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As far as I can see, if an exception occurs in a slot under PyQt, the exception is printed to screen, but not bubbled. This creates a problem in my testing strategy, because if an exception occurs in a slot, I will not see the test fail.

Here is an example:

import sys
from PyQt4 import QtGui, QtCore

class Test(QtGui.QPushButton):
    def __init__(self, parent=None):
        QtGui.QWidget.__init__(self, parent)
        self.setText("hello")
        self.connect(self, QtCore.SIGNAL("clicked()"), self.buttonClicked)

    def buttonClicked(self):
        print "clicked"
        raise Exception("wow")

app=QtGui.QApplication(sys.argv)
t=Test()
t.show()
try:
    app.exec_()
except:
    print "exiting"

Note how the exception never quits the program.

Is there a way to work around this problem?

share|improve this question
    
Can you explain this issue a little more? Slots are just designated listeners that call other code. The code that is called when thoriwing errors can be handled like any other. –  Lego Stormtroopr Sep 12 '13 at 23:46
1  
@Lego: yes, but if the error is propagated up and leaves the slot, that error is silenced. I'll write an example tonight –  Stefano Borini Sep 13 '13 at 13:19
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted
+100

Can create a decorator that wraps PyQt' new signal/slot decorators and provides exception handling for all slots. Can also override QApplication::notify to catch uncaught C++ exceptions.

import sys
import traceback
import types
from functools import wraps
from PyQt4 import QtGui, QtCore

def MyPyQtSlot(*args):
    if len(args) == 0 or isinstance(args[0], types.FunctionType):
        args = []
    @QtCore.pyqtSlot(*args)
    def slotdecorator(func):
        @wraps(func)
        def wrapper(*args, **kwargs):
            try:
                func(*args)
            except:
                print "Uncaught Exception in slot"
                traceback.print_exc()
        return wrapper

    return slotdecorator

class Test(QtGui.QPushButton):
    def __init__(self, parent=None):
        QtGui.QWidget.__init__(self, parent)
        self.setText("hello")
        self.clicked.connect(self.buttonClicked)

    @MyPyQtSlot("bool")
    def buttonClicked(self, checked):
        print "clicked"
        raise Exception("wow")

class MyApp(QtGui.QApplication):
    def notify(self, obj, event):
        isex = False
        try:
            return QtGui.QApplication.notify(self, obj, event)
        except Exception:
            isex = True
            print "Unexpected Error"
            print traceback.format_exception(*sys.exc_info())
            return False
        finally:
            if isex:
                self.quit()

app = MyApp(sys.argv)

t=Test()
t.show()
try:
    app.exec_()
except:
    print "exiting"
share|improve this answer
    
Also, PyQt catches python exceptions and writes to standard error. If you make your application exit on all of these, it might appear that the app is crashing. In the exception handlers, you could in turn trigger a general signal to perform some logging or dialog. –  jlujan Sep 25 '13 at 23:12
1  
Also, to exit the app with a non 0 return value, call QtCore.QCoreApplication.exit(1) from your exception handler. –  jlujan Sep 25 '13 at 23:16
add comment

You could exit the application with a non-zero return code to indicate that an exception has occurred.
You can catch all exception by installing a global exception hook. I added an example below, but you probably will want to adjust it to your needs.

import sys
from PyQt4 import QtGui, QtCore

class Test(QtGui.QPushButton):
    def __init__(self, parent=None):
        QtGui.QWidget.__init__(self, parent)
        self.setText("hello")
        self.connect(self, QtCore.SIGNAL("clicked()"), self.buttonClicked)

    def buttonClicked(self):
        print "clicked"
        raise Exception("wow")

sys._excepthook = sys.excepthook
def exception_hook(exctype, value, traceback):
    sys._excepthook(exctype, value, traceback)
    sys.exit(1)
sys.excepthook = exception_hook

app=QtGui.QApplication(sys.argv)
t=Test()
t.show()
try:
    app.exec_()
except:
    print "exiting"
share|improve this answer
    
forgot to add. I can't override excepthook... because of reasons. –  Stefano Borini Sep 24 '13 at 16:24
    
Hah, well then. –  aukaost Sep 24 '13 at 16:29
    
it's... complicated. :( –  Stefano Borini Sep 24 '13 at 16:56
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