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Sorry for abstract question, but I'm looking for some samples/advices/articles on type of applications which does some equivalent operations in cycle, and every iteration of cycle should expose its result in certain portion of time (for instance, 10 seconds).

My application does synchronization of data between external WCF service and local database. In every iteration an application retrieves changes of data passing request to WCF service and puts changes to database and vice versa. One of most hard requirement for this application is that iterations should fire every ten seconds.

So here is the issues arises. How can I guarantee that iteration will finish for no more than 10 seconds?

I guess this type of applications called real-time applications (in maner of real-time OS).

DAL components that we use acts randomly on connection timeout behavior. So DB operations may take longer time than 10 seconds.

Here is the estimated code of one iteration:

        Stopwatch s1 = new Stopwatch();
        s1.Start();
        Parallel.ForEach(Global.config.databases, new ParallelOptions { MaxDegreeOfParallelism = -1 }, (l) =>            
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Started for {0}", l.key.name);                
            DB db = new DB(l.connectionString);

            DateTime lastIterationTS = GetPreviousIterationTS(l.id);

            ExternalService serv = new ExternalService(l.id);
            List<ChangedData> ChangedDataDb = db.GetChangedData(DateTime.Now.AddSeconds((lastIterationTS == DateTime.MinValue) ? -300 : -1 * (DateTime.Now - lastIterationTS).Seconds));

            List<Data> ChangedDataService = serv.GetModifiedData();                

                    Action syncDBChanges = new Action(() =>
                        {
                            // Изменения в БД                                   
                            foreach (ChangedData d in ChangedDataDb)
                            {
                                try
                                {
                                    // ...
                                    // analyzing & syncing
                                }
                                catch (Exception e)
                                {
                                    logger.InfoEx("Exception_SyncDatabase", e.ToString());
                                }
                            }
                        }
                    );

                    Action syncService = new Action(() =>
                    {                            
                        foreach (Data d in ChangedDataService)
                        {
                            try
                            {
                                // ...
                                // analyzing & syncing
                            }
                            catch (Exception e)
                            {
                                logger.InfoEx("Exception_SyncService", e.ToString());
                            }
                        }
                    });

                    List<WaitHandle> handles = new List<WaitHandle>();
                    IAsyncResult ar1 = syncDBChanges.BeginInvoke(syncDBChanges.EndInvoke, null);
                    IAsyncResult ar2 = syncService.BeginInvoke(syncService.EndInvoke, null);

                    handles.Add(ar1.AsyncWaitHandle);
                    handles.Add(ar2.AsyncWaitHandle);

                    WaitHandle.WaitAll(handles.ToArray(), (int)((Global.config.syncModifiedInterval - 1) * 1000));
                    SetCurrentIterationTS(l.id);
                }
                catch (Exception e)
                {
                    Console.WriteLine(e.Message);
                    logger.InfoEx("Exception_Iteration", e.ToString());
                    continue;
                }
            }
            logger.InfoEx("end_Iteration", IterationContextParams);
        }
        );
        s1.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine("Main iteration done for {0}...", s1.Elapsed);        
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5  
Since you can't guarantee that this will take less than 10 seconds, you need to decide what should functionally happen when it runs over before you can code it. If the main concern for time overruns is due to communication problems, it probably makes sense to abort the old iteration and start a new one if the timeout is hit. However, this is probably something you should take back to whoever is providing the requirements since they may have some other preference. –  Nicole Calinoiu Sep 16 '13 at 12:33
    
How badly behaved are the DAL components you speak of? Do they end up in an unrecoverable state, with a broken connection? –  flup Sep 20 '13 at 5:50
    
@flup It just starts spawning more and more dead, hung threads –  kseen Sep 20 '13 at 11:08
    
If at all possible, I'd take a look inside the Data Access Layer then, too, figure out what those threads are up to. –  flup Sep 20 '13 at 12:25
    
If you're on SQL Server, the service broker could take you a long way on this. –  GaTechThomas Sep 22 '13 at 15:14

5 Answers 5

You can consider a couple of options...

  1. Kill the iteration if it exceeds more than 10 seconds and hope that the next iteration can complete process. The issue with this approach is that there is a good possibility that the none of the iterations will complete and therefore the synchronization process will never occur. I would recommend the following option...

  2. If the iteration takes more than 10 seconds, wait for it to complete and skip the next iteration(s). This way you ensure the process completes atleast once. The following is a simplified code sample for reference...

    class Updater
    {
        Timer timer = new Timer();
        public object StateLock = new object();
        public string State;
    
        public Updater()
        {
            timer.Elapsed += timer_Elapsed;
            timer.Interval = 10000;
            timer.AutoReset = true;
            timer.Start();
        }
    
        void timer_Elapsed(object sender, ElapsedEventArgs e)
        {
            if (State != "Running")
            {
                Process();
            }
        }
    
        private void Process()
        {
            try
            {
                lock (StateLock)
                {
                    State = "Running";
                }
    
                // Process
    
                lock (StateLock)
                {
                    State = "";
                }
            }
            catch
            {
                throw;
            }
        }
    }
    

...

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Updater updater = new Updater();
        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
For option 1: how can I ensure killing of any child db connection/operation threads of main iteration thread? –  kseen Sep 20 '13 at 4:12
    
If you are spinning off a thread to do the operation, you should be able to kill the thread. –  gpmurthy Sep 20 '13 at 14:25
    
To add to the above comment, it might be good to call a method before "shutting down" that will be close the database connection and any other operations. –  gpmurthy Sep 20 '13 at 15:28
    
In my experience, there is no good way to just kill a thread that is talking to the database. If you know of one, please share. –  GaTechThomas Sep 22 '13 at 15:10

Quartz.net is an excellent scheduler for the .NET platform, which I think could suit your needs.

