();
    }
}

These classes have their constructor parameters injected at runtime with Unity. So far so good, everything works great!

The problem arises when we get to migrations: because my DataStore context class doesn't have a default constructor, I need to supply an implementation of IDbContextFactory<T> so that Code First Migrations can instantiate it:

public class MigrationDataStoreFactory : IDbContextFactory<DataStore>
{
    public DataStore Create()
    {
        // Need to inject connection string so we can pass it to this constructor
        return new DataStore(0, "CONNECTION_STRING_NEEDED_HERE"); 
    }
}

The issue is that I can't figure out how I can inject the connection string into this class. I can't create a new constructor with a connection string parameter like this:

public class MigrationDataStoreFactory : IDbContextFactory<DataStore>
{
    public string _connectionString { get; set; }

    public MigrationDataStoreFactory(string connectionString)
    {
        _connectionString = connectionString;
    }

    public DataStore Create()
    {
        return new DataStore(0, new DateTimeProvider(() => DateTime.Now), _connectionString);
    }
}

If I do, I get the following exception thrown by Migrations at runtime:

[InvalidOperationException: The context factory type 'MigrationDataStoreFactory' must have a public default constructor.]
    System.Data.Entity.Infrastructure.DbContextInfo.CreateActivator() +326
    System.Data.Entity.Infrastructure.DbContextInfo..ctor(Type contextType, DbProviderInfo modelProviderInfo, AppConfig config,     DbConnectionInfo connectionInfo) +106
    System.Data.Entity.Infrastructure.DbContextInfo..ctor(Type contextType) +52
    System.Data.Entity.Migrations.DbMigrator..ctor(DbMigrationsConfiguration configuration, DbContext usersContext) +202
    System.Data.Entity.Migrations.DbMigrator..ctor(DbMigrationsConfiguration configuration) +66
    System.Data.Entity.MigrateDatabaseToLatestVersion`2.InitializeDatabase(TContext context) +50
    // Truncated stack trace, but you get the idea

Aside from that, this class is not instantiated by Unity anyway; it seems to just be called by convention by Code First Migrations somehow, so even if I could do that it wouldn't really help...

Everything works fine if I hard-code the connection string in that method, but I don't want to do that, for obvious reasons.

Can anyone help please?

share|improve this question
    
Maybe I'm totally misunderstanding your problem, but couldn't you just make a wrapper class (for example IDbConnectionConfig/DbConnectionConfig) that reads the connection string from appconfig and register that with Unity/inject that? –  Joachim Isaksson Sep 11 '13 at 7:01
    
Yes I could, but what would I inject it into? ;) The connection string is already injected using Unity—the problem is that I can't figure out how to inject anything into MigrationDataStoreFactory. –  Mark Bell Sep 11 '13 at 7:07
    
Where is that "The context ... default constructor" exception coming from? Is it Unity that's throwing that exception or EF migrations? Can you update your question with a stacktrace? –  Steven Sep 11 '13 at 7:33
    
Why you just not try to use the IDbConnectionFactory than you do not have to give the connection string everywhere! –  Bassam Alugili Sep 11 '13 at 7:45
    
Hi @Steven, it's migrations which is throwing the error. I've updated the question now which hopefully clarifies things a bit, but as I've said in the edit, I'm not sure it would help even if I could create a new constructor. –  Mark Bell Sep 11 '13 at 7:47

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here's the approach I eventually used, using the custom IDatabaseInitializer<T> code from this answer, which helped me out a great deal.

First we add another constructor to the DataStore class (DbContext) which doesn't require the connection string parameter:

public class DataStore : DbContext, IDataStore
{
    public int UserID { get; private set; }

    // This is the constructor that will be called by the factory class 
    // if it is initialised without a connection string parameter
    public DataStore(int userId)
    {
        UserID = userId;
    }

    public DataStore(int userId, string connectionString) : base(connectionString)
    {
        UserID = userId;
    }

    public virtual IDbSet<User> Users { get; set; }

    // Rest of code here
}

Then we do the same for the factory class:

public class DataStoreFactory : Disposable, IDataStoreFactory
{
    private DataStore _database;
    private int _userId;
    private string _connectionString;

    // This is the constructor that will be called by the 
    // MigrationDataStoreFactory class
    public DataStoreFactory(int userId)
    {
        _userId = userId;
    }

    public DataStoreFactory(int userId, string connectionString)
    {
        _userId = userId;
        _connectionString = connectionString;
    }

    public IDataStore Get()
    {
        // If we have a connection string, construct our context with it,
        // if not, use the new constructor
        if(_connectionString != null)
            _database = new DataStore(_userId, _dateTimeServices, _connectionString);
        else
            _database = new DataStore(_userId, _dateTimeServices);

        return _database;
    }

    protected override void DisposeCore()
    {
        if (_database != null) _database.Dispose();
    }
}

