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I have a string containing many new line and spaces. I need to split it into fixed length sub strings. E.g

a = "This is some\nText\nThis is some text"

And now i would like to split it into say strings of length 17. so now it should result in

["This is some\nText", "\nThis is some tex", "t"]

Comment: My string may contain any character (white space/word etc)

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1  
Your example doesn't ignore the space or new line characters. Are you sure your example is right? –  Cyril Gandon Sep 11 '13 at 8:57
    
@cyril.gandon Or, the title is heavily misleading. –  sawa Sep 11 '13 at 8:59

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted
"This is some\nText\nThis is some text".scan(/.{1,17}/m)
# => ["This is some\nText", "\nThis is some tex", "t"]
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Yet another way:

(0..(a.length / 17)).map{|i| a[i * 17,17] }
#=> ["This is some\nText", "\nThis is some tex", "t"]

Update

And benchmarking:

require 'benchmark'
a = "This is some\nText\nThis is some text" * 1000
n = 100

Benchmark.bm do |x|
  x.report("slice") { n.times do ; (0..(a.length / 17)).map{|i| a[i * 17,17] } ; end}
  x.report("regex") { n.times do ; a.scan(/.{1,17}/m) ; end}
  x.report("eachc") { n.times do ; a.each_char.each_slice(17).map(&:join) ; end }
end

result:

         user     system      total        real
slice  0.090000   0.000000   0.090000 (  0.091065)
regex  0.230000   0.000000   0.230000 (  0.233831)
eachc  1.420000   0.010000   1.430000 (  1.442033)
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1  
People think always Regexs are fast,although this is correct. But in Ruby there is no guarantee. I knew that,which is why you had my upvote,when you posted your answer. :) –  Arup Rakshit Sep 11 '13 at 20:14

A solution with enumerable : split the array in single char with each_char, then use each_slice for doing the partition, and join the results:

"This is some\nText\nThis is some text"
  .each_char # => ["T", "h", "i", "s", " ", "i", "s", " ", "s", "o", "m", "e", "\n", T", "e", "x", "t", "\n", "T", "h", "i", "s", " ", "i", "s", " ", "s", "o", "m", "e", " ", t", "e", "x", "t"]
  .each_slice(17) # => [["T", "h", "i", "s", " ", "i", "s", " ", "s", "o", "m", "e", \n", "T", "e", "x", "t"], ["\n", "T", "h", "i", "s", " ", "i", "s", " ", "s", "o", "m", e",  ", "t", "e", "x"], ["t"]]
  .map(&:join) # => ["This is some\nText", "\nThis is some tex", "t"]
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The last line can be simplified to .collect(&:join). –  sawa Sep 11 '13 at 8:57

Yet another solution: unpack.

You need to construct a string for it like a17a17a17a17a8 (the last chunk needs to be shorter if the string is not exactly x times 17 chars long.

a = "This is some\nText\nThis is some text\nThis is some more text"
a.unpack(('a17' * (a.length / 17)) + (a.size % 17 == 0 ? "" : "a#{a.length - (a.length / 17) * 17}"))
 => ["This is some\nText", "\nThis is some tex", "t\nThis is some mo", "re text"]

This appears to be by far the fastest one of the suggested, of course if the input string is huge, the unpack string will be huge as well. If that is the case, you will want a buffered reader for that thing, read it in chunks of x * 17 and do something like the above for each chunk.

require 'benchmark'
a = "This is some\nText\nThis is some text" * 1000
n = 100

Benchmark.bm do |x|
  x.report("slice ") { n.times do ; (0..(a.length / 17)).map{|i| a[i * 17,17] } ; end}
  x.report("regex ") { n.times do ; a.scan(/.{1,17}/m) ; end}
  x.report("eachc ") { n.times do ; a.each_char.each_slice(17).map(&:join) ; end }
  x.report("unpack") { n.times do ; a.unpack(('a17' * (a.length / 17)) + (a.size % 17 == 0 ? "" : "a#{a.length - (a.length / 17) * 17}")) ; end }
end

Results:

user    system     total      real
slice   0.120000   0.000000   0.120000 (  0.130709)
regex   0.190000   0.000000   0.190000 (  0.186407)
eachc   1.430000   0.000000   1.430000 (  1.427662)
unpack  0.030000   0.000000   0.030000 (  0.032807)
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