  • If you want to kill a job, you can implement IInterruptableJob. You should be able to add some cleanup code in the Interupt method to dispose of any db connections.
  • If you want finish a job, but only start another job if the last one is completed (which I think is the better option), you can implement IStatefulJob interface
share|improve this answer

I usually separate the update cycle from the actual timer

The timer does two things:

1) if the update is not running starts it.

2) if the service is already running set a flag for it to continue running.

The update cycle:

1)set running flag

2) do the update

3) set running flag to false

4) if continue running is set go to 1).

share|improve this answer

You might want to read up on the variety of Timer objects available in .Net: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/cc164015.aspx

I personally like System.Threading.Timer because you can easily use lambdas, and it allows a state object to be passed if you create a separate callback.

I would also recommend using the System.Threading.Tasks library, because it allows you to gracefully handle cancellations in the case that the timer elapses before your work is completed. Msdn example: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd537607.aspx

Here's an example of using these components together in a 10 minute timer: Note: to do this with your sql database you'll need to set Asynchronous Processing=true; and MultipleActiveResultSets=True;

CancellationTokenSource cancelSource = new CancellationTokenSource();
System.Threading.Timer timer = new System.Threading.Timer(callback =>
{
    //start sync
    Task syncTask = Task.Factory.StartNew(syncAction =>
        {
            using (SqlConnection conn = 
                new SqlConnection(
                   ConfigurationManager.ConnectionStrings["db"].ConnectionString))
            {
                conn.Open();
                using (SqlCommand syncCommand = new SqlCommand
                {
                    CommandText = "SELECT getdate() \n WAITFOR DELAY '00:11'; ",
                    CommandTimeout = 600,
                    Transaction = conn.BeginTransaction(),
                    Connection = conn
                })
                {
                    try
                    {
                        IAsyncResult t = syncCommand.BeginExecuteNonQuery();
                        SpinWait.SpinUntil(() => 
                            (t.IsCompleted || cancelSource.Token.IsCancellationRequested));
                        if (cancelSource.Token.IsCancellationRequested && !t.IsCompleted)
                            syncCommand.Transaction.Rollback();

                    }
                    catch (TimeoutException timeoutException)
                    {
                        syncCommand.Transaction.Rollback();
                        //log a failed sync attepmt here
                        Console.WriteLine(timeoutException.ToString());
                    }
                    finally
                    {
                        syncCommand.Connection.Close();
                    }
                }
            }
        }, null, cancelSource.Token);
    //set up a timer for processing in the interim, save some time for rollback
    System.Threading.Timer spinTimer = new System.Threading.Timer(c => {
        cancelSource.Cancel();
    }, null, TimeSpan.FromMinutes(9), TimeSpan.FromSeconds(5)); 

    //spin here until the spintimer elapses;
    //this is optional, but would be useful for debugging.
    SpinWait.SpinUntil(()=>(syncTask.IsCompleted || cancelSource.Token.IsCancellationRequested));
    if (syncTask.IsCompleted || cancelSource.Token.IsCancellationRequested)
        spinTimer.Dispose();

}, null, TimeSpan.FromMinutes(1), TimeSpan.FromMinutes(10));
share|improve this answer

Perhaps try this. Please make sure you do not create and use any new threads in DoWork() method.

class DatabaseUpdater
{
    private readonly Timer _timer;
    private List<Thread> _threads;
    private readonly List<DatabaseConfig> _dbConfigs;

    public DatabaseUpdater(int seconds, List<DatabaseConfig> dbConfigs)
    {
        _timer = new Timer(seconds * 1000);
        _timer.Elapsed += TimerElapsed;
        _dbConfigs = dbConfigs;
    }

    public void Start()
    {
        StartThreads();
        _timer.Start();
    }

    public void Stop()
    {
        _timer.Stop();
        StopThreads();
    }

    void TimerElapsed(object sender, ElapsedEventArgs e)
    {
        StopThreads();
        StartThreads();
    }

    private void StartThreads()
    {
        var newThreads = new List<Thread>();
        foreach (var config in _dbConfigs)
        {
            var thread = new Thread(DoWork);
            thread.Start(config);
            newThreads.Add(thread);
        }

        _threads = newThreads;
    }

    private void StopThreads()
    {
        if (_threads == null) return;

        var oldThreads = _threads;
        foreach (var thread in oldThreads)
        {
            thread.Abort();
        }
    }

    static void DoWork(object objConfig)
    {
        var dbConfig = objConfig as DatabaseConfig;
        if (null == dbConfig) return;

        var n = GetRandomNumber();

        try
        {
            ConsoleWriteLine("Sync started for : {0} - {1} sec work.", dbConfig.Id, n);

            // update/sync db
            Thread.Sleep(1000 * n);

            ConsoleWriteLine("Sync finished for : {0} - {1} sec work.", dbConfig.Id, n);
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            // cancel/rollback db transaction
            ConsoleWriteLine("Sync cancelled for : {0} - {1} sec work.",
                dbConfig.Id, n);
        }
    }

    static readonly Random Random = new Random();

    [MethodImpl(MethodImplOptions.Synchronized)]
    static int GetRandomNumber()
    {
        return Random.Next(5, 20);
    }

    [MethodImpl(MethodImplOptions.Synchronized)]
    static void ConsoleWriteLine(string format, params object[] arg)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(format, arg);
    }
}

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    var configs = new List<DatabaseConfig>();
    for (var i = 1; i <= 3; i++)
    {
        configs.Add(new DatabaseConfig() { Id = i });
    }

    var databaseUpdater = new DatabaseUpdater(10, configs);
    databaseUpdater.Start();

    Console.ReadKey();

    databaseUpdater.Stop();
}
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