This is the custom initializer code:

public class MigrateDatabaseToLatestVersionWithConnectionString<TContext, TMigrationsConfiguration> : IDatabaseInitializer<TContext>
    where TContext : DbContext
    where TMigrationsConfiguration : DbMigrationsConfiguration<TContext>, new()
{
    private readonly DbMigrationsConfiguration _config;

    public MigrateDatabaseToLatestVersionWithConnectionString()
    {
        _config = new TMigrationsConfiguration();
    }

    public MigrateDatabaseToLatestVersionWithConnectionString(string connectionString)
    {
        // Set the TargetDatabase for migrations to use the supplied connection string
        _config = new TMigrationsConfiguration { 
            TargetDatabase = new DbConnectionInfo(connectionString, 
                                                  "System.Data.SqlClient")
        };
    }

    public void InitializeDatabase(TContext context)
    {
        // Update the migrator with the config containing the right connection string
        DbMigrator dbMigrator = new DbMigrator(_config);
        dbMigrator.Update();
    }
}

Our custom context factory (which is only ever called by Code First Migrations) can now carry on using the DataStore constructor which doesn't require a connection string:

public class MigrationDataStoreFactory : IDbContextFactory<DataStore>
{
    public DataStore Create()
    {
        return new DataStore(0); 
    }
}

As long as we set the database initializer to our custom initializer and pass in the connection string (which in my case is done in Global.asax), migrations will use the correct connection:

Database.SetInitializer<DataStore>(new MigrateDatabaseToLatestVersionWithConnectionString<DataStore, MyMigrationsConfiguration>(INJECTED_CONNECTION_STRING_HERE));

Hope all that makes sense—feel free to ask for clarification in the comments.

share|improve this answer
    
Would it not be simpler to resolve the connectionstring statically from Unity in the MigrationDataStoreFactory.Create() method? You won't need to muck around with your own initializer then. You won't be injecting, but it'll simpler and easier to maintain. I can't currently see that it's possible to inject. –  nicodemus13 Feb 17 at 16:39
    
This is currently working in a live web app, so yes, it is possible! As for maintenance: I haven't touched this code again since I wrote it, so I don't see it as an issue. The main reason I originally wanted to avoid static injection was because it would have introduced a dependency on Unity itself into my code; as it turned out though, this would have been the only instance, so it wouldn't have been too taxing if I had wanted to swap out the DI container at some point. Perhaps a case of over-architecting on my part, I'll give you that. :) –  Mark Bell Feb 17 at 19:12
    
@nicodemus13 How exactly would one go about that? I could not find anything on how to use Unity without Constructor Injection. –  atticae Apr 2 at 13:48

First define your database settings interface for example IDBConnectionSettings. In the app.config add the connection string:

  <connectionStrings>
    <add name=" ConnectionString "
      connectionString="Integrated Security=SSPI; Persist Security Info=False;   InitialCatalog=DB; Data Source=(local);"
      providerName="System.Data.SqlClient" />
  </connectionStrings>

To retrieve the connection string from your Settings file or your app.config you need for example to do that:

 public class DBConnectionSettings()
 {
   get ConnectionString
   {
       var connections = ConfigurationManager.ConnectionStrings;
       // From app.config you will get the connection string
       var connectionString = connections["ConnectionString"].ConnectionString;

     return connectionString;
   }
 }

Now you have to register the Interface somewhere in your code before using it.

unityContainer.Register<IDBConnectionSettings>();

You can use it anywhere with resolve in your case.

public class MigrationDataStoreFactory : IDbContextFactory<DataStore>
{
    public string _connectionString { get; set; }

    public MigrationDataStoreFactory(UnityContainer unityContainer)
    {
        _connectionString = unityContainer.Resolve<IDBConnectionSettings>().ConnectionString;
    }

    public DataStore Create()
    {
        return new DataStore(0, new DateTimeProvider(() => DateTime.Now), _connectionString);
    }
}

Update for default constructor

Make a static method or put this code in the default constructor in this way you do not have to give any params.

  var fileMap = new ExeConfigurationFileMap { ExeConfigFilename = Application.StartupPath + Path.DirectorySeparatorChar + @"app.config" }; // application name must be

  using (var unityContainer = new UnityContainer())
  {
    var configuration = ConfigurationManager.OpenMappedExeConfiguration(fileMap, ConfigurationUserLevel.None);
    var unitySection = (UnityConfigurationSection)configuration.GetSection("unity");

    unityContainer.LoadConfiguration(unitySection, "ConnectionString");
    {
     unityContainer.Resolve<IDBConnectionSettings>();
     .... 
     ....

I hope this will solve your problem! thanks

share|improve this answer
1  
If you do not want to add unityContainer in the constructor you can just use parameterless constructor and there resolve it with the static resolver! This approach replace all connection strings in your classes. –  Bassam Alugili Sep 11 '13 at 9:05
2  
As I said, it's not possible to do what you're doing in your final code example i.e. inject something into the constructor—this throws the exception I mentioned in my question. However, you mention a static resolver: how would that work please? –  Mark Bell Sep 11 '13 at 9:53